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Old 10-24-2008, 09:54 AM
QCP
 
185 posts, read 438,288 times
Reputation: 134

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Quote:
Originally Posted by NCN View Post
I read an article years ago on the salaries of teachers and comparative jobs. The teachers actually made more per hour than the business employee. My daughter used to be a manager in a department store. She worked 6 days a week and 10 hours a day. I think a teaching job would be a walk in the park after a schedule like that.
It's rationale like this that makes teaching such a difficult profession. Unfortunately, many people lack the ability to see the big picture. The result - children and parents with no repect for the teacher or administration decisions.

For starters, it is rather difficult to measure total impact on society when comparing a department store manager and an educator. That's a ridiculous comparison.

Secondly, teachers are paid salary - not hourly. I know very view teachers that only work 7-3 and then go home for the night and forget about it. Throw in coaching and extra-curricular activites and I think many teachers would love to only work a 60 hour week. summers??? What a joke. Most of them have to spend the entire summer in school to continue their certification or working summer jobs to support their families.

So, until your daughter starts selling T-shirts that impact the world, maybe you need to take a closer look at your perspective.

I would also like to add: Yes, many teachers leave because of pay, but the majority leave because when reality smacks them in the face...the realize they can not hack it. It's a much tougher job than outsiders believe it to be.
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Old 10-24-2008, 10:15 AM
 
Location: Ohio
1,132 posts, read 1,900,490 times
Reputation: 391
Quote:
Originally Posted by QCP View Post
It's rationale like this that makes teaching such a difficult profession. Unfortunately, many people lack the ability to see the big picture. The result - children and parents with no repect for the teacher or administration decisions.

For starters, it is rather difficult to measure total impact on society when comparing a department store manager and an educator. That's a ridiculous comparison.

Secondly, teachers are paid salary - not hourly. I know very view teachers that only work 7-3 and then go home for the night and forget about it. Throw in coaching and extra-curricular activites and I think many teachers would love to only work a 60 hour week. summers??? What a joke. Most of them have to spend the entire summer in school to continue their certification or working summer jobs to support their families.

So, until your daughter starts selling T-shirts that impact the world, maybe you need to take a closer look at your perspective.

I would also like to add: Yes, many teachers leave because of pay, but the majority leave because when reality smacks them in the face...the realize they can not hack it. It's a much tougher job than outsiders believe it to be.
So your job is so much more important than everyone elses job? Let me tell you something, my mother is a waitress at a local restaurant and I GUARANTEE she as done more for education and educational development in this town than half of our current public school system teachers ever have. She works 10 to 14 hours a day EVERY day, she does more fund raisers for local charities and educational endeavors than anyone else in this town. Last year she was able to bring in ten thousand dollars to the local library to buy new books. A teachers impact on the world, on paper, is significant...problem is they actually have to teach well. And from my own experiences going through school I can tell you that almost half of all teachers just plain SUCK.
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Old 10-24-2008, 10:57 AM
QCP
 
185 posts, read 438,288 times
Reputation: 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kereczr View Post
So your job is so much more important than everyone elses job? Let me tell you something, my mother is a waitress at a local restaurant and I GUARANTEE she as done more for education and educational development in this town than half of our current public school system teachers ever have. She works 10 to 14 hours a day EVERY day, she does more fund raisers for local charities and educational endeavors than anyone else in this town. Last year she was able to bring in ten thousand dollars to the local library to buy new books. A teachers impact on the world, on paper, is significant...problem is they actually have to teach well. And from my own experiences going through school I can tell you that almost half of all teachers just plain SUCK.
No. You missed my point. For starters, I am not a teacher. I used to be. It was my passion, but quickly I realized that I could not raise a family on a teacher's salary. That's unfortunate, because I truly loved it and more importantly, I was very good at it. I truly feel as though that is what I was meant to do. I am now running my own busiess, with success, but without that passion.

My point was, outside of the home, teachers often have the greatest ability to make a direct impact on a child's life. Something, I can not do in my current position. Sure my children will reap the benefits of my hard work, but I can no longer continue to make positive influences on so many other needy children. For instance, I taught and coached. But more importantly (in the area that I worked) I served as a mentor, even a father-figure if you will to many fatherless young boys. To me that is far more important to the world than the day-to-day work I do now. However, my main priority is, as it should be, my own children, therefore due to economic issues, I had to leave the educational profession and jump into the business world.

No single job is more important than another. What I was referring to is IMPACT, not importance. All of our jobs impact our home, but how many impact the world?

Yes, there are some sorry teachers. I agree. Many actually. But for every sorry teacher you know, 5 great ones have left the profession because of pay (especially men).

As for your mother. She should be commended for all of her hard work and dedication. It is community people like her, that makes the school communities great. It's very simple - If you look at all of the great communities in our nation, they have one common thread, they all value education. They don't complain about teacher pay. They don't complain about educational taxes. They realize the more they put in, the more they get back.
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Old 10-24-2008, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Ohio
1,132 posts, read 1,900,490 times
Reputation: 391
Quote:
Originally Posted by QCP View Post
No. You missed my point. For starters, I am not a teacher. I used to be. It was my passion, but quickly I realized that I could not raise a family on a teacher's salary. That's unfortunate, because I truly loved it and more importantly, I was very good at it. I truly feel as though that is what I was meant to do. I am now running my own busiess, with success, but without that passion.

My point was, outside of the home, teachers often have the greatest ability to make a direct impact on a child's life. Something, I can not do in my current position. Sure my children will reap the benefits of my hard work, but I can no longer continue to make positive influences on so many other needy children. For instance, I taught and coached. But more importantly (in the area that I worked) I served as a mentor, even a father-figure if you will to many fatherless young boys. To me that is far more important to the world than the day-to-day work I do now. However, my main priority is, as it should be, my own children, therefore due to economic issues, I had to leave the educational profession and jump into the business world.

No single job is more important than another. What I was referring to is IMPACT, not importance. All of our jobs impact our home, but how many impact the world?

Yes, there are some sorry teachers. I agree. Many actually. But for every sorry teacher you know, 5 great ones have left the profession because of pay (especially men).

As for your mother. She should be commended for all of her hard work and dedication. It is community people like her, that makes the school communities great. It's very simple - If you look at all of the great communities in our nation, they have one common thread, they all value education. They don't complain about teacher pay. They don't complain about educational taxes. They realize the more they put in, the more they get back.
+1 rep, i get yah now ^_~
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Old 10-24-2008, 03:29 PM
 
901 posts, read 2,497,561 times
Reputation: 556
Am I the only one who noticed that the OP started this (ridiculous) thread and has not had anything else to say?
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Old 10-24-2008, 03:54 PM
 
12,229 posts, read 25,366,618 times
Reputation: 6682
Quote:
Originally Posted by killer2021 View Post
I see this all the time, teachers complaining non stop about how they don't get paid enough on and on. Yet, I see no shortage of teachers and from the looks of it the retention rate for teachers is very high. To further my case, I see a lot of people who are trying to get teaching jobs. Seems like they get paid too much considering how many qualified people are looking for teaching jobs.
I did. Looks like a post and run! Perhaps killer is back in class. From another post, it sounds like he or she is a 20 year old.
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Old 10-24-2008, 05:32 PM
 
74 posts, read 245,598 times
Reputation: 53
I work and live in IL as a teacher and find it to be a great profession on many levels. We get paid well, you'll never hear us complain about pay. I have looked at a lot of other states in terms of pay, and some are rough! A friend of mine moved to Tulsa and tried to talk me into moving out there. He lives in a very afluent area and when I checked the local payscale for teachers, with a doctorate in education and 8 years experience, a H.S. teacher would make something like 41k a year! On the other side of it, he bought a home for 180k that would cost 500k in Chicago land.

Teaching is a true labor of love. I went to private schools my whole life and those teachers get paid very very little. At this point teaching in public education I out earn the principal of the private school I went to. But, those teachers love their jobs so much they get summer jobs to make ends meet. Pushing money aspects aside and focusing on their love of teaching is an attitude more need to have. As long as you can put food on the table and pay a modest mortgage, expect never to be rich in education but certianly never to be poor.

Isn't the one of the roles of a teacher to live modestly and love what they do?
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Old 10-24-2008, 08:13 PM
 
Location: Central NJ
517 posts, read 1,581,933 times
Reputation: 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kereczr View Post
So your job is so much more important than everyone elses job? Let me tell you something, my mother is a waitress at a local restaurant and I GUARANTEE she as done more for education and educational development in this town than half of our current public school system teachers ever have. She works 10 to 14 hours a day EVERY day, she does more fund raisers for local charities and educational endeavors than anyone else in this town. Last year she was able to bring in ten thousand dollars to the local library to buy new books. A teachers impact on the world, on paper, is significant...problem is they actually have to teach well. And from my own experiences going through school I can tell you that almost half of all teachers just plain SUCK.

I'm not sure here but I think you didn't read all of the messages. I hope you do. That post wasn't to put anyone down or anyone's profession. It was a comment on another post. I don't think that post was to put anyone down it was in response to another. Please go back and read it. I agree with that post and I would never put down anyone's job. Everyone's job is important.

Some teachers aren't very good but many are. Some waitresses are very good and some aren't. This is true in any job/profession.
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Old 10-24-2008, 08:18 PM
 
Location: Central NJ
517 posts, read 1,581,933 times
Reputation: 167
Kereczr -
hah-sorry, I didn't read the response from QCP.

I'm very tired today- conference nights just caught up to me.
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Old 10-24-2008, 09:35 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
555 posts, read 983,962 times
Reputation: 639
This has probably been brought up before in the previous 8 pages I didn't read. However, I want to reply to the original question.

First off, why do teachers get paid less than some other less important professions, i.e. professional atheletes? It's simple economics. There are far more teachers than there are professional atheletes. Not everyone can be the next Michael Jordan or Tiger Woods. It is far easier to get a B.A. in Elementary Education.

Now it's time for me to offend the easily offended. The original poster seemed to think there were a lot of teachers. I agree. Why is this? Well in part it's due to the fact that Education is one of the easiest things to major in. Being a teacher is a respectable job. Many people who find that they aren't able to make it in what they really want to major in, Psychology, Nursing, English, etc. change their major to Education.

I have a friend who just graduated with his B.A. in Education. He chose the major not because he had to, but because he enjoyed it. He was telling me about how many of the Education majors in his classes were only there beacuse they were failing classes in their other, first major. He once told me that he heard a fellow Education major telling her friends that the only reason she wanted to be a teacher was so that she could coach cheerleading. She said teaching would be an easy job - all she would have to do would be to get in front of the class and read. Are these the kinds of people you want teaching your kids?

Now I'm not saying that all teachers are this way. But I don't really think that the girl I mentioned above should be in a classroom.

And no, I don't support No Child Left Behind.
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