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Old 09-24-2022, 08:21 AM
 
Location: Arizona
2,353 posts, read 1,921,794 times
Reputation: 3512

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Some interesting examples:

"Majored in history, minored in psychology. I've been a truck driver for over 30 years. I decided after graduation that I did not want to teach. I make way more as a truck driver than I would as a teacher. I have worked with other drivers who have degrees in mining engineering and finance."

It's good that this person found a rewarding career, but he/she could have gotten their Commercial Driver's License WAY cheaper than a college degree.

https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/read...141603422.html
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Old 09-24-2022, 08:38 AM
 
10,889 posts, read 6,978,490 times
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So? They changed their mind. Happens all the time. Not everyone is meant for college. For those who don't want to go, don't go. The real and only issue is there are a lot of careers that require a college degree. And for those careers a college degree has gotten very expensive.
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Old 09-24-2022, 08:55 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
31,458 posts, read 51,868,936 times
Reputation: 40106
If you are not getting an inheritance, it is usually preferred to aquire as many funds, ASAP, then 'play' later. That can include going to college AFTER you retire at age 40 or so, often from being a skilled tradesman since age 16-18.

At least 1/2 my HS classmates went the direct labor route, rather than college. Interestingly, they have lived a very balanced and financially adequate life, with far more fun and recreation content. College grads are often way behind the lifelong earning curve until their 50s. By then... Fun is somewhat limited. Late age career changes are quite limited for most professionals, many who get outsourced are forced into labor or PT gigs. Some who've been skilled laborers for 30 yrs are physically no longer able to do demanding tasks. I find it best to be skilled and educated so you can do either. (If necessary).

I keep my CDL current. There are motorcoach driver positions offering $600/ day + $12,000 signing bonus. Peanuts for a previous CEO, but a good gig for many who may be qualified.
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Old 09-25-2022, 06:06 AM
 
Location: North Texas
272 posts, read 195,906 times
Reputation: 2161
Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
If you are not getting an inheritance, it is usually preferred to aquire as many funds, ASAP, then 'play' later. That can include going to college AFTER you retire at age 40 or so, often from being a skilled tradesman since age 16-18.

At least 1/2 my HS classmates went the direct labor route, rather than college. Interestingly, they have lived a very balanced and financially adequate life, with far more fun and recreation content. College grads are often way behind the lifelong earning curve until their 50s.

I tell my kids their first trip through college must be STEM or a major with a verifiable payoff -- there's no philosophy factory in our town. At least, this is required if they want help from us. The liberal arts subjects are worthy of exploration, but later when you have an established career and steady income. Going into debt for a degree in art appreciation makes as much sense as going into debt for advanced waterskiing lessons. You may become very skilled at it, but few will pay you for it. Save it for later.



One chose a degree with a 95% placement rate for grads. The other chose the trades (and oddly enough, just bought a ski boat. I guess he really was listening.)
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Old 09-25-2022, 07:54 AM
 
10,889 posts, read 6,978,490 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pullin2 View Post

One chose a degree with a 95% placement rate for grads. The other chose the trades (and oddly enough, just bought a ski boat. I guess he really was listening.)
Depending on the model, oddly enough, a ski boat may cost more than a college education.
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Old 09-25-2022, 09:32 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
31,458 posts, read 51,868,936 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
Depending on the model, oddly enough, a ski boat may cost more than a college education.
Presumably, (and likely) he already earned it.

Enjoy the journey, and enjoy today, if you are able


I hear some enjoy the 'college experience ', and others enjoy getting it over with so they can get on with life. Others have been enjoying and affording life instead of hanging around a college.
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Old 09-25-2022, 10:24 AM
 
Location: Arizona
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For the roughly 40% of college students that never graduate, at least they got to enjoy the "college experience". Kind of pricey, though.
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Old 09-25-2022, 10:34 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
98,534 posts, read 96,977,370 times
Reputation: 109842
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slater View Post
Some interesting examples:

"Majored in history, minored in psychology. I've been a truck driver for over 30 years. I decided after graduation that I did not want to teach. I make way more as a truck driver than I would as a teacher. I have worked with other drivers who have degrees in mining engineering and finance."

It's good that this person found a rewarding career, but he/she could have gotten their Commercial Driver's License WAY cheaper than a college degree.

https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/read...141603422.html
OP, what point are you trying to make? It's not clear. It's generally regarded as a positive thing to have an educated populace. People with higher education, whatever their career choices may be, make for better-informed voters. And truck driving is a tough job. The system is requiring they put in longer hours all the time. If some have found a good niche that doesn't stress them out too much, good for them. Most aren't able to do that. At least with a BA, a driver has options if s/he decides to bail and do a career change.
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Old 09-25-2022, 02:00 PM
 
2,365 posts, read 3,685,951 times
Reputation: 3585
Quote:
Originally Posted by pullin2 View Post
I tell my kids their first trip through college must be STEM or a major with a verifiable payoff -- there's no philosophy factory in our town. At least, this is required if they want help from us. The liberal arts subjects are worthy of exploration, but later when you have an established career and steady income. Going into debt for a degree in art appreciation makes as much sense as going into debt for advanced waterskiing lessons. You may become very skilled at it, but few will pay you for it. Save it for later.



One chose a degree with a 95% placement rate for grads. The other chose the trades (and oddly enough, just bought a ski boat. I guess he really was listening.)
I don't know of any degrees in art appreciation. There are degrees in art history, which is quite different.
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Old 09-25-2022, 02:11 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
31,458 posts, read 51,868,936 times
Reputation: 40106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
OP, what point are you trying to make? It's not clear. It's generally regarded as a positive thing to have an educated populace. ...
One also needs to consider "What is an educated populace?"

USA certainly does not have an educated electorate, or politicians educated and qualified to hold office. (But advertising works pretty well)

Colleges don't seem be 'educating' for responsible citizenry, careers, financial skills.
Colleges didn't educate for the vast number of entrepreneurs who choose to drop out of college, and get on with being successful.
Colleges don't seem to be improving the academic level of our USA K-12.

so... it's just possible... that 'college' (in the USA) does not equal and educated populace.
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