Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
2,500,000 members. Thank you!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-06-2023, 02:27 PM
 
35,446 posts, read 17,545,482 times
Reputation: 50364

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by TaxPhd View Post
Do you agree with the policy of no score below 50%, even if 0% of the work is completed? How about no enforcement of attendance?
Here's the reason that policy came about to not give grades below a 50. Because a student could, and often did, really blow a major test. Really blow it, and get like a 20.

And then mathematically that can put the student in a place where there's no way they can pass the semester, even if they score very very well on the rest of the work.

And that does no one any good. To mathematically kick a kid out of passing a semester based on one major test, is a waste of everyone's time and money, especially for a kid who becomes motivated and masters the material.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-06-2023, 02:41 PM
 
Location: On the Chesapeake
44,741 posts, read 59,631,382 times
Reputation: 60264
Quote:
Originally Posted by TaxPhd View Post
Do you agree with the policy of no score below 50%, even if 0% of the work is completed? How about no enforcement of attendance?
At the end of the day it doesn't matter whether classroom based people agree with it or not. When School Boards adopt the policy, any policy, then the employees from the Superintendent down have to contractually follow it.

Did I agree when the Maryland State Department of Education downgraded an attack on a staff member from automatic Request for Expulsion to a ten day suspension with the possibility of it only being five days is the attacker and victim go through restorative counseling? No.

A better one, since I wasn't an Administrator, was did I agree when Persistent Class Disruption went from removing the student from class to having the teacher contact the parents three times before it became an Administrative referral? No. But I still had to follow the requirements.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-06-2023, 02:43 PM
 
10,294 posts, read 5,456,309 times
Reputation: 10340
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClaraC View Post
Here's the reason that policy came about to not give grades below a 50. Because a student could, and often did, really blow a major test. Really blow it, and get like a 20.

And then mathematically that can put the student in a place where there's no way they can pass the semester, even if they score very very well on the rest of the work.

And that does no one any good. To mathematically kick a kid out of passing a semester based on one major test, is a waste of everyone's time and money, especially for a kid who becomes motivated and masters the material.

When I was in high school, I didn't have a single class where failure of a single test/assignment, even with a score of zero, would have resulted in failing the class. Neither did my two children. If that is happening, it would seem like an issue with specific courses grading schemes, and wouldn't necessitate such a broad policy.


Do you really think that what was described in the OP is what you're describing above?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-06-2023, 02:45 PM
 
10,294 posts, read 5,456,309 times
Reputation: 10340
Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
At the end of the day it doesn't matter whether classroom based people agree with it or not. When School Boards adopt the policy, any policy, then the employees from the Superintendent down have to contractually follow it.

Did I agree when the Maryland State Department of Education downgraded an attack on a staff member from automatic Request for Expulsion to a ten day suspension with the possibility of it only being five days is the attacker and victim go through restorative counseling? No.

A better one, since I wasn't an Administrator, was did I agree when Persistent Class Disruption went from removing the student from class to having the teacher contact the parents three times before it became an Administrative referral? No. But I still had to follow the requirements.

Did you understand from my post that I was confused about teachers having to follow policies?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-06-2023, 02:47 PM
 
12,522 posts, read 8,740,507 times
Reputation: 34281
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtab4994 View Post
But if it pops up more frequently, might be a good sign that things are starting to change. Lots of inertia in the hive-mind to overcome before changing course obviously, but it might be a sign.
Perhaps more parents are becoming aware of it?
Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
Maybe.

I understand both sides of the issue and the justification for it. When a kid has failed for the year by Christmas and knows it then what do you do with him/her until June? S/He knows they've failed and so there's no hook to do work. That leaves every class period 100% open to entertain himself with self-directed activities, most of which aren't positive for the class as a whole.

If the teacher is observed just letting the kid sit while the rest are working then there will be an intensive counseling session between that teacher and the Administration.
Was there ever a "hook" to get that kid to do the work? Why is a kid who is doing that poorly even the class? If the material is beyond their ability, why are they not in a remedial class that is more appropriate to their ability level? OR if the kid has that zero because they just didn't give a dent for the first half of the year, why would they now suddenly stop disrupting the class and study hard just to get the few points to pass? Why should the other kids who are trying be subjected to the disruption?

But let's go a step further. If zero work gets a 50 and 10% more gets a D, then how much work does it take to get a C? 20% of the work? How about an A? Can you get an A with just 40% of the work or does it still take more than 90%? Doesn't seem to be much equality of work/reward in that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-06-2023, 02:50 PM
 
12,522 posts, read 8,740,507 times
Reputation: 34281
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClaraC View Post
Here's the reason that policy came about to not give grades below a 50. Because a student could, and often did, really blow a major test. Really blow it, and get like a 20.

And then mathematically that can put the student in a place where there's no way they can pass the semester, even if they score very very well on the rest of the work.

And that does no one any good. To mathematically kick a kid out of passing a semester based on one major test, is a waste of everyone's time and money, especially for a kid who becomes motivated and masters the material.
Are you thinking college or high school?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-06-2023, 03:07 PM
 
Location: On the Chesapeake
44,741 posts, read 59,631,382 times
Reputation: 60264
Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
Perhaps more parents are becoming aware of it?


Was there ever a "hook" to get that kid to do the work? Why is a kid who is doing that poorly even the class? If the material is beyond their ability, why are they not in a remedial class that is more appropriate to their ability level? OR if the kid has that zero because they just didn't give a dent for the first half of the year, why would they now suddenly stop disrupting the class and study hard just to get the few points to pass? Why should the other kids who are trying be subjected to the disruption?

But let's go a step further. If zero work gets a 50 and 10% more gets a D, then how much work does it take to get a C? 20% of the work? How about an A? Can you get an A with just 40% of the work or does it still take more than 90%? Doesn't seem to be much equality of work/reward in that.
You already know the answers for most of your questions.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-06-2023, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Sunnybrook Farm
4,125 posts, read 2,332,814 times
Reputation: 12000
Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
Perhaps more parents are becoming aware of it?


Was there ever a "hook" to get that kid to do the work? ....
"If you flunk out, the next week the draft board will be contacting you, and six weeks after that you'll be in Vietnam..."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-06-2023, 03:42 PM
 
2,617 posts, read 2,192,508 times
Reputation: 4903
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cida View Post
I just find this so hard to believe. And so depressing.



Teachers Can’t Hold Students Accountable.
It’s Making the Job Miserable.

Several teachers whom I spoke with or who responded to my questionnaire mentioned policies stating that students cannot get lower than a 50 percent on any assignment, even if the work was never done, in some cases. A teacher from Chapel Hill, N.C., who filled in the questionnaire’s “name” field with “No, no, no,” said the 50 percent floor and “NO attendance enforcement” leads to a scenario where “we get students who skip over 100 days, have a 50 percent, complete a couple of assignments to tip over into 59.5 percent and then pass.”
Just passing students on without ensuring that they’ve learned what they need to learn is obviously not only demoralizing for teachers; it potentially has devastating consequences for our society. A Georgia middle-school teacher recently went viral on TikTok for discussing the stakes of this lack of accountability for kids. “I teach seventh grade. They are still performing on the fourth-grade level,” he says in the video. “I can probably count on one hand how many kids are actually performing on their grade level.” He feels that no one is talking about it and that parents lack awareness, and says no matter how many zeros he puts in the grade book, the children will be passed along to eighth grade.
https://www.nytimes.com/2023/10/04/o...s-parents.html

It's not at all hard to believe, and hasn't been for about 30 years.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-06-2023, 05:34 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
49,903 posts, read 23,645,912 times
Reputation: 32401
Quote:
Originally Posted by TaxPhd View Post
Do you agree with the policy of no score below 50%, even if 0% of the work is completed? How about no enforcement of attendance?
I don't believe in it, although I have worked under it.

And guess what I found...for the kids that really were in that "category"...they still got an F for the course or a D at best.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top