Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-29-2023, 10:16 PM
 
Location: Southern MN
11,912 posts, read 8,238,106 times
Reputation: 44322

Advertisements

To be expected as expectations of the impossible under insurmountable conditions increase. I have nothing but profound sympathy for people still trying to teach.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-30-2023, 10:16 AM
 
19,493 posts, read 17,729,533 times
Reputation: 17025
Quote:
Originally Posted by StarryKnight1 View Post
Well, it confirms that this “soaring” never really got off the ground in the first place.

TL;DR: It was all BS and lies.
That says 7% of scores across a few schools are suspect. I'm not claiming to have a full resolution into this or a crystal ball but the report does not point to overall results being, "all BS and lies."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-30-2023, 05:56 PM
 
Location: Vermont
9,195 posts, read 4,982,351 times
Reputation: 17384
Reading skill is critical. Instilling a life-long love of reading is about the best thing you could do for a child.

I have volunteered to read to kids in a Head Start program to help them prepare for kindergarten. It's a United Way program and when I saw the ad, I thought "THIS is a good use of my time in retirement." Waiting to hear back from the contact.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-31-2023, 05:01 PM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale
772 posts, read 451,983 times
Reputation: 1345
Quote:
Originally Posted by EDS_ View Post
That says 7% of scores across a few schools are suspect. I'm not claiming to have a full resolution into this or a crystal ball but the report does not point to overall results being, "all BS and lies."
Personally, I’m not holding my breath. Mississippi is the poorest state in the country and it shows.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-02-2023, 11:19 AM
 
307 posts, read 161,149 times
Reputation: 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by moguldreamer View Post
Because you are a retired teacher and administrator, please describe situations where phonics is contraindicated for a specific learner.
It is never contraindicated. It is of several important competencies required to learn to read Scarborough's rope is an excellent visual. The problem arose from fulty research that led to a whole language and balnced literacy movement that was never effective but ended up having great marketing behind it. Even the ways comprehension in balanced literacy programs were some of the least effective. The big movement on returning (because these techniques and research are not new) has come because educators have been pushing hard and Covid closures really exposed how reading skills have degraded even in higher performing schools. Also, parents got on board and joined educators in advocating for change.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-02-2023, 01:51 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
50,180 posts, read 23,824,373 times
Reputation: 32577
Quote:
Originally Posted by OtterTrees View Post
It is never contraindicated. It is of several important competencies required to learn to read Scarborough's rope is an excellent visual. The problem arose from fulty research that led to a whole language and balnced literacy movement that was never effective but ended up having great marketing behind it. Even the ways comprehension in balanced literacy programs were some of the least effective. The big movement on returning (because these techniques and research are not new) has come because educators have been pushing hard and Covid closures really exposed how reading skills have degraded even in higher performing schools. Also, parents got on board and joined educators in advocating for change.
the bolded...what does that even mean? Sounds like something that looks great in a published paper. But how many parents were involved? They all agreed on one course of action?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-02-2023, 08:20 PM
 
307 posts, read 161,149 times
Reputation: 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
the bolded...what does that even mean? Sounds like something that looks great in a published paper. But how many parents were involved? They all agreed on one course of action?
The Sold A Story Podvast is a great place to start. But, I have seen many parents in the past 2 years ask very specific questions about how reading is taught and attending school committee meetings to ask about curriculum, Parents of children with reding challenges such as dylexia have been particularyly vocal. There are currently 32 states in the process of passing or have passed legislation regarding literacy. It is one of the few cases where the government intervention is leading to positive change in education.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-18-2023, 01:43 PM
 
7,128 posts, read 3,957,274 times
Reputation: 16289
Time for a happy dance!

Quote:
Columbia quietly walks away from Teachers College project that ruined countless lives

By Post Editorial Board

Published Sep. 17, 2023, 6:33 p.m. ET

Columbia University is trying to quietly walk away from a disaster it imposed on generations of American children.

The least we can do is call out the damage done.

Just before the Labor Day weekend, Columbia announced that it’s “dissolving” the Teachers College Reading and Writing Project and sending its creator, Lucy Calkins, off on indefinite sabbatical.

For decades, Calkins and her colleagues pushed “literacy” programs based on ideology, not science, programs that failed the children who most needed help.

Her “balanced literacy” approach gave short shrift to phonics — by teaching children to look at pictures and guess words, for example, instead of sounding them out — and failed to foster the building of knowledge and vocabulary vital to learning the love of reading.

Columbia’s decision comes months after Chancellor David Banks pulled the plug on the Calkins-friendly approach once used by nearly half of NYC public schools.

Indeed, the drive toward “evidence-based” instruction has seen districts across the nation reject the Teachers College approach.

So Columbia’s move is essentially just recognizing reality.

But it doesn’t recognize the school’s guilt.

If Columbia University could be held liable for the harm done to generations of American kids, it would lose its entire $13 billion endowment and more. The least it could do is offer an abject apology.

Update: Since this editorial posted, Columbia’s press office has contacted us to note that Lucy Callkins is not a Columbia prof, but rather a Teachers College one, and to insist that closing the Reading and Writing Project was entirely the decision of Teachers College, a separate institution from Columbia — just like Barnard.
https://nypost.com/2023/09/17/columb...untless-lives/
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-22-2023, 01:20 PM
 
Location: Oregon, formerly Texas
10,004 posts, read 7,145,779 times
Reputation: 17096
Something that Mississippi did that people take for granted is that they cracked down on truancy. They started making absenteeism have a consequence. Just being in class helped a lot.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-27-2023, 07:03 PM
 
37,315 posts, read 59,511,430 times
Reputation: 25330
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Thank you! At least the legislatures did step in, and their involvement paid off. Maybe other states will take note.


I wonder if the 1st and 2nd-grade teachers (and maybe the kindergarten teachers as well, since reading is now being taught at that level) had to get training to teach phonics, after the requirement became law.
It wouldn’t surprise me
Phonics like grammar for older grades is not something really taught in educational classes

Big article in NYTimes this week about a University that closed down its partnership with a university professor’s non-profit that didn’t use phonics to teach reading
Apparently that professor was at one time considered a top authority in how to teach reading
Not su much since data mining shows using phonics has better results in teaching reading and improving reading scores

My daughter taught in elementary grades and believes in phonics but lots of districts don’t and teachers have less and less authority to teach using their preferred methods—
Districts really dictate what happens hour by hour, day by day
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top