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Old 02-08-2007, 01:00 AM
 
Location: WPB, FL. Dreaming of Oil city, PA
2,909 posts, read 12,791,759 times
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I see people complaining about bad schools in their location. Well dont go to that school then, attend a different public school! In some cases one school may be closer to your house than another! I dont see why you cant get a choice of schools you want
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Old 02-08-2007, 02:00 AM
 
Location: E ND & NW MN
4,731 posts, read 9,083,146 times
Reputation: 3454
Many states do have open enrollment policies...and each one can be different. I only know about North Dakota and Minnesota. Any student can apply to go to school in another district that he/she does not reside in. The problem is...transportation to/from school is often the responsibility of the parent (which can be a problem when both work) and also I think a lot comes into play when sending your child to a school where his/her friends dont go.

The policy up here does not allow open enrollment within the same school district i.e. you must go to the one assigned for your neighborhood.

Dan
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Old 02-08-2007, 02:47 AM
 
Location: Bay Area, CA
28,185 posts, read 43,452,271 times
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In California, you attend the school that's in your district... they don't give you an option! Some exceptions are made, but you have to have a darned good reason & go through a bunch of red-tape. So all people really can do is complain, unless they have the means to relocate to a better district.
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Old 02-08-2007, 02:52 AM
 
Location: WPB, FL. Dreaming of Oil city, PA
2,909 posts, read 12,791,759 times
Reputation: 991
Quote:
Originally Posted by gizmo980 View Post
In California, you attend the school that's in your district... they don't give you an option! Some exceptions are made, but you have to have a darned good reason & go through a bunch of red-tape. So all people really can do is complain, unless they have the means to relocate to a better district.

You could complain about bullies or that the school has a low rating and back it up with facts. Relocation may not always work and can be expensive, naturally the districts with the best schools have more expensive houses. Private schools are an option at a price.
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Old 02-08-2007, 04:30 AM
 
Location: PA
669 posts, read 2,903,879 times
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Well in general, if the schools in your district are bad, I would think choicing to a nearby one won't help. Yes there are exceptions but if the schools in a city are bad usually they're ALL below-average. Thus, asking about schools is still needed.
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Old 02-08-2007, 04:32 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
699 posts, read 2,302,348 times
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If parents could choose any school for their child, the schools would never know how many students to expect in August. The schools base everything on enrollment, like the number of...teachers needed, classrooms, lunch periods, custodians, etc...plus supplies, space, supplemental programs, budget...you get the picture. They have to predict enrollment based on end of year previous, withdrawals, pre-registration...then plus all of the surprise first day registrations. Then on top of that having parents from nearby zones or even other school systems? That would also create a huge classroom space crisis in many schools. Others would possible have to close or have very few students. That certainly doesn't help an already poor performing school or the students that are left there with no option.

The well known schools in City of Atlanta that are high performing have a strict proof-of-address policy. Every school year parents have to file several copies proving that they live in the district in question...even if your child went there the year before you have to prove it again...and again...Morningside Elementary is that way. There is such a wide gap between the "good" schools and "bad" schools in Atlanta that they don't have a choice but to tighten up on the zoning this way.

I with there were some different answers for pulic education. It's basically been the same for 100 plus years in the U.S. New ideas and new programs come through constantly, but the core framework of education has not changed...and it reallyl needs to because so much has changed in our society. Needs of the students are different, and needs of the parents and communities are different too. Teachers work really hard to do the things asked of us but too much is piled on us and it can't all be done.

Public education reform....we really need it but what kinds of changes do we make? Do we leave anything the same or completely overhaul the entire set up? I think it should start from go, from a clean slate, and change the delivery and the expected outcomes...all those kids in disadvantaged areas are worth saving and educating. They need it more than anyone.
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Old 02-08-2007, 04:36 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
699 posts, read 2,302,348 times
Reputation: 288
Quote:
Originally Posted by bmurphy View Post
Well in general, if the schools in your district are bad, I would think choicing to a nearby one won't help. Yes there are exceptions but if the schools in a city are bad usually they're ALL below-average. Thus, asking about schools is still needed.
Each school is graded on the students' performance. You actually think that every school in an entire system is bad just because some or even most are failing? There are schools from one end of the spectrum to the other, really in every district. Even if they all have good scores the schools are still ranked in order, and somebody has to be on the low end of the scale...and soomebody has to be last. We would call those the "bad" schools...
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Old 02-08-2007, 04:55 AM
 
1,286 posts, read 2,166,478 times
Reputation: 670
Need affordable home, are you racist or something? Don't you know it's much better for your kids to be bussed an extra 15 miles so their seats in the closer school can be warmed by inner city youth?
Sarcasm off.

Sorry, but that was the first thought to hit me. Government doesn't care about your kids, their bus ride, or their school. Government cares about quotas to keep their protected minorities happy and in line.

Funny how movies like "Remember the Titans" only focus on race integration of schools rather than the fact that most of these kids were bussed from the far end of the county, past their original school, simply for the same opportunity as the white devils.

Last edited by Electron; 02-08-2007 at 05:08 AM..
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Old 02-08-2007, 05:00 AM
 
Location: E ND & NW MN
4,731 posts, read 9,083,146 times
Reputation: 3454
On the Minnesota and North Dakota state education web sites I saw that they require an application be filed roughly by Jan 15 before the school year. The application is then sent to be approved or denied. I dont know how it works in the more populated Twin Cities down south of here...but up here all school districts have been facing steady or slow declining enrollment (mainly due to people having less kids as actually our population has stablized and increased since the flood of 97 back to pre-flood levels).

Most people in our immediate area keep their kids with the school district they live in...although some students who live in rural smaller districts choose to come into a larger district due to more course options. The difference in schools in our area is very negligible. Thankfully we dont have any issues with gangs, fights, etc (knock on wood). Our cold keeps some people away.

Dan
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Old 02-08-2007, 05:11 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
699 posts, read 2,302,348 times
Reputation: 288
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaninEGF View Post
On the Minnesota and North Dakota state education web sites I saw that they require an application be filed roughly by Jan 15 before the school year. The application is then sent to be approved or denied. I dont know how it works in the more populated Twin Cities down south of here...but up here all school districts have been facing steady or slow declining enrollment (mainly due to people having less kids as actually our population has stablized and increased since the flood of 97 back to pre-flood levels).
So does any and everyone have the option to apply for a school outside their zone? Or is it only special cases and possibly students assigned to schools considered failing schools? I know that is the case here in Atlanta, but most people in a failing school are stuck with it because it is expensive and time consuming to do it any other way.
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