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Old 12-01-2022, 01:41 PM
SFX
 
Location: Tennessee
1,064 posts, read 567,844 times
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Yeah but remember, if American workers produced them shiny new iPhones, they would cost $10,000 each!
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Old 12-02-2022, 11:29 AM
 
Location: Baker City, Oregon
4,806 posts, read 7,272,372 times
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Any reasonably intelligent person could learn how to read cursive with about an hour of instruction. The main problem with reading cursive is bad handwriting - of course that same problem exists with printing, although less often.
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Old 12-02-2022, 11:50 AM
 
44,730 posts, read 23,252,326 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by karlsch View Post
Any reasonably intelligent person could learn how to read cursive with about an hour of instruction.
In a nutshell.
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Old 12-19-2022, 08:56 AM
 
Location: North Carolina
10,021 posts, read 16,623,198 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
There is a reason. Everybody needs to know how to write their own cursive signature because a cursive signature is a unique form of legal identification, especially if it's on a legally binding document. A cheque is a legal document. People printing their names in lieu of a cursive signature aren't submitting a legally acceptable signature unless their hand printed name at the time it's applied to a document is witnessed being printed by one or more witnesses who, as witnesses, must be able to sign their own signature in cursive on the same document.

"A hand printed X marks the spot" is for uneducated illiterates. It isn't good enough and nobody should be making excuses for why it isn't necessary for everybody to learn cursive writing, or at the very least learn how to cursively write their own unique signature for ID and other legal purposes.

.
This is 100% BS. I sign my name in print (not because I don't know cursive but because I prefer to print) and before I started doing that, I even asked a banker if it was okay to sign a name in print and she said "absolutely". I have bought two houses with a printed signature, and have been printing my signature for 15 years and never had a problem. I also printed my signature on my driver's license and passport and never had a problem. You don't know what you're talking about.

We're also not talking about "X marks the spot".
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Old 12-19-2022, 09:07 AM
 
Location: North Carolina
10,021 posts, read 16,623,198 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NORTY FLATZ View Post
Not learning cursive?

This is a much more sinister situation. It's called "incrementalism."

The constitution is in cursive. Guess what happens, when no one can read it....

Something to think about....
There will always be people who can read cursive, just as there are still some historians who study and can therefore read defunct languages. You think the Bible was originally written in a modern language still used today? And yet, somehow we still have translations readily available - imagine that!
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Old 12-19-2022, 02:10 PM
 
2,947 posts, read 2,180,623 times
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Cursive is utterly useless. I can write it, but I took all my school notes (grade school through MS) in print, because it's better.

Hopefully my kids will be able to use electronic tablets that will keep their notes better organized. I wasted a lot of time with paper notes because they lack the ability to cross-reference without staring at three or four pages at once. At least I made the intelligent decision (around 7th grade) to switch back from cursive to print, otherwise I would have wasted even more time.

I learned cursive in the 90's and I wish my teachers had spent that time on something worthwhile way back then! Today, it is almost criminally lazy to teach it to kids.

My kids are learning it in early elementary school, and I wish their teacher would spend that time on something more worthwhile like coding, early typing skills, addition maths or science instruction.

She's old and has a rich husband so she is oriented toward nostalgic BS like that, rather than focusing on making her students competitive in today's world.

It's not a HTDO, because it's not hard and doesn't take up much time, but it is annoying, considering how little instructional time kids in the USA get, already.
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Old 12-20-2022, 12:09 PM
 
44,040 posts, read 29,805,130 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RamenAddict View Post
You can teach someone how to read something without teaching them how to write it. I can read some Japanese but I never really practice writing kanji. They are separate skills. I say this as a former English teacher who left in part because we were spending so much time drilling middle schooler on writing cursive when there were other skills they really needed to learn.
That's how I felt as an occupational therapist in public schools. Teachers and parents were obsessed with it. I personally feel it's like art, some kids are really good at it, and some just aren't. I myself have ADHD and have horrible cursive writing (even printing isn't neat). In elemantary school I got straight A's but always a "D" in Penmanship. But today you can sit in a class at Princeton with a laptop in front of you and never have to write anything. I once worked in a class of emotionally disturbed kids in a special county school. These kids were a mess, their lives were in chaos, many of them couldn't read even at 12 years old. But when I asked the teachers what the kids most needed from me, working on handwriting was the answer I got.
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Old 12-20-2022, 02:16 PM
bu2
 
21,532 posts, read 12,068,105 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wac_432 View Post
Cursive is utterly useless. I can write it, but I took all my school notes (grade school through MS) in print, because it's better.

Hopefully my kids will be able to use electronic tablets that will keep their notes better organized. I wasted a lot of time with paper notes because they lack the ability to cross-reference without staring at three or four pages at once. At least I made the intelligent decision (around 7th grade) to switch back from cursive to print, otherwise I would have wasted even more time.

I learned cursive in the 90's and I wish my teachers had spent that time on something worthwhile way back then! Today, it is almost criminally lazy to teach it to kids.

My kids are learning it in early elementary school, and I wish their teacher would spend that time on something more worthwhile like coding, early typing skills, addition maths or science instruction.

She's old and has a rich husband so she is oriented toward nostalgic BS like that, rather than focusing on making her students competitive in today's world.

It's not a HTDO, because it's not hard and doesn't take up much time, but it is annoying, considering how little instructional time kids in the USA get, already.
Cursive exists for a reason. It is much, much faster than printing.

And there is a lot of signage you won't be able to read if you can't read cursive. I have a daughter who can't read it and a son who taught himself. Neither was taught it in school. He does use it.
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Old 12-20-2022, 02:18 PM
bu2
 
21,532 posts, read 12,068,105 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dane_in_LA View Post
It's been covered. Reading cursive isn't any harder than reading fraktur - if the person writing cursive has decent penmanship.

Incidentally, one of the first acts of the Constitutional Convention was to have printed copies made, in type. Because they understood - apparently unlike some in this thread - that the purpose of writing is communication. Substance over style.
There's plenty of printing that is hard to read. Penmanship is not tied to any form or any particular language.
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Old 12-20-2022, 03:06 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
10,021 posts, read 16,623,198 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bu2 View Post
Cursive exists for a reason. It is much, much faster than printing.
Yeah but that's only really a benefit if you're writing pages and pages by hand and no one does that anymore because it's completely unnecessary. Stenography is even faster than writing in cursive, but few people know how to do that, and no one is upset about that because it's not necessary for most people to know.

Quote:
And there is a lot of signage you won't be able to read if you can't read cursive.
Which is probably why you don't see much signage in cursive anymore - at least not in full cursive. I see a lot of fonts that have a handwritten look about them but most of the letters are actually not cursive. I'm sure there's still examples of signs with full cursive out there, but it's not like it's something that's going to be severely debilitating to functioning in the world. We are definitely still in somewhat of a transition as cursive is phased out, but eventually, it will cease to exist in the modern world and only be used by historians and genealogists, and even as a genealogist myself, I will still say there's nothing wrong with that.

Quote:
I have a daughter who can't read it and a son who taught himself. Neither was taught it in school. He does use it.
Which just proves that it's something that is easy to pick up on yourself and it's not necessary for it to be taught in school. Perhaps writing in cursive may require practice, but teaching yourself to read it as an adult would probably take a few hours, at most. All you have to do is look up a chart that shows the alphabet in print and in cursive, and a few example sentences, and maybe refer back to it occasionally. It's really not difficult, it's not like it's a completely different language.
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