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Old 10-13-2023, 06:20 PM
 
7,029 posts, read 3,363,704 times
Reputation: 13442

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The Impact of Public School Choice: Evidence from Los Angeles’ Zones of Choice

That's the title of a newly accepted manuscript forthcoming in the prestigious Quarterly Journal of Economics https://academic.oup.com/qje/advance...jad052/7304429

Here's the abstract (emphasis added):
"Does a school district that expands school choice provide better outcomes for students than a neighborhood-based assignment system? This paper studies the Zones of Choice (ZOC) program, a school choice initiative of the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) that created small high school markets in some neighborhoods but left attendance zone boundaries in place throughout the rest of the district. We study market-level impacts of choice on student achievement and college enrollment using a differences-in-differences design. Student outcomes in ZOC markets increased markedly, narrowing achievement and college enrollment gaps between ZOC neighborhoods and the rest of the district. The effects of ZOC are larger for schools exposed to more competition, supporting the notion that competition is a key channel. Demand estimates suggest families place substantial weight on schools’ academic quality, providing schools with competition-induced incentives to improve their effectiveness. The evidence demonstrates that public school choice programs have the potential to improve school quality and reduce neighborhood-based disparities in educational opportunity."
This looks quite promising.
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Old 10-22-2023, 05:16 PM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale
767 posts, read 445,179 times
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They didn’t need a study to tell me that people flock to good schools in good neighborhoods and at least attempt to avoid the ghetto like the plague. I don’t think people are going to school in ghetto areas of their own volition.
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Old 10-23-2023, 10:37 AM
 
3,140 posts, read 2,628,508 times
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Quote:
The evidence demonstrates that public school choice programs have the potential to improve school quality and reduce neighborhood-based disparities in educational opportunity."
The disparities will still be there, but they won't be geographically-linked. My kids attend a SOC and the big filter is the fact that every parent has to get their butts up and drive their kid to and from school--or find a carpool, vanpool, aftercare, etc. That immediately eliminates uninvolved parents, which is the primary driver of unsuccessful students. So the filter with SOCs will still be income/wealth/free time/interest in your kid's education, but it will decouple from geography as the schools will no longer be districted.

You could say that low income people, who are educationally-focused, will make time to drive their kids to/from school and might have better opportunities in a SOC, but because of involved parenting, they would be successful even in low-performing schools. However, the chance to go to schools with fewer disruptive students will probably enhance their educational experience.

SOC for everyone will certainly separate the wheat from the chaff, allowing the few good students--who are forced to be in bad schools due to economic constraints--to flee those bad schools. This will crash the scores of already-low-testing schools. Desirable SOCs will see good performance. Then we can have more asinine studies like this one confirming everything that parents and educators already know.

I think it's a good idea, but it will drive the social justice crusaders right up the wall and around the bend as people use SOC for all to segregate themselves.
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Old 10-23-2023, 12:50 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
27,148 posts, read 28,189,169 times
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We need to accept the fact that the United States will always have significant differences in academic outcomes among its student population.

It does no good to be in denial about this.

Most societies have long accepted these kinds of human differences.
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Old 10-23-2023, 12:57 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
49,890 posts, read 23,631,391 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
We need to accept the fact that the United States will always have significant differences in academic outcomes among its student population.

It does no good to be in denial about this.
I don't think anyone is in denial about that. Certainly no educators I ever knew. What we are in denial about is that the old status quo -- the separate but equal type of thinking -- is the way it should be. Separate but equal is never equal, and it does not contribute to the concept of a 'united states of America' (lower case intentional).

We also tend to deny that taxpayers should pay for other than public educational institutions. It's not unlike where I live. In my large sub-development, all the streets are paid for and maintained by the county. In a neighboring development, which is gated, that's private and the gated community pays for their streets.
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Old 10-23-2023, 01:04 PM
 
19,381 posts, read 17,568,796 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
We need to accept the fact that the United States will always have significant differences in academic outcomes among its student population.

It does no good to be in denial about this.

Most societies have long accepted these kinds of human differences.
It's that simple. Some parents and kids will find a way others won't.
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Old 10-23-2023, 01:09 PM
 
3,140 posts, read 2,628,508 times
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I think the biggest friction comes from being a multi-cultural society. Different cultures have different values. You see those starkly reflected in educational attainment. Yes, there’s some rank-crossing that goes on, since any household that values education (over all else) is going to produce high-performing students.

I think that SOC will help smooth out this friction as it will blur the geographical edges of good and bad school districts, which will allow people from a culture that prizes education to live next to people whose culture does not, without worrying about their kids having to attend inferior schools. So some of the pressure to geographically segregate will ease. Schools will likely become more segregated, but I think that’s not so problematic.
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Old 10-23-2023, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
49,890 posts, read 23,631,391 times
Reputation: 32384
Quote:
Originally Posted by wac_432 View Post
I think the biggest friction comes from being a multi-cultural society. Different cultures have different values. You see those starkly reflected in educational attainment. Yes, there’s some rank-crossing that goes on, since any household that values education (over all else) is going to produce high-performing students.

I think that SOC will help smooth out this friction as it will blur the geographical edges of good and bad school districts, which will allow people from a culture that prizes education to live next to people whose culture does not, without worrying about their kids having to attend inferior schools. So some of the pressure to geographically segregate will ease. Schools will likely become more segregated, but I think that’s not so problematic.
uh huh
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Old 10-24-2023, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
37,696 posts, read 40,674,551 times
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Hire Asian parents to teach. Whatever they do with their own kids seems to work.
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Old 10-24-2023, 12:45 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
34,495 posts, read 57,246,361 times
Reputation: 45741
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
Hire Asian parents to teach. Whatever they do with their own kids seems to work.
Or... better yet...

Outsource USA EDU to a nation who delivers consistent superior results ! (Asian country or not)

There are plenty, and they would LOVE the USA wages, or even 50% of what is spent on USA EDU / student.

USA parents and students would have a bit of an 'adjustment' .

And of course the USA EDU system 'ex-employees' would need tweaking / retraining.
7-8million employees reallocated to economically 'productive' contributions!*

Many in the USA have BTDT since 1980's.

*The U.S. Education System Isn’t Giving Students What Employers Need
https://hbr.org/2021/05/the-u-s-educ...employers-need
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