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Old 10-08-2008, 08:49 AM
 
82 posts, read 259,685 times
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To parents:
What do you expect from your children's teachers in terms of classroom discipline? Do you expect them to approach behavior-related problems with ONLY positive reinforcement and redirection? Or do you prefer that teachers become the secondary parental authority in your absence and be able to use both positive reinforcement and punishment (e.g. going to the principal's office, completing extra assignments/hw, missing out on a trip, etc.)?

To teachers:
What kind of behavioral reinforcements do you apply to the classroom? What kind of student behaviors would call for punishment? How have parents reacted to your methods?

Let us hear your opinions....
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Old 10-09-2008, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Tupelo,MS
53 posts, read 299,108 times
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I believe positive reinforcement is wonderful and I use it in my classroom! My kids don't have much down time in my classroom so acting out does not happen often. If it does happen we address it with a warning (restating the correct way to act and giving a consequence if it happens again), then if it happens again the child gets the consequence. Normally it only takes one child making the mistake to test the teacher and recieving the consequence and the others see I mean business. I don't believe in yelling and constantly correcting either. You gotta mean what you say and reward the children making good choices!(reward does not always mean an actualy prize it could mean praise or being a special helper) If a child is consistant with acting out there is usually an under lying problem there (home situation, disability that has not been addressed, attention starved) and we address that one on one with the parent. It works for me! I would love to hear from others what works well for them! Teachers always need better ideas!
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Old 10-09-2008, 11:13 AM
 
82 posts, read 259,685 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brittanyk25 View Post
I believe positive reinforcement is wonderful and I use it in my classroom! My kids don't have much down time in my classroom so acting out does not happen often. If it does happen we address it with a warning (restating the correct way to act and giving a consequence if it happens again), then if it happens again the child gets the consequence. Normally it only takes one child making the mistake to test the teacher and recieving the consequence and the others see I mean business. I don't believe in yelling and constantly correcting either. You gotta mean what you say and reward the children making good choices!(reward does not always mean an actualy prize it could mean praise or being a special helper) If a child is consistant with acting out there is usually an under lying problem there (home situation, disability that has not been addressed, attention starved) and we address that one on one with the parent. It works for me! I would love to hear from others what works well for them! Teachers always need better ideas!

Thanks for replying. How long have you been teaching? Have you ever had a student that won't follow consquences or change after parent-teacher meetings have been carried about about his/her actions? What do you do? thanks.
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Old 10-09-2008, 02:26 PM
 
Location: Orlando, Florida
43,858 posts, read 44,589,257 times
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When I was in school, a few decades ago, parents trusted the decision made by teachers or other school authorities. Also, teachers could expect parents to react responsibly if they contacted a parent about behavior problems. Therefore, the school and the parents worked together and stood as a team.

Now, this has all changed. I think kids play parent against school officials in the same way they play parent against parent in a divorce situation. All this has done is made it extra hard on any adult involved and given kids a power they aren't responsible enough to use.

I have no idea how the young teachers and parents of today are going to iron out the guidelines. I feel sorry for both sides.
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Old 10-10-2008, 07:49 AM
 
82 posts, read 259,685 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GloryB View Post
When I was in school, a few decades ago, parents trusted the decision made by teachers or other school authorities. Also, teachers could expect parents to react responsibly if they contacted a parent about behavior problems. Therefore, the school and the parents worked together and stood as a team.

Now, this has all changed. I think kids play parent against school officials in the same way they play parent against parent in a divorce situation. All this has done is made it extra hard on any adult involved and given kids a power they aren't responsible enough to use.

I have no idea how the young teachers and parents of today are going to iron out the guidelines. I feel sorry for both sides.

It is true. Most children don't have enough sense of responsibility to handle the power they now have. I know of several teachers whose reputations have been destroyed because a child lied about being spanked or verbally abused. Before even investigating the issue, the parents called children's services and found out the next day from the teacher and classroom witnesses that their child made up a story. I believe that we need to protect our children from abuse but also school them on what it is--the child I was mentioning didn't even know what spanking was. She thought a gentle pat was spanking. :shrugs: I was there. I saw it. And the child even laughed after the sub teacher gave her a friendly pat on the back. She thought it was a joke.
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Old 10-12-2008, 01:23 PM
 
3,566 posts, read 4,619,203 times
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I expect them to contact me if there is a disciplinary action taken in the classroom or by the principle or by the bus driver. I cannot back a decision if I do not know about it. My son receives a grade on his report card for conduct. This is not about second parenting. My son is being socialized into the education system and graded on it.

Currently, my son has a consequence board that he must sign off on for stepping out of line, forgetting his homework, or leaving a book at home. There is also a conduct treat at the end of the week that needs to be earned. The teacher is phenominal. She is well organized and communicative not only of his progress academically but conduct wise.

This is far better then last year. There was not any communication. Every once in a while I would get a nasty little note sent home with no information. I sat down with the teacher at the parent/teacher meeting and stated that if there was a problem that I needed to know. I think a disciplinary action had been taken as to my child not being able to go out to recess. In my mind, I was thinking that I cannot reprimand my child or explain what he did wrong if I do not know. She became extremely defensive saying that she had the right to discipline children. I stated to her that I agreed. After 10 minutes of her stating that and my agreeing with her, I left. I thought that was a clear indicator that my son's educational career was going to suck forever.

The district, or rather the state that I live in, will actually suspend a child and not notify the parents by phone. It comes in the mail. There are parents that have begged the schools to notify them if there is a problem. Its like the school dishes out discipline and then runs and hides. The opposite of Zero Tolerance is NOT a second parent.
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Old 10-12-2008, 02:16 PM
 
124 posts, read 437,271 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CdnNewbie1 View Post

To teachers:
What kind of behavioral reinforcements do you apply to the classroom? What kind of student behaviors would call for punishment? How have parents reacted to your methods?

Let us hear your opinions....
While student teaching and substitute teaching (didn't get a job first year out get a job.)

I use a variety of techniques. First, positive reinforcement. Reward those who behave properly. Since I am a HS teacher, I do ot tell them the correct way they should behave but rather simply remind them of the rule. I also keep a classroom routine which is important for all levels of school, and keep the students busy and use smooth transitions.

I also use a 1 minute rule which if the student breaks a simple rule like chewing gum (as the most common), I would keep them one minute after class. This technique was okay but probably will not use it agin.

When contacting parents, I used a mass e-mail to keep them informed on upcoming assignments and projects, along with a monthly newsletter. When contacting them with behavior problems, I explained to them what the students were doing wrong, and that it was unacceptable, and gave them the opportunity for a meeting.
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Old 10-12-2008, 04:32 PM
 
901 posts, read 2,678,101 times
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What a loaded question. I'm a teacher and let me tell you know that classroom management is not a one size fits all approach. For some children, positive reinforcement works for them. Sometimes I have to take away privledges. If the parent is supportive, it helps a whole lot. Some parents are supportive, whereas some think that their child is an angel and can do no wrong. It is so strange (and frustrating) that parents can be in denile about their children. I never do anything that is inappropriate, so the parents cannot complain too much.

The most difficult thing about classroom management is that something that worked in November may not work in March. You constantly have to change your approach.
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Old 10-15-2008, 07:40 AM
 
82 posts, read 259,685 times
Reputation: 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam82 View Post
What a loaded question. I'm a teacher and let me tell you know that classroom management is not a one size fits all approach. For some children, positive reinforcement works for them. Sometimes I have to take away privledges. If the parent is supportive, it helps a whole lot. Some parents are supportive, whereas some think that their child is an angel and can do no wrong. It is so strange (and frustrating) that parents can be in denile about their children. I never do anything that is inappropriate, so the parents cannot complain too much.

The most difficult thing about classroom management is that something that worked in November may not work in March. You constantly have to change your approach.

How realistic is it to expect teachers to call the parents every single time a consequence is laid out for misbehavior? You sure have a difficult task; in addition to teaching a subject, you're teaching people about life, while at the same time growing, yourself, to meet everyone's needs. What makes you want to keep teaching?
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Old 10-15-2008, 07:44 AM
 
82 posts, read 259,685 times
Reputation: 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by histo320 View Post
While student teaching and substitute teaching (didn't get a job first year out get a job.)

I use a variety of techniques. First, positive reinforcement. Reward those who behave properly. Since I am a HS teacher, I do ot tell them the correct way they should behave but rather simply remind them of the rule. I also keep a classroom routine which is important for all levels of school, and keep the students busy and use smooth transitions.

I also use a 1 minute rule which if the student breaks a simple rule like chewing gum (as the most common), I would keep them one minute after class. This technique was okay but probably will not use it agin.

When contacting parents, I used a mass e-mail to keep them informed on upcoming assignments and projects, along with a monthly newsletter. When contacting them with behavior problems, I explained to them what the students were doing wrong, and that it was unacceptable, and gave them the opportunity for a meeting.

That's one great idea to further communicate with parents. I'm sure teachers don't get many opportunities to chat with parents on a regular basis and email is so convenient.
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