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Old 03-28-2007, 06:49 PM
 
Location: Hell
606 posts, read 698,741 times
Reputation: 85

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Quote:
Originally Posted by osjo73 View Post
But it's not the actual homework people. Wow, it's amazing when I look around my work place and see so many people that are not from the US in charge....and I take a look at our own kids in the streets, malls, with Xbox, ipods, and cell phones. Time will tell...
kids in other countries are actually doing the same things.Cell phones and ipods are popular among teenagers even in some developing countries.
trust me,american kids have at least,one of the best education in the world.
only a few foreigners are able to work in US and in charge(I mean legally for sure).after all,you should allow other countries to have some talented people.you can't expect all the elites to be from the US.
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Old 03-28-2007, 07:01 PM
 
Location: Hell
606 posts, read 698,741 times
Reputation: 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by I LOVE PA! View Post
I personally think merit awards can get nasty...in sports, if you are a high scorer, it is obvious, but some students are so quiet, they go unnoticed. That was my daughter. She was so always helping other kids too, one year she had a friend who had a horrible home life, parents in the middle of a ugly divorce, both alcoholics, frequent visits from security in our development for domestic violence. This poor boy was failing, and I would have him come over, feed him and they would do their homework and she would study with him. She was the reason he ended up passing that year. She didn't get any recognition for what she did from anybody. The Mom had mentioned it to the guidance staff that my daughter helped him about 4 nights a week for hours, but nobody said anything to her. She got her own personal gratification.
I have had the same thing in the owrkplace, a bank I worked for had these stupid little certificates that anyone could nominate you for. Some people had 10 of them plastered up around their work station, while other hard workers had none. It was just plain childish, and caused resentment and negativity in the workplace. We also had sales quotas, the highest sale people had their techniques at cheating, everyone knew it, but they still got awards...
I could rant on an on!!!
Your daughter is doing what real education should encourage kids to do.
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Old 03-28-2007, 10:57 PM
 
Location: Prospect, KY
5,284 posts, read 20,045,077 times
Reputation: 6666
I raised boys and never got involved in how much homework they had. They did their homework when they came home from school - right after their snack. I prepared dinner while they did their homework. They were expected to do their homework - some weeks it was heavier than others. Often this was because they had procrastinated on an assignment or two. If they had a project to do, I'd take them to the library and remind them of upcoming projects being due, but I never did it for them. I knew their teachers and volunteered in their classrooms and was aware of what they were doing in school.

If our boys failed to turn in a project or do a homework assignment, there were consequences - privileges were taken away - no television, no friends over, no video games, etc., depending on how severe the lapse was. We were pretty tough. We didn't make excuses for our kids when they failed to do things they were expected to do. We didn't blame the teachers - although they didn't always have the greatest teachers, they did have some wonderful ones too. We never complained about a teacher or questioned the amount of work our kids were given and never, never talked about their teachers in any negative way in front of the children.

School is an excellent training ground for real life. School can be tough just like real life. Throughout life there are a myriad of personalities that we often need to get along with. There are good employers, bad employers, nice supervisors, obnoxious supervisors...you don't complain or run to your Mom and Dad with every problem - you learn to deal with it.

All our children are college graduates and gainfully employed and lead happy, productive lives. I think we helped them greatly on their road to adulthood by telling them they could do anything if they set their minds to it and that hard work was a positive thing, rather than micromanaging and second-guessing their teachers and lowering the bar of expectations because we thought they were working too hard. I have a friend who had a slogan written and posted several places in her house so that her children and she and her husband could see it and be reminded ...it read "I can do hard things." I absolutely believe that is what we should be teaching our children.

Our youngest son is a full time law student - he is finishing up is 2nd year with one more to go....finished Magna *** Laude at UCLA. He works at the free legal clinic (has several clients that he is representing right now), works for the public defenders office, is the Lexus Nexus (data base) representative for his college, he is a member of two trial teams that travel the country competing with other top law schools in mock trials, he teaches Sunday School, he speaks fluent Japanese and is a total go-getter in every respect - he loves what he does and is able to handle all the responsibility and pressure because he was brought up to believe that he could do hard things...it empowers kids to be brought up like that.

Last edited by Cattknap; 03-28-2007 at 11:25 PM..
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Old 03-29-2007, 12:01 AM
 
Location: Colorado
1,394 posts, read 4,170,930 times
Reputation: 954
I just want to say I am so proud of my daughter, she has brought home all A'S AND B'S on her report cards this year!!!!
It has been mostly all on her own, I help with her spelling words, we practice every night until her test, but SHE does it all on her own. I am one proud mother, she has been able to keep up just fine now that her normal teacher is back. I know my report card was never like hers, and I kid her all the time about teaching me how to do some of the work, she just says it's easy. Yeah right, not for us old people.
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Old 03-29-2007, 04:01 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
4,472 posts, read 17,693,098 times
Reputation: 4095
Quote:
I just want to say I am so proud of my daughter, she has brought home all A'S AND B'S on her report cards this year!!!!
Congrats, I think my report card was all D's and F's. Glad to hear she is excelling.
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Old 03-29-2007, 04:11 PM
 
Location: Colorado
1,394 posts, read 4,170,930 times
Reputation: 954
Smile Mine tooooooo!!!!!!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by SpeedyAZ View Post
Congrats, I think my report card was all D's and F's. Glad to hear she is excelling.
Mine was about the same, that is why I am so proud, she sure doesn't get much help from me, heck I can hardly understand that stuff they are doing in 6th grade. Give me the basics, then maybe!!!!!
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Old 04-21-2007, 05:06 PM
 
Location: Cleveland
2 posts, read 7,091 times
Reputation: 10
Default Homework

As principal of a school and teacher of sixth and seventh grade math I can not emphasize the value of homework enough. The most important thing however is that homework must be an extension of the days lesson and the goal must be to increase mastery of the subject matter. If the homework is "busy work" is a waste of the student as well as the teachers time. I suggest that a middle schooler should spend a hour to a hour and a half on homework per day, including reading. I have seen my students test scores rise through the roof because the homework is a direct extension of what was taught on that day. My 100% minority students were the highest scoring math students in our district on the statewide math test and 36% of my sixth graders scored in the 90 percentile on their STANFORD 10 National Math Test. I believe that the homework I assign have helped them a great deal. I also think that 3 hours spent on homework is much better then 3 hours of video-games and television. However the homework must be reasonable and the student must have good instructions to complete it. I also maintain that the student must be familiar with what is assigned in order for the homework not become the responsibility of the parent. Homework is a great educational tool that is sometimes abused by teachers or given as punishment - not good. I do not assign homework on weekend as I believe the student should enjoy the weekend. I encourage reading a good book over weekends though.
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Old 04-23-2007, 08:54 PM
TCK
 
Location: Rio Rancho, NM
166 posts, read 565,359 times
Reputation: 94
Default I am one of those Moms

that would prefer there be no homework. Learn in school. Come home and sit and have a snack, talk to me. Then go out and play basketball, baseball, football or just hang out and play with your peers.

Be educated. Be healthy mentally and physically. It's a balance.

I remember thinking no wonder the kids today have high cholesterol, are overweight, diabetics, etc. This I thought when my elementary school child only had PE once a week.
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