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Old 11-21-2022, 09:07 PM
 
Location: The Piedmont of North Carolina
3,510 posts, read 1,300,295 times
Reputation: 3979

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Quote:
Originally Posted by RamenAddict View Post
The point I’m trying to make is that technology changes and we have to move along with it.
I despise this argument! Just because something is new does not mean it is better!

Quote:
Originally Posted by RamenAddict
I haven’t felt like I have lost anything by not learning Latin, and I am fairly certain that kids today who never learn how to write cursive will feel the same way about it.
I attended a private middle school, (after my public school teacher told my parents that the public school system was failing me), that required learning Latin. I LOVED it! I still remember the first line I learned. "In pictura est puer Romanus", which translates to "In the picture is a Roman boy". I think it should be required for all students to learn a second language.

As someone who attended both private and public schools (graduated from a public high school, in 2018), the public school system is mediocre, and needs to be greatly improved upon. But, to be honest, as much as people like to blame the teachers for the lackluster results of education, I blame the students. Far too many "students" had no drive to learn, and were only at school because they were legally required to be. This creates other problems, as well.

As for cursive, I was taught it twice, in the third grade at a public school (2009), and the fifth grade of a private school (2011). I still use it everyday, as it is quicker than printing everything. And, yes, I am one of the few people, it seems, that writes anything down on paper. I find it to be good brain and hand muscle exercise.
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Old 11-21-2022, 09:09 PM
 
Location: The Piedmont of North Carolina
3,510 posts, read 1,300,295 times
Reputation: 3979
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dane_in_LA View Post
People are overstating the difficulty. Unless we're talking about reading poorly-written cursive, but that's not a failure on the reader's part, IMHO.
I agree! The only cursive letters that look different than their print counterparts are the letters "f" and "z".
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Old 11-21-2022, 10:04 PM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
28,425 posts, read 20,282,032 times
Reputation: 22843
Quote:
Originally Posted by grampaTom View Post
Well then their elementary school failed in THEIR job to teach cursive. We keep passing students who cannot spell, read, write or perform arithmetic at grade level.
Yup.
I still remember practicing cursive every morning in the second and third grades. Back then, proper hand and finger positioning was taught and practiced as well.
I always enjoyed the practice.

Learning cursive was easy for about half the kids and difficult for the other half. Pretty much the same as reading and doing basic math.
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Old 11-21-2022, 10:10 PM
 
Location: B.C., Canada
13,517 posts, read 12,301,938 times
Reputation: 31205
Quote:
Originally Posted by PA2UK View Post


There is no law that you have to sign your name in cursive. Many people print their names when signing. There is no reason not knowing cursive means you can't sign a check.
There is a reason. Everybody needs to know how to write their own cursive signature because a cursive signature is a unique form of legal identification, especially if it's on a legally binding document. A cheque is a legal document. People printing their names in lieu of a cursive signature aren't submitting a legally acceptable signature unless their hand printed name at the time it's applied to a document is witnessed being printed by one or more witnesses who, as witnesses, must be able to sign their own signature in cursive on the same document.

"A hand printed X marks the spot" is for uneducated illiterates. It isn't good enough and nobody should be making excuses for why it isn't necessary for everybody to learn cursive writing, or at the very least learn how to cursively write their own unique signature for ID and other legal purposes.

.
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Old 11-21-2022, 10:24 PM
 
Location: interior Alaska
6,435 posts, read 5,033,255 times
Reputation: 21502
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
There is a reason. Everybody needs to know how to write their own cursive signature because a cursive signature is a unique form of legal identification, especially if it's on a legally binding document. A cheque is a legal document. People printing their names in lieu of a cursive signature aren't submitting a legally acceptable signature unless their hand printed name at the time it's applied to a document is witnessed being printed by one or more witnesses who, as witnesses, must be able to sign their own signature in cursive on the same document
Where on Earth did you get this from?

It's not true, at least not in the US. Handwritten signatures in block letters are completely valid. I think you might be conflating this with machine-printed signatures, which do often require additional verification.
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Old 11-21-2022, 11:01 PM
 
Location: near bears but at least no snakes
26,035 posts, read 26,106,863 times
Reputation: 48587
I still think everyone should at least be able to write their name. Learning to write or to read it only takes a short time. No one needs to have perfect handwriting, just be able to generally read and write. No drilling, mostly it could just take an explanation that the letters are joined together, they slant, and that's about it. A little bit of practice everyone once in a while would be sufficient. Having to "translate" something in writing every so often so they don't forget.
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Old 11-21-2022, 11:23 PM
 
44,730 posts, read 23,252,326 times
Reputation: 27171
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
There is a reason. Everybody needs to know how to write their own cursive signature because a cursive signature is a unique form of legal identification, especially if it's on a legally binding document. A cheque is a legal document. People printing their names in lieu of a cursive signature aren't submitting a legally acceptable signature...
I beg leave to doubt this. Is there case law or other legal documentation to support it?
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Old 11-22-2022, 12:36 AM
 
3,140 posts, read 1,774,024 times
Reputation: 6378
Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
It's worse than that. Many fast food places cannot physically take an order if the system goes down. Even if you gave them a cash box and order pad, they can't do it. We were in Lowes the other day and you cannot pay with cash after 5 PM.
Just curious... is that store in a high(er) crime area?
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Old 11-22-2022, 06:09 AM
 
Location: EPWV
17,157 posts, read 8,361,683 times
Reputation: 18600
Quote:
Originally Posted by E-Twist View Post
Machines sort the letters and amazingly can read most cursive.
Ok, at least you said “most” cursive.
Like I’m saying some have and some may not. Budgetary constraints for those, I suppose.
Maybe some POs have them and some don’t? That’s was an issue that was brought up some time ago but don’t recall from where. Yes, it’s nice that most POs can do what you say. I know that there is zip code reading by machines but if there’s not a full zip on the letter, or if the machine can’t pick up the code because of smudges, or whatever, it may not get delivered unless someone can read the rest of it. I’ve worked in such an info center and have seen messages get delivered to the wrong address and I was able to look something up to get the correct letter/number for the company. How’s that for human intervention?

Last edited by cat1116; 11-22-2022 at 06:30 AM..
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Old 11-22-2022, 06:25 AM
 
Location: EPWV
17,157 posts, read 8,361,683 times
Reputation: 18600
Isn’t knowing Latin supposed to help people in the medical and law fields?
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