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Old 01-27-2024, 07:05 AM
 
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Oh, another set that is maybe more arcane:

palate: the roof of the mouth, or sense of taste
palette: an artist's paint board, or range of ciolors
pallet: a flat stand made of boards

It drives me nuts when people mix them up, writing about "flavors that will suit your palette" or "a popular pallet of colors."
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Old 01-27-2024, 07:28 AM
 
Location: a little corner of a very big universe
867 posts, read 721,639 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CalWorth View Post
principal/principal
capital/capitol

And when/why did people start substituting “on accident” for “by accident”?

I suspect that "on accident" is derived from its opposite, "on purpose."


There is a VERY long thread about errors in English in the Writing forum:


https://www.city-data.com/forum/writ...-part-3-a.html
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Old 01-27-2024, 09:04 AM
 
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4 pages too late, but "gone south" is not a mistake or typo. Just means "downhill." So I disagree that that one is used incorrectly.


But all the others - yup, sad state of affairs. It's mainly due to the poor English skills of the parents, though, right? And the failure of the parents to correct their children (as mine often did)? Now those kids grew up...and post here...



Parents now are the same age as the elementary teachers. Do you know any elementary teachers? The days when teachers were reliably intelligent and qualified are long gone (with apologies to all of you out there making it work). I know plenty of teachers (responsible for your children) who cannot speak "Good English."


I'm sorry - I'm a former teacher - and I am not bashing current teachers as a group - I'm just saying, there are many more out there than should be who are teaching today's kids - and their own English is awful. It's not a requirement to be perfect to become a teacher. The main requirement is a willingness to accept the horrible wage and unpleasant parent(s). Teaching "talent" is a distant 4th place.


(to the non-native speakers commenting here - if no one ever told you, I'll do it: Speaking perfect English will be nearly impossible for you, as very - very - few native speakers speak perfect English, and will not even know enough to correct your more subtle errors. This is not about your ability to learn - but about another's ability to teach you.)
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Old 01-27-2024, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Dunwoody,GA
2,240 posts, read 5,856,309 times
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Using "where" when you mean "were."

Using "weather" when you mean "whether."

Using apostrophes to make words plural. Example, "We are having dinner with the Miller's." NO.

Not knowing when to use "me" vs. "I." Example, "Bart and I's relationship." NO. Or "he served dinner to Bart and I." NO.

Failing to add an "ed" when needed. She "use to" is incorrect; it's "she used to." Or saying that someone is "bias." No, they are "biased."

Saying "she does it on a daily." NO, she "does it on a daily BASIS."

And the one that sends me around the bend is using "defiantly" instead of "definitely."
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Old 01-27-2024, 09:39 AM
 
Location: Southern MN
12,038 posts, read 8,406,229 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew in Minnesota View Post
Confusing sour and south doesn't happen. Mistaking -r for -th and vice versa isn't a thing. Or, if it is, it's a vanishingly rare one.
I'm thinking in the Spanish speaking countries this could happen as their word for south is dccccccccccccccccccccccccxz <--- Ha! That's a lap cat error.

The Spanish word for south is sur. Could that be what the OP sees?
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Old 01-27-2024, 09:46 AM
 
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I'm always amused when I see viscous used instead of vicious.
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Old 01-27-2024, 10:27 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lodestar View Post
I'm thinking in the Spanish speaking countries this could happen as their word for south is dccccccccccccccccccccccccxz <--- Ha! That's a lap cat error.

The Spanish word for south is sur. Could that be what the OP sees?
No, I think he was confused by the coexistence of the phrases "to go south" and "to go sour" and assumed that one was a mistake for the other.
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Old 01-27-2024, 01:29 PM
 
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Most of the mistakes mentioned could be the result of using voice dictation or an autocorrect - which sometimes has the mind of its own
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Old 01-27-2024, 01:54 PM
 
Location: In The South
7,004 posts, read 4,811,992 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CMMom View Post
Using "where" when you mean "were."

Using "weather" when you mean "whether."

Using apostrophes to make words plural. Example, "We are having dinner with the Miller's." NO.

Not knowing when to use "me" vs. "I." Example, "Bart and I's relationship." NO. Or "he served dinner to Bart and I." NO.

Failing to add an "ed" when needed. She "use to" is incorrect; it's "she used to." Or saying that someone is "bias." No, they are "biased."

Saying "she does it on a daily." NO, she "does it on a daily BASIS."

And the one that sends me around the bend is using "defiantly" instead of "definitely."
I always struggle with “whether.” I never know if it’s wether or whether.
My husband is not the best with spelling, and he always asks me “Is it where, or were?” when he’s writing something. I suspect auto correct confuses him.
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Old 01-27-2024, 02:49 PM
 
14,299 posts, read 11,681,163 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by L00k4ward View Post
Most of the mistakes mentioned could be the result of using voice dictation or an autocorrect - which sometimes has the mind of its own
Agree. For example, "defiantly" might be the result of someone's typing "definately"...which is incorrect, but instead of autocorrecting to "definitely" it turns into "defiantly" instead.
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