Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
2,500,000 members. Thank you!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Closed Thread Start New Thread
 
Old 10-04-2023, 05:41 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
49,889 posts, read 23,631,391 times
Reputation: 32384

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by lhpartridge View Post
...

...

Instead we default to a variety of practices, most of which are based on the choices of parents, who may have no understanding whatsoever of child development. All it takes to be a parent is for a guy to have an orgasm within reach of a ripe ovum. The resulting child is the one whose next 60 months of experiences will ready them for school adequately or not.

If parents aren't adequately preparing their children for formal education in the 60 months granted to them, what are the schools to do?
Very good points.

But there is a school-based problem, as well -- teachers who basically just want to teach however they were taught. And some who are willing to test new techniques are sometimes castigated by their colleagues.

 
Old 10-04-2023, 07:04 PM
gg
 
Location: Pittsburgh
26,137 posts, read 25,686,856 times
Reputation: 17378
I don't understand this thread. There are countless upon countless successful public schools. Wealthier suburb schools are doing great for example. That being said, why are we lumping so many public schools together? I know where I live most of the suburban schools are doing great and thriving. City schools aren't doing as well, but some are okay.

Where are all these failed schools?
 
Old 10-04-2023, 08:34 PM
 
Location: New York NY
5,500 posts, read 8,660,907 times
Reputation: 12626
Quote:
Originally Posted by gg View Post
I don't understand this thread. There are countless upon countless successful public schools. Wealthier suburb schools are doing great for example. That being said, why are we lumping so many public schools together? I know where I live most of the suburban schools are doing great and thriving. City schools aren't doing as well, but some are okay.

Where are all these failed schools?
Thanks for asking that question. Because most parents don’t feel that their schools are failing. About 80% of
lparents are OK with the public school their kid goes to. See here — https://reason.org/commentary/parent...0not%20unusual.

The rising dissatisfaction about public schools IMO is:
— highly partisan and ideological more than purely academic
— highly tied to the poverty and social disfunction too many kids face
— only partially about school choice
— and my impression that many parents really don’t know the best way for their kids to learn; whether it’s a vaunted charter, a super selective magnet, well-thought of suburban system, a private religious school, or the traditional neighborhood school, lots of parents just end up making a bad choice that’s difficult to remedy

Fixing all those things takes time and intelligence more than just money, space, and a few disgruntled parents. Schooling is a complex endeavor, and those who think that “choice” will help end underperforming schools are short-sighted. There are plenty of private and charter schools that are awful.
 
Old 10-04-2023, 08:50 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
27,147 posts, read 28,189,169 times
Reputation: 24661
Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
Anyone can point out the problems. Where are your substantitve -- not vague -- suggestions for improvement?
Maybe we are deluding ourselves into believing that everybody in our society was meant to achieve academic success.

Americans should learn to accept that differences in academic performance and in socioeconomic outcomes are inevitable in society.

The evidence that this is the case is overwhelming.
 
Old 10-04-2023, 08:55 PM
 
Location: On the Chesapeake
44,721 posts, read 59,606,344 times
Reputation: 60248
Quote:
Originally Posted by gg View Post
I don't understand this thread. There are countless upon countless successful public schools. Wealthier suburb schools are doing great for example. That being said, why are we lumping so many public schools together? I know where I live most of the suburban schools are doing great and thriving. City schools aren't doing as well, but some are okay.

Where are all these failed schools?
You're in Pennsylvania where a visceral hate for public schools and teachers are ingrained in the DNA, no matter how good or bad the school happens to be.
 
Old 10-04-2023, 09:24 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
49,889 posts, read 23,631,391 times
Reputation: 32384
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
Maybe we are deluding ourselves into believing that everybody in our society was meant to achieve academic success.

Americans should learn to accept that differences in academic performance and in socioeconomic outcomes are inevitable in society.

The evidence that this is the case is overwhelming.
Rather, my view is that success is different for different kids.

We shouldn't throw away human beings...because even after we throw them away they will be with us.
 
Old 10-04-2023, 09:34 PM
gg
 
Location: Pittsburgh
26,137 posts, read 25,686,856 times
Reputation: 17378
Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
You're in Pennsylvania where a visceral hate for public schools and teachers are ingrained in the DNA, no matter how good or bad the school happens to be.
I don't think that would be true. Certainly not where I live. My district is top notch, but man teachers make a fortune here. Nonetheless, there are a lot of very good schools in the Pittsburgh suburbs.
 
Old 10-04-2023, 10:27 PM
 
Location: A coal patch in Pennsyltucky
10,181 posts, read 10,419,510 times
Reputation: 12473
Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
And we would want to go back to a failed system of catholic-type schools for what reason?
I went to public schools but had some family members who went to Catholic school. My mother went to Catholic grade school that was taught by nuns and hated it.

I grew up in a small town with a Catholic high school. People traveled from other surrounding towns to go to this school. Some of them were Protestant and Jewish. The perception was the Catholic high school provided a better education. There were few nuns or priests teaching by the time I was in high school in the early 1970s. This high school is still operating, but has a much smaller enrollment. Many of the Catholic schools have closed and/or consolidated. Some of the few Catholic high schools that are left have outstanding reputations. Examples are Central Catholic and Oakland Catholic in Pittsburgh.

Why do you consider it to be a failed system of Catholic-type schools?
 
Old 10-04-2023, 11:17 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
49,889 posts, read 23,631,391 times
Reputation: 32384
Quote:
Originally Posted by villageidiot1 View Post
I went to public schools but had some family members who went to Catholic school. My mother went to Catholic grade school that was taught by nuns and hated it.

I grew up in a small town with a Catholic high school. People traveled from other surrounding towns to go to this school. Some of them were Protestant and Jewish. The perception was the Catholic high school provided a better education. There were few nuns or priests teaching by the time I was in high school in the early 1970s. This high school is still operating, but has a much smaller enrollment. Many of the Catholic schools have closed and/or consolidated. Some of the few Catholic high schools that are left have outstanding reputations. Examples are Central Catholic and Oakland Catholic in Pittsburgh.

Why do you consider it to be a failed system of Catholic-type schools?
"In the past two decades in the United States, more than 1,600 Catholic elementary and secondary schools have closed". Is that a success story?
 
Old 10-05-2023, 12:37 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
34,495 posts, read 57,246,361 times
Reputation: 45741
This speaks of success!
the United States spent $37,400 per FTE student, which was more than double the average of OECD countries ($18,400; in constant 2021 U.S. dollars).
And we (USA) rank 'average' amoung our peers (#16 of 37)

'Average' is good enough for some

If your business needs to hire for success, just be very thankful for 'green cards' (applicants educated elsewhere).

Money / spending does not assure quality and effective EDU. The USA provides adequate data of that metric.
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top