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Old 09-21-2008, 03:50 AM
 
268 posts, read 959,256 times
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I'm hoping there are high school teachers (adolescence education majors) in this forum.

I wanted to know, in your opinion, which course had the stronger impact in making you the teacher you are now, the content courses (courses that were specific to your teaching area) or the general education courses (courses that taught education theory)?

[. . . and maybe we should discount applied methods courses (observations and student-teaching) since those are to be considered amalgams of the two areas I'm trying to pinpoint . . . ]

Thanks in advance.
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Old 09-21-2008, 04:42 AM
 
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I would say neither. Obviously you need your content courses to master your subject area. The education courses were helpful understanding some of the whys for kids but honestly I would have to say being a parent was the best way to become a good teacher and has had the most impact on how I taught.
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Old 09-21-2008, 06:36 AM
 
Location: Midwest transplant
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The content courses were helpful in designing units of study. The education courses except for methods and student teaching were a waste of credits in terms of how they helped in the classroom.

The best lessons learned on how to teach and motivate students to learn has been the on the job experience of trail and error. In other words, years of experience!
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Old 09-21-2008, 10:06 AM
 
268 posts, read 959,256 times
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Thanks, golfgal and teachbeach.

So then, my question becomes: if the college courses (except for content courses and a few methods courses) are not doing what they're supposed to be doing (making good teachers) - how do we ensure that we have good teachers?
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Old 09-21-2008, 10:12 AM
 
1,428 posts, read 2,828,259 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coldwynn View Post
I'm hoping there are high school teachers (adolescence education majors) in this forum.

I wanted to know, in your opinion, which course had the stronger impact in making you the teacher you are now, the content courses (courses that were specific to your teaching area) or the general education courses (courses that taught education theory)?

[. . . and maybe we should discount applied methods courses (observations and student-teaching) since those are to be considered amalgams of the two areas I'm trying to pinpoint . . . ]

Thanks in advance.
Okay, my observations may not be true for all, but my experiences are these:

Almost each and every single class I ever took in the College of Education was a complete and utter waste of time, an insult to anyone with an education, useless for practical or theoretical application for teaching, and in short, an utter joke.

Let me say this again: Almost ALL of them were cr**.

Here is where I actually did learn useful information:

1. My cooperating teacher, who taught me more about classroom management and dealing with school administration and students and lesson planning than anyone EVER. Kudos to her; I owe her more than I can say.

2. A short three-hour seminar on classroom management taught by a junior high school teacher who knew exactly what he was talking about.

That's it.

Seriously, the true aid to my teaching came from my background in English. I have a B.A. and an M.A. in English, and the depth and breadth of that knowledge, from grammar through literature, has been the genuine material on which I've drawn.

I am of the opinion that most colleges of education should be scrapped, and instead of the current system we have now, would-be teachers would be required to major in a content-rich area such as mathematics, English, science, or history. Then, they should be paired over the course of the next three quarters with master teachers in at least three different schools of differing SES levels. The other quarter can be devoted to short workshops or seminars covering subjects such as lesson planning, getting along with parents and administration, classroom management, using actual data to shape your teaching methods, and other topics useful to would-be teachers.

However, I don't notice anyone making me the secretary of education, so I'm guessing this won't happen soon.
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Old 09-21-2008, 05:48 PM
 
20,793 posts, read 53,871,747 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coldwynn View Post
Thanks, golfgal and teachbeach.

So then, my question becomes: if the college courses (except for content courses and a few methods courses) are not doing what they're supposed to be doing (making good teachers) - how do we ensure that we have good teachers?
That is not the question you asked. You didn't ask if the content/education courses made you a good teacher you asked which had the most impact. The education courses I took were helpful and gave you a good foundation to start teaching, at least where I went to school. Name one job where a student can come out of college and be totally proficient, there are none. EVERY job requires some degree of on the job training and in every job your on the job training is how you become better.
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