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Old 09-25-2022, 03:01 PM
 
16,164 posts, read 14,677,227 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
Depending on the model, oddly enough, a ski boat may cost more than a college education.
For sure. Most anything by Pavati and a couple of Ski Nautiques leap to mind. A friend has a Nautique G-23 Paragon big block supercharged engine, power ski tower etc. He won't say but I think it was at least $400K.
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Old 09-25-2022, 04:06 PM
 
Location: Beautiful Rhode Island
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
One also needs to consider "What is an educated populace?"

USA certainly does not have an educated electorate, or politicians educated and qualified to hold office. (But advertising works pretty well)

Colleges don't seem be 'educating' for responsible citizenry, careers, financial skills.
Colleges didn't educate for the vast number of entrepreneurs who choose to drop out of college, and get on with being successful.
Colleges don't seem to be improving the academic level of our USA K-12.

so... it's just possible... that 'college' (in the USA) does not equal and educated populace.
And your alternative is not going to college?
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Old 09-25-2022, 04:22 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
98,584 posts, read 97,046,108 times
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Originally Posted by Hollytree View Post
And your alternative is not going to college?
Interestingly, he made a point of having his kids go through college. Half of which they completed before graduating highschool (which is becoming more common these days, even required to complete some college or equivalent, to enter some state flagship schools as a freshman), but still, they got their BA's
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Old 09-25-2022, 07:03 PM
 
Location: Arizona
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It's unfortunate that in 21st Century America an "educated nation" also means a "drowning in debt until you're 50" nation. College is obviously a given for doctors, dentists, engineers, lawyers, etc., but there has to be a better way. Other nations seem to be managing reasonably well - what are they doing that we're not?
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Old 09-25-2022, 07:33 PM
 
16,164 posts, read 14,677,227 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slater View Post
It's unfortunate that in 21st Century America an "educated nation" also means a "drowning in debt until you're 50" nation. College is obviously a given for doctors, dentists, engineers, lawyers, etc., but there has to be a better way. Other nations seem to be managing reasonably well - what are they doing that we're not?
Something like 11 or 12% of student loan balances are owed by people in their 50s with an average balance of around $37K.

__________

Speaking of the portion who attended or graduated college.
I'll excuse the portion of that number who are recent borrowers. I'll also excuse those from the cadre those who owe but did no graduate, well, not excuse but discuss another time. Those per the cadre who graduated college but still owe significant money into their 50s by-in-large have done it wrong.
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Old 09-25-2022, 07:59 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slater View Post
It's unfortunate that in 21st Century America an "educated nation" also means a "drowning in debt until you're 50" nation. College is obviously a given for doctors, dentists, engineers, lawyers, etc., but there has to be a better way. Other nations seem to be managing reasonably well - what are they doing that we're not?
Taxing their population in order to provide free higher ed. The US under certain administrations has been cutting taxes, shutting down federal agencies, weakening others to the extent that they can barely function, and providing repeated rounds of tax cuts to the people who don't need them. The result is, that the middle class is carrying more of the public funding burden.
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Old 09-25-2022, 09:58 PM
 
10,894 posts, read 6,988,743 times
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Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Taxing their population in order to provide free higher ed. The US under certain administrations has been cutting taxes, shutting down federal agencies, weakening others to the extent that they can barely function, and providing repeated rounds of tax cuts to the people who don't need them. The result is, that the middle class is carrying more of the public funding burden.
Recall that funding of public colleges is a state function, not Federal. While I agree that states have cut their funding, we need to put the funding issue where it belongs.
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Old 09-25-2022, 10:02 PM
 
10,894 posts, read 6,988,743 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slater View Post
It's unfortunate that in 21st Century America an "educated nation" also means a "drowning in debt until you're 50" nation. College is obviously a given for doctors, dentists, engineers, lawyers, etc., but there has to be a better way. Other nations seem to be managing reasonably well - what are they doing that we're not?
Well, in a lot of cases, they filter out those who don't perform. I'd be all for free college or at least the first couple of years, if we filtered out those who didn't perform in high school. But even here in this forum, there's the constant response "but what about the late bloomers?"
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Old 09-25-2022, 11:24 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hollytree View Post
And your alternative is not going to college?
Not a USA college. Some are okay, many are continuation of HS or just expensive babysitting.

"Educated" happens well before HS, and instilling a life-long learning and servant attitude and skillset in your kids and students within your sphere of influence.

Most of my education came from me seeking out and listening to older people. They are fascinating, and very willing to share life lessons. I started that before Kindergarten age, out of necessity. My parents hated kids and suggested we go sit on the porch and talk to the retired neighbors. I also lived with, and worked very hard, alongside my grandparents (every chance I could earn fare for a 12 hr train ride.). My parent's would buy my fare home when they need help on their own farm.

School was very immaterial in my education. I was a teacher's aid for 4 classes each day in HS, then I left at noon for one of my three jobs I worked each day.

College was provided free by my employer (5x),. It was a lot of fun to learn, but did little to 'educate' me.

As a PT prof, and helping others with homeschool... I realize the academic content I deliver is important, but minimal to the 'education' I convey to my students. You've got to invest in the person. Life Education and inquisitiveness will flow freely from there.
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Old 09-26-2022, 07:21 AM
 
Location: Newburyport
446 posts, read 279,870 times
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Can I ask an honest question? I graduated college in the early aughts with an English degree. No, I’m not a teacher but I do make over six figures. Full disclosure: I did get an MBA, but I honestly don’t think it makes a huge difference in my field. Three of my other friends majored in Communications, Psych/Soc and Political Science and they all earn six figures plus. Can students no longer major in liberal arts like we did and still find good jobs? I see a lot of parents saying they won’t pay unless their student’s chosen degree is STEM or business and I’m sure part of that is due to the crazy tuition rates but is it also because you can no longer major in pretty much anything like we did and still end up with a well-paying job?

Last edited by Remy11; 09-26-2022 at 07:30 AM..
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