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Old 06-05-2023, 11:04 AM
 
77,463 posts, read 59,551,665 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moguldreamer View Post
‘Mississippi miracle’: Kids’ reading scores have soared in Deep South states

https://apnews.com/article/reading-s...37db2fb95d5004



Mississippi went from being ranked the second-worst state in 2013 for fourth-grade reading to 21st in 2022. Louisiana and Alabama also improved substantially. Those three states were the only states to see modest gains in fourth-grade reading during the pandemic, which saw massive learning setbacks in most other states.





Experts credit the improvement to phonics. Legislatures in those states passed laws to emphasize phonics. https://apnews.com/article/phonics-s...15b01b83bb1066

One wonders why it requires elected representatives to step in and pass laws to force change.
Says MS is up to 21st but the graph makes them look like they're in the top 3-5.

Really badly put together article by AP.
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Old 06-05-2023, 11:08 AM
 
77,463 posts, read 59,551,665 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
Where are those who typically condemn such statistics as the NAEP as being liberal hogwash?

And, to be honest, when you're at the bottom, the only way is up.
It would be nice to see all of the grades scores and the other economic classification as well.

We're getting <5% of the story due to this niche focus, how is the other 95%+ doing?
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Old 06-05-2023, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
49,893 posts, read 23,639,645 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mathguy View Post
It would be nice to see all of the grades scores and the other economic classification as well.

We're getting <5% of the story due to this niche focus, how is the other 95%+ doing?
Agreed
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Old 06-05-2023, 01:36 PM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale
767 posts, read 445,553 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
And, to be honest, when you're at the bottom, the only way is up.
I can’t believe it, but I’m actually going to agree with you here. I have to wonder what had to be done for the reading test scores to “soar”, such results “soaring” out of nowhere usually involve some degree of fudging.

Being an airline employee, I have used my benefits as well as my own money to visit most of the Essential Air Service subsidized airports, and their associated “cities” (quotes because they are small towns) in Mississippi, with the exception of Tupelo (KTUP), which is on my domestic list of places to visit. Once you visit the state and see the current conditions, it’s very obvious what the problems facing are. But what is less obvious, is how exactly to fix them.
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Old 06-05-2023, 01:53 PM
 
Location: NE Mississippi
25,224 posts, read 16,835,130 times
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Reading and writing literacy is connected to verbal literacy.
As long as Smith is pronounced Smif it will not be spelled correctly and may not be recognized when it is seen.
There is no such word as spo-da, so "supposed to" goes unrecognized.
Little progress was made here in Mississippi until children began to correct each other and admire those who speak well. But to this very day, we White people dare not describe a young Black person as "well spoken". If we do, we are considered racist.
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Old 06-05-2023, 03:07 PM
 
4,340 posts, read 4,173,804 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Listener2307 View Post
Reading and writing literacy is connected to verbal literacy.
As long as Smith is pronounced Smif it will not be spelled correctly and may not be recognized when it is seen.
There is no such word as spo-da, so "supposed to" goes unrecognized.
Little progress was made here in Mississippi until children began to correct each other and admire those who speak well. But to this very day, we White people dare not describe a young Black person as "well spoken". If we do, we are considered racist.
I used to put the name of a fictional student on the board and ask students to pronounce it:

I Mona Collitch

Sometimes a clever student would guess right away that it was really "I'm going to college." Then I would talk about the importance of correct diction, using the example "Life's a beach!" It tied in with the phonics lessons that I would do in French where I would tell them that 1) if you say it wrong, you're saying something else, (corollary: it's usually something vulgar or inappropriate), and 2) the consonants give a word its structure and the vowels give it its meaning. I would model the different consonant phonemes with a series of vowels to illustrate what I meant: p_t, for example. Then I would do the same thing in French, showing the wide variety of homophones which give learners fits.

Comparative linguistics is part of the national standards for second language acquisition. In the context where I taught, it was part of my personal agenda of empowering students by increasing their literacy skills in English while they learned the rudiments of French.

Going back to your examples, I would add "fidna" for "fixing to," a Southern colloquialism that means "about to" + activity for any unfamiliar with Faulkner's native tongue.
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Old 06-05-2023, 03:23 PM
 
Location: NMB, SC
41,123 posts, read 16,878,230 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mathguy View Post
It would be nice to see all of the grades scores and the other economic classification as well.

We're getting <5% of the story due to this niche focus, how is the other 95%+ doing?

Here ya go. Looks like they went old school...back to phonics.
Maybe there's hope yet that literacy levels will increase.

https://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/reading/
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Old 06-11-2023, 07:39 PM
 
Location: 'greater' Buffalo, NY
5,290 posts, read 3,787,889 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mathguy View Post
Says MS is up to 21st but the graph makes them look like they're in the top 3-5.

Really badly put together article by AP.
I didn't read the article, but the OP mentions (or at least implies) across-the-board 4th grade reading stats, while the graph adds the 'low-income' qualifier.
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Old 06-12-2023, 07:23 AM
 
16,807 posts, read 16,043,838 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lhpartridge View Post
I would add that there is a significant subset of these children who don't have regular conversation with any adults, so their speech patterns don't get corrected as they would through regular discourse.

I'm sure that you've gone through the professional development that focuses on parent-child discourse with the example of going to the grocery store. Some parents engage with their children, making every trip a lesson. Others discipline their children for asking too many questions. The topic of the PD included the example of teaching about eggplants, their color, their classification as a vegetable, and more.

I saw this in action yesterday when a mother of a young child, probably 4 years old, asked him how to spell "milk" as he was riding through the store on the bottom of the buggy. She spelled it out and reinforced the "l" sound as she repeated the word.

Contrast that with the mother of one of my students who the custodian for my classroom for a while. She came in to ask one day how to spell the same word that she had written down for a report. She had it spelled "merk" because that was how it is pronounced in her peer group, like the first part of "meerkat". When you don't hear the "l" in "milk," how are you supposed to know it's there?

When the parents also have a fifth-grade level vocabulary, then their children are at a disadvantage. This is one of the reasons that high-quality preschool is so important -- to catch children while their brains are still malleable enough to take advantage of the language-learning window that begins to close by kindergarten age.
I have to say that, from a phonics perspective, the Leapfrog phonics videos are about as easy as it gets. Just pop one of those videos in during quiet time and the kids will absorb it.

Once they get their phonics down, learning to read becomes so much easier.

Definitely the home environment plays a significant role in children's vocabularies, or lack thereof, but if the goal is to get them reading, I totally recommend Leapfrog.

Granted, we read to our kids from the time they were tiny babies and they were around lots of adults who talked to them and gave them one on one attention. I took them to Mommy & Me type classes, library story time and they attended high quality private preschool in addition to all of the reading that we did at home. So our kids had a very good base to build on going into the Leapfrog phonics videos - those worked literally overnight for us.
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Old 06-12-2023, 08:02 AM
 
9,952 posts, read 6,530,104 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EDS_ View Post
1. One of my daughter's good friends was a K teacher. One year, opening day 2021 IIRC, two kids showed up wearing diapers.

2. Over '20 and '21/covid many inner city kids, overwhelmingly members of the low word count cadre you noted, literally regressed in reading and verbal skills.

3. Somehow/someway we need to reach the point where we can have honest discussions about race/culture and K-12 underperformance. Until then we will continue to spin our collective wheels.
COVID was VERY hard for kids requiring special ed services. My neighbor’s kid was one of the preschoolers during the pandemic and has an IEP for I think a developmental delay and some other issues. I think she was wearing pull ups into kindergarten, and it was absolutely not due to a lack of trying by her mom. I live in your standard suburban neighborhood. The child did take advantage of the preschool, but I think it was virtual for pre-k and that is just not a very good option for that age group. She also sent the child to a special summer camp for kids with her disorder along with specialized therapy. However, she complained a lot about how the pandemic made it nearly impossible for her to help her daughter improve.

Otherwise, my best friend has twins in middle school and they still have a fairly significant speech delay. I am sure lack of access to regular speech therapy was no help. They are bright girls, but their speech is just not where it should be.

Unfortunately, I think the pandemic harmed everyone, not just inner city kids. Other kids at least had other resources, while kids in the inner cities may not have had any.
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