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Old 02-06-2024, 04:42 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
50,119 posts, read 23,785,288 times
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Considering what school systems have gone through with sex ed...now some of you want schools to teach "life"?

Are you nuts?
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Old 02-06-2024, 04:44 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
50,119 posts, read 23,785,288 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lillie767 View Post
You expect the public school system to teach money management to its students?

The public school system does not teach basic math proficiency to its students.


"The national average math proficiency is 38% (2024).
The state with highest math proficiency is Virgin Islands, with an 85% average math proficiency.
The state with lowest math proficiency is Maryland, with an 19% average math proficiency."

https://www.publicschoolreview.com/a.../national-data


There was a precipitous drop due to the pandemic, but pre-pandemic results were still terrible.

Before we assign the schools with additional tasks, maybe basic reading, writing, and arithmetic should be conquered.
So let's see. During the dreaded NCLB years those test scores improved significantly, and then when you all got your way to drop NCLB the test scores began dropping again. Great job, America!
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Old 02-06-2024, 04:58 PM
 
Location: On the Chesapeake
44,871 posts, read 59,846,876 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
So let's see. During the dreaded NCLB years those test scores improved significantly, and then when you all got your way to drop NCLB the test scores began dropping again. Great job, America!
Actually, that 38% proficient is probably what it's always been. We really don't know because scores weren't tracked very closely until NCLB.

If you were in College Prep then everybody was pretty much smart and proficient in most subjects. When kids were hard tracked the only time they came into contact, maybe, with lower performing students was in PE, Art and maybe Band. General Music classes kept the track, as did really the two I mentioned, because of scheduling. Band/Choir would be the outliers.
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Old 02-06-2024, 05:57 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
50,119 posts, read 23,785,288 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
Actually, that 38% proficient is probably what it's always been. We really don't know because scores weren't tracked very closely until NCLB.

If you were in College Prep then everybody was pretty much smart and proficient in most subjects. When kids were hard tracked the only time they came into contact, maybe, with lower performing students was in PE, Art and maybe Band. General Music classes kept the track, as did really the two I mentioned, because of scheduling. Band/Choir would be the outliers.
I'm just going by the graph presented.
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Old 02-06-2024, 05:59 PM
 
1,404 posts, read 1,061,156 times
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The school where I teach has shop and all kinds of trade certification courses. We offer multiple financial literacy courses as electives and all students are required to take Economics which includes financial literacy. There are FAR more mental health resources than I had in school. I don't know what other schools do, education is local.
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Old 02-06-2024, 06:50 PM
 
Location: On the Chesapeake
44,871 posts, read 59,846,876 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
I'm just going by the graph presented.
You know as well as I do that there's no way on God's green Earth that DC has 55% proficiency.
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Old 02-06-2024, 07:25 PM
 
Location: NMB, SC
41,645 posts, read 17,237,632 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
Considering what school systems have gone through with sex ed...now some of you want schools to teach "life"?

Are you nuts?
A cradle to grave society dependent on the government.
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Old 02-06-2024, 07:40 PM
 
1,684 posts, read 761,565 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TMSRetired View Post
A cradle to grave society dependent on the government.
I hear what you're saying and do concur, however...I sure wish there was a "Life Skills" course when I was in high school, covering things like banking and managing finances, job hunting/resume writing, doing taxes, and (now) how to avoid scams/fraud in everyday life. Seeing as the government imposes on and controls much of our lives, why shouldn't there be basic training for adulthood provided in public schools? If it was elective I probably would have signed up for it. Yes, effective parents will teach and guide their children into adulthood, offering advice and support. Some of us had ineffective parents who showed us the door on our 18th birthdays, to be thrown in with the wolves.

A few years back a university made the news for offering an "Adulting" class and was widely mocked. I'd rather that there was a class offered rather than spawning a bunch of clueless adults...and there are plenty.
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Old 02-06-2024, 07:46 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
50,119 posts, read 23,785,288 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by heavymind View Post
I hear what you're saying and do concur, however...I sure wish there was a "Life Skills" course when I was in high school, covering things like banking and managing finances, job hunting/resume writing, doing taxes, and (now) how to avoid scams/fraud in everyday life. Seeing as the government imposes on and controls much of our lives, why shouldn't there be basic training for adulthood provided in public schools? If it was elective I probably would have signed up for it. Yes, effective parents will teach and guide their children into adulthood, offering advice and support. Some of us had ineffective parents who showed us the door on our 18th birthdays, to be thrown in with the wolves.

A few years back a university made the news for offering an "Adulting" class and was widely mocked. I'd rather that there was a class offered rather than spawning a bunch of clueless adults...and there are plenty.
The OP asked about teaching "life". I'm not even sure what that means.

Limited skills like you're talking about...sure.
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Old 02-06-2024, 08:05 PM
 
Location: New England
3,171 posts, read 1,652,879 times
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Teaching "Life" is supposed to be the parent's responsibility. Except most parents these days can't seem to figure things out for themselves. I'm sure there are exceptions but what I see on the news are mostly failures.
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