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Old 02-08-2007, 05:31 AM
 
Location: E ND & NW MN
4,730 posts, read 9,081,168 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sprtsluvr8 View Post
So does any and everyone have the option to apply for a school outside their zone? Or is it only special cases and possibly students assigned to schools considered failing schools? I know that is the case here in Atlanta, but most people in a failing school are stuck with it because it is expensive and time consuming to do it any other way.
From what I understand...students can attend anywhere. They must apply but there are no special cases (meaning good/bad etc students can do so). I looked at Wisconsin....Minnesota and North Dakota info on the web and this how I understand it. Someone with specific experience or more info may elighten this.

From the state dept of education web site:all Minnesota’s public school students have the opportunity to apply to attend school outside of the school district where they live. More than 30,000 Minnesota students did just that last year. Students must apply to the school district of their choice by January 15 in order to have the best chance of being admitted the following fall. Families generally provide their own school transportation. No tuition is charged.

Of course each student application can be rejected. I think each school district or state has some special rules for this.

Dan
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Old 02-08-2007, 07:38 AM
j33
 
4,625 posts, read 12,632,479 times
Reputation: 1650
Where I grew up (south suburbs of Chicago), I was under the impression that one had to go to the school that was in his or her district unless the parent could make a compelling reason (bullying, etc) why the student could not do so, and then if that were the case, it was up to the parent to provide transportation to that school. My sister ended up going to a different school for that very reason, but there was a bus route that let her off within a mile of our home, so she just had to suck it up and walk to that bus route (where I lived there were a lot of schools close together and part of my town went to one school and part of the town went to another).

That being said, there was a lot of lying about addresses and kids saying that they lived with aunts and uncles, etc so that they could go to different schools. I knew several kids that took the train down from Chicago every day, said that they lived with a friend or a relative, so that they wouldn't have to attend city schools. It was a complicated ordeal indeed.
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Old 02-08-2007, 08:37 AM
 
3,042 posts, read 7,938,955 times
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i agree with the first poster--unfortunately, the place i live now(temporarily) has awful schools, but my hometown in SC has excellent public schools, so I will be moving there when daughter becomes school age.

I wont utilize the public schools because of other factors besides academics, so will be most likely private schooling or homeschooling
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Old 02-08-2007, 09:27 AM
 
146 posts, read 530,014 times
Reputation: 180
Default The Case for School Vouchers

In Texas, students must attend the school in which they are zoned. There is very little choice and very few options to get into another school short of relocating to a different zone. Most states are like Texas and force kids to go to a particular school based solely on place of residence.

There are a couple options to get your child enrolled into another school:
1) application to a magnate school
magnate schools can be quite choosy and often admit kids based on academic and G/T standing. Many of these
schools have waiting lists and they're often tough to get into if not impossible for the average kid.

2) request for variance
teachers working in a district can have their kids placed wherever they want (w/the exception of merit based
programs like magnate school) but the rest of the public begs and very few variances are approved.

If the school your child is zoned to is deemed "low-performing" then technically, another school is supposed to be available for enrollment. What happens though, is that these other schools usually claim "Full enrollment" so they don't have to take anyone from outside their zone.

Public schools can be pits and if the public really knew what was going on inside of them, they'd be shocked.

My experience is that the best schools are in the best areas. Until this horrid system can be fixed (and I do not think it will be) find a good zone and pray you can afford to live in it. Choose the school first before the location. Or go private.
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Old 02-08-2007, 10:34 AM
 
504 posts, read 1,618,988 times
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Here in Hillsborough county you have some choices as to where you send your kids to school, most people choose to send their children to the school closest because transportation is a problem.
What I have found its not where your children go to school its how much parents are involved in their education.
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Old 02-08-2007, 10:42 AM
 
Location: Bay Area, CA
28,166 posts, read 43,444,026 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Need_affordable_home View Post
You could complain about bullies or that the school has a low rating and back it up with facts.
Somehow I don't think that would work... our schools are grossly overcrowded, and I doubt "little" problems such as those would concern them. Sad, but true.

Quote:
Relocation may not always work and can be expensive, naturally the districts with the best schools have more expensive houses. Private schools are an option at a price.
My parents sent us to private schools for the reasons above, but it comes at a HEFTY price, which many cannot pay... a good private school can run upwards of $25K/year in California, and scholarships are tough to get. With three kids (like my family), you're looking at $300K for high school alone.
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Old 02-08-2007, 12:52 PM
j33
 
4,625 posts, read 12,632,479 times
Reputation: 1650
Quote:
Originally Posted by gizmo980 View Post
Somehow I don't think that would work... our schools are grossly overcrowded, and I doubt "little" problems such as those would concern them. Sad, but true.

.
Sad but true. I went to a school in which they took away the cafeteria to make it into classrooms and employed fully armed security guards, so bullying wasn't too high on their list. Out and out violence that involved weapons was more of their concern (I saw a kid stabbed in school). The state of schools is a sad one, and not everyone can afford to send their kid off to a private school.
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Old 02-08-2007, 12:59 PM
 
4,267 posts, read 7,883,469 times
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It depends on the district.

In Houston ISD, difficulty of getting into a magnet school depends on the target school. Apply to many schools, and most kids should get into all of them. For kids who have tough times getting into good magnet schools, charter schools exist to fill the "good school" void.

Then, we have Garland ISD. Garland ISD does not have assigned attendance boundaries. GISD allows for parents to select schools. Several areas have a list of schools that "provide" bus transportation; parents must transport children to other schools.

And, I concur with English teacher - know your zoned school BEFORE you move. However, I suggest this advice to anyone wishing to move anywhere in the USA.

Quote:
Originally Posted by english_teacher View Post
In Texas, students must attend the school in which they are zoned. There is very little choice and very few options to get into another school short of relocating to a different zone. Most states are like Texas and force kids to go to a particular school based solely on place of residence.

There are a couple options to get your child enrolled into another school:
1) application to a magnate school
magnate schools can be quite choosy and often admit kids based on academic and G/T standing. Many of these
schools have waiting lists and they're often tough to get into if not impossible for the average kid.

2) request for variance
teachers working in a district can have their kids placed wherever they want (w/the exception of merit based
programs like magnate school) but the rest of the public begs and very few variances are approved.

If the school your child is zoned to is deemed "low-performing" then technically, another school is supposed to be available for enrollment. What happens though, is that these other schools usually claim "Full enrollment" so they don't have to take anyone from outside their zone.

Public schools can be pits and if the public really knew what was going on inside of them, they'd be shocked.

My experience is that the best schools are in the best areas. Until this horrid system can be fixed (and I do not think it will be) find a good zone and pray you can afford to live in it. Choose the school first before the location. Or go private.
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Old 02-08-2007, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
4,486 posts, read 14,918,052 times
Reputation: 3919
I call it a double standard. The wealthy folks can send their kids basically anywhere they want. They can chose to move to an affluent suburb where the school's are ranked highly or they can chose to send them to a private school.

But the middle and lower class can't afford to relocate OR to send their kids to a private school. The schools cannot discriminate but their price tags can.

A couple I know sends their 4 kids to a private school down here, they pay close to $100,000 for ONE YEAR!!

And frankly I can't blame them...
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Old 02-08-2007, 04:14 PM
 
4,267 posts, read 7,883,469 times
Reputation: 1546
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpeedyAZ View Post
I call it a double standard. The wealthy folks can send their kids basically anywhere they want. They can chose to move to an affluent suburb where the school's are ranked highly or they can chose to send them to a private school.

But the middle and lower class can't afford to relocate OR to send their kids to a private school. The schools cannot discriminate but their price tags can.

A couple I know sends their 4 kids to a private school down here, they pay close to $100,000 for ONE YEAR!!

And frankly I can't blame them...
Actually, middle class can relocate too. There are many suburbs with cheap homes. The people who are shut out often are the poor.
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