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Old 10-09-2008, 02:14 PM
 
6,745 posts, read 7,670,557 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LOnRainjer View Post
video games made kids fat and stupid
I couldn't agree more!
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Old 10-09-2008, 02:30 PM
 
148 posts, read 539,591 times
Reputation: 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by LOnRainjer View Post
video games made kids fat and stupid
Come on now! The video game industry is suggesting that kids who play video games make good surgeons becuase of the "eye hand" co-ordination. So I guess we will have a lot of fat surgeons!
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Old 10-09-2008, 02:36 PM
 
9,856 posts, read 12,239,330 times
Reputation: 5433
Quote:
Originally Posted by SaratL View Post
Come on now! The video game industry is suggesting that kids who play video games make good surgeons becuase of the "eye hand" co-ordination. So I guess we will have a lot of fat surgeons!
I have a feeling all of the surgeons we have were studying instead of playing video games... last I heard you have to work pretty hard to get into med school
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Old 10-09-2008, 02:38 PM
 
Location: Lettuce Land
681 posts, read 2,413,053 times
Reputation: 246
Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Gringo View Post
What defense do you see me offering, and for whom?
I read your post as a general defense of the country's education system, and I considered it to be "over-reaching". In my experience there is too much empirical evidence that points to there being some [but not total] truth to the societal conclusions with which you seem to disagree. Btw, most college/university profs aren't stupid, so much, but too many seem biased and closed-minded - which forms an "educational" dichotomy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Gringo View Post
Where I live, there's a station that has all right-wing radio kooks all the time, and another that right-wing radio kooks during the day, and sports talk at night. That probably isn't all that different in many other parts of the country.
I bow to your better knowledge of your communty's radio coverage and its limitations. Where I live there are about 30 AM and 80 FM stations available, so I apologize for assuming differently for you.
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Old 10-09-2008, 02:47 PM
 
28,906 posts, read 42,448,527 times
Reputation: 45543
Quote:
Originally Posted by hnsq View Post
I just started reading "Amusing Ourselves to Death" by Neil Postman, I would recommend it to anyone (especially if you are in this thread). His premise is that we have moved into the age of showbusiness. The move away from a print based culture has really harmed our society. When someone like Lincoln gave a speech, it was a spoken copy of a written speech. It was spoken in the same way we would write an essay for graduate school. Now, politicians communicate in quips and slogans. We have moved away from literacy and into an age where entertainment trumps all.

I think the concept of trivia is amazing. Trivia is a fairly new concept. In modern society, a smart person can spout off random facts about almost anything, but they have no depth of knowledge. Intellectualism is embracing one subject fully and not being afraid of the details. Games like trivial pursuit seem to show us who is smart, but smart today is just useless knowledge.

I just graduated college - am only 22, and I would be the first to admit that I have been way too lazy. I thought about going to grad school for psychology a couple of years ago, but didn't do it because I didn't want to go to that much school. Recently I have been thinking about this anti-intellectualism, and am seriously reconsidering going back to school. I don't want to end up being called smart because I can win 'Are you smarter than a 5th grader'.
Funny, I cited that book on another thread somewhere the other day. I'm glad you're reading it. When I read it in the 80s, I thought it was shrill. Now I realize that it was eerily prescient.
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Old 10-09-2008, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Orlando, Florida
43,858 posts, read 41,676,454 times
Reputation: 58508
When you use a "No Child Left Behind" mentality, you end up with graduating seniors who should still be in 6th grade.

I'm not attacking this specific program which is designed to help children, I am only saying kids are constantly being moved up in school who do not have the education required to pass into the next grade. Perhaps a strong summer school program to help these kids in the areas they are weak in would be a solution. However, patting them on the head and telling them how smart they are....is NOT working.
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Old 10-09-2008, 03:22 PM
 
28,906 posts, read 42,448,527 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GloryB View Post
When you use a "No Child Left Behind" mentality, you end up with graduating seniors who should still be in 6th grade.

I'm not attacking this specific program which is designed to help children, I am only saying kids are constantly being moved up in school who do not have the education required to pass into the next grade. Perhaps a strong summer school program to help these kids in the areas they are weak in would be a solution. However, patting them on the head and telling them how smart they are....is NOT working.
See, I take the opposite tack. I think NCLB, with all its flaws, was designed to combat the very thing you're railing at.

The standards at schools had become so elastic and subjective, it was next to impossible to determine whether or not a high school graduate was functionally literate. At least with NCLB, there is some accountability. Sure, there are lots of problems with it, but it was probably the very first step to actually restore faith in our schools again. Because whenever I hear an educator really gripe about NCLB, I secretly think that, most likely, that's an educator who wanted to just get by until retirement.
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Old 10-09-2008, 03:52 PM
 
Location: Carlsbad
105 posts, read 615,885 times
Reputation: 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Gringo View Post
I see...

You must work in advertising.
Hahaha. Ironically, I work with rocket scientists.
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Old 10-09-2008, 06:47 PM
 
Location: Midwest
2,603 posts, read 6,060,318 times
Reputation: 2751
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
See, I take the opposite tack. I think NCLB, with all its flaws, was designed to combat the very thing you're railing at.

The standards at schools had become so elastic and subjective, it was next to impossible to determine whether or not a high school graduate was functionally literate. At least with NCLB, there is some accountability. Sure, there are lots of problems with it, but it was probably the very first step to actually restore faith in our schools again. Because whenever I hear an educator really gripe about NCLB, I secretly think that, most likely, that's an educator who wanted to just get by until retirement.
NCLB is simply a fed takeover of the schools. They lack the constitutional authority and just as important the competence to do that.
Local control, period.
The people are best qualified to make education decisions, not bureaucrats far from the eyes of the citizens.

"Whenever the people are well-informed, they can be trusted with their own government. Whenever things get so far wrong as to attract their notice, they may be relied on to set them to rights." --Thomas Jefferson to Richard Price, 1789. ME 7:253

"Above all things I hope the education of the common people will be attended to; convinced that on their good sense we may rely with the most security for the preservation of a due degree of liberty." --Thomas Jefferson to James Madison, 1787. Madison Version FE 4:480

"Enlighten the people generally, and tyranny and oppressions of body and mind will vanish like evil spirits at the dawn of day." --Thomas Jefferson to Pierre Samuel Dupont de Nemours, 1816. ME 14:491
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Old 10-10-2008, 11:07 AM
 
Location: Texas
40,999 posts, read 45,244,605 times
Reputation: 63104
There's something different (and possibly wrong) that we're doing with kids these days. 100 years ago, it was a given that a 7 year old child could and would get up at 5am and help with milking, feeding cattle, and other various farming duties. By the time you're ten, you're in charge of your younger siblings. These days, you can barely get the same-aged kid to sit in a car and go to the grocery store without food, games, and a dvd player on hand.

Kids just seem less capable and much less self-sufficient these days. They have little to no responsibility and they appear to be insanely coddled. That has to translate to how they grow into adulthood.

Creating school programs to try to mitigate the effects of how kids are raised at home may or may not have any effect in the long run. They don't seem to be, anyway.
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