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Old 11-19-2022, 11:53 PM
 
Location: MD's Eastern Shore
3,362 posts, read 4,227,712 times
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I feel some time in the future, these years will be erased from all of history because everything is being eliminated in favor of electronics. Everybody is getting dumber and can't figure out things on their own. Simple necessities like adding, subtracting, simple multiplication and jotting down notes aren't being taught.

What happens when the phone dies? The computer? The next advancement in tech? Everything you have will be lost! Thats what. But it doesn't matter in today's live for now world. No more storage for photos? Just erase and make room for the new. Note? Just print it up? Cursive? Thats for old people!

About these years being lost in the future? Perhaps it's a good thing so this era DOES get forgotten and not repeated!
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Old 11-20-2022, 08:24 AM
 
55 posts, read 8,185 times
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It’s pathetic when young people can’t even sign their name to a check. Writing in cursive is an important skill that doesn’t take too long to master. If schools won’t teach it, then parents (and grandparents) need to step up and help those children.
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Old 11-20-2022, 09:26 AM
 
Location: Morrisville, NC
8,941 posts, read 13,718,243 times
Reputation: 8639
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Why was cursive taught in middle school? What era was this in? It used to be part of gradeschool education.

I was just thinking about the implications of generations growing up not being able to read cursive, OP. Among other things, it means they wouldn't be able to read a handwritten note on, say, a birthday or Christmas card, or a thank-you note written by someone from an older generation in the family. Cursive now is like a secret code only people above a certain age can decipher.
As mentioned, reading cursive and being taught how to skillfully write it are two different things. I was never taught to write an ‘s’ as a fancy looking ‘f’ with an extra line but I managed to be able to read the founding documents on the wall of my high school just fine.
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Old 11-20-2022, 10:59 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
98,593 posts, read 97,046,108 times
Reputation: 109943
Quote:
Originally Posted by marlinfshr View Post
I feel some time in the future, these years will be erased from all of history because everything is being eliminated in favor of electronics. Everybody is getting dumber and can't figure out things on their own. Simple necessities like adding, subtracting, simple multiplication and jotting down notes aren't being taught.

What happens when the phone dies? The computer?
The next advancement in tech? Everything you have will be lost! Thats what. But it doesn't matter in today's live for now world. No more storage for photos? Just erase and make room for the new. Note? Just print it up? Cursive? Thats for old people!

About these years being lost in the future? Perhaps it's a good thing so this era DOES get forgotten and not repeated!
I was in a store the other day, where the cashier didn't know how to calculate the change due me. The bills from breaking a $20 he could figure out. It was the coinage he couldn't deal with. He actually pulled out his device to calculate the change on there.
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Old 11-20-2022, 11:48 AM
 
10,899 posts, read 6,988,743 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
I was in a store the other day, where the cashier didn't know how to calculate the change due me. The bills from breaking a $20 he could figure out. It was the coinage he couldn't deal with. He actually pulled out his device to calculate the change on there.
It's worse than that. Many fast food places cannot physically take an order if the system goes down. Even if you gave them a cash box and order pad, they can't do it. We were in Lowes the other day and you cannot pay with cash after 5 PM.
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Old 11-20-2022, 12:06 PM
 
Location: California
6,272 posts, read 7,079,976 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarahann25 View Post
It’s pathetic when young people can’t even sign their name to a check. Writing in cursive is an important skill that doesn’t take too long to master. If schools won’t teach it, then parents (and grandparents) need to step up and help those children.

Exactly, so I hope the parents/grandparents have a handwritten will so the young ones can learn to read it!
Sadly, the schools waste their time on CRT and porn but not productive skills.
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Old 11-20-2022, 12:37 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
10,021 posts, read 16,624,850 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cida View Post
I've seen articles bemoaning the decision to stop teaching cursive writing In school. But it hadn't occurred to me that this means that younger people literally can't read old manuscripts
Yeah, but unless they choose a career or hobby in history or genealogy, it's really not necessary, not for the majority of people. For those few who do choose it, they can learn cursive at that point.

Language evolves, and written language has been evolving since it was first developed. No one today bemoans the loss of mainstream understanding of Old English, which is basically a foreign language and not legible to most people. If someone pursues a career in Early Middle Ages England, then they might study Old English and become literate in it. The same will become true of cursive.


Quote:
How will they interpret the past?
No, most of these history students admitted, they could not read manuscripts. If they were assigned a research paper, they sought subjects that relied only on published sources. One student reshaped his senior honors thesis for this purpose; another reported that she did not pursue her interest in Virginia Woolf for an assignment that would have involved reading Woolf’s handwritten letters. In the future, cursive will have to be taught to scholars the way Elizabethan secretary hand or paleography is today.
https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine...istory/671246/
Exactly, the biggest problem right now is that history students who don't know cursive are being taught by professors/schools who haven't adapted to this yet. Cursive 101 should simply become a part of the curriculum of any history degree. The problem isn't that elementary schools are no longer teaching it, it's that university level history curriculums aren't.
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Old 11-20-2022, 12:53 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
10,021 posts, read 16,624,850 times
Reputation: 13600
Quote:
Originally Posted by marlinfshr View Post
Simple necessities like adding, subtracting, simple multiplication and jotting down notes aren't being taught.
That's not even remotely true. My sister in law is a teacher and a math major, and schools are absolutely still teaching basic math, including how to do it in one's head, or without a calculator. They actually teach kids how to do basic math in their heads with different methods than we were taught, and it's a big thing because parents struggle to understand the new methods, so they struggle to help their kids with their math homework. There was even a joke about this in The Incredibles ("why would they change math?!"). Obviously, this wouldn't be the case if they had simply stopped teaching basic math altogether.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
I was in a store the other day, where the cashier didn't know how to calculate the change due me. The bills from breaking a $20 he could figure out. It was the coinage he couldn't deal with. He actually pulled out his device to calculate the change on there.
If someone struggles to do basic math in their head, it's not because they weren't taught it, they probably just aren't very good at it and freeze up when put on the spot because they know they aren't very good at it. Some people's brains just aren't wired for doing math in their head. It's nothing to do with the education system, and also doesn't make them stupid.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarahann25 View Post
It’s pathetic when young people can’t even sign their name to a check. Writing in cursive is an important skill that doesn’t take too long to master. If schools won’t teach it, then parents (and grandparents) need to step up and help those children.
There is no law that you have to sign your name in cursive. Many people print their names when signing. There is no reason not knowing cursive means you can't sign a check.
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Old 11-20-2022, 01:00 PM
 
Location: On the Chesapeake
41,544 posts, read 54,134,346 times
Reputation: 55927
As a (retired) History teacher my main concern isn't that students "can't read original documents". As a retired educator my concern is that (and I saw much of this at the end of my career) is that the very discreet things that learning cursive imparts start to be lacking.

Those things are started off with fine motor skills and go onto brain development with the areas responsible for language, reasoning/higher order thinking and memory.

This is an opinion piece but hits the highlights with research cites:
https://www.columbiamissourian.com/o...20and%20typing.

This compares memory using writing and keyboarding (writing wins):
https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/b...ood-your-brain

More memory/processing impacts:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4274624/
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Old 11-20-2022, 02:07 PM
 
9,452 posts, read 5,342,241 times
Reputation: 18500
Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
As a (retired) History teacher my main concern isn't that students "can't read original documents". As a retired educator my concern is that (and I saw much of this at the end of my career) is that the very discreet things that learning cursive imparts start to be lacking.

Those things are started off with fine motor skills and go onto brain development with the areas responsible for language, reasoning/higher order thinking and memory.

This is an opinion piece but hits the highlights with research cites:
https://www.columbiamissourian.com/o...20and%20typing.

This compares memory using writing and keyboarding (writing wins):
https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/b...ood-your-brain

More memory/processing impacts:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4274624/
A century ago it was normal for Latin to be taught in classrooms, but it is pretty uncommon today. There is still a purpose for it for people who want to use it, but for the general population, it has no real utility. I would imagine that at that time when they started taking it out of the classroom, much of the arguments are similar. Nonetheless, people seem to get along fine without it.

I learned how to write cursive but I don’t think I can do it now. That is not to say that I don’t do other tasks that require fine and gross manipulation. I enjoy pottery for example and also like to sew, so there are plenty of other avenues for those things. Even playing video games requires a lot of fine and gross manipulation and it requires a good reaction time as well. Those are just a couple of examples. As things progress, certain tasks/practices fall out of favor while others come in that teach the same skills. People interested in the older ways are still able to learn them.
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