U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-14-2009, 09:06 PM
 
4,218 posts, read 7,854,441 times
Reputation: 4973

Advertisements

I'm curious, what are current methods of punishment in elementary schools? I inadvertently learned that our teacher in K makes a child sit at his/her desk with his/her head down. If it happened during recess, he/she will sit for the duration of the recess.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-15-2009, 08:19 AM
 
2,838 posts, read 8,846,159 times
Reputation: 2857
My own kids don't go to school, but I have heard from friends that the "stoplight" discipline method is popular... if they act up, they go from "green" to "yellow" and then finally to "red." Actually, I guess that's the warning method... I'm not sure what happens when they get to red. I want to say they go visit the principal, but that could just be my assumption from my own school days, when you were either sent to sit outside the classroom in the hallway, or sent to the principal's office.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2009, 08:41 AM
 
14 posts, read 53,428 times
Reputation: 11
I have a son in kindergarten and daughter in 4th grade in SW Michigan and they also use the stoplight discipline method. Each teacher has a board in their classroom with little pouches of the students names and a green, yellow, orange and red card. Each student starts off the day on green. If the student receives a verbal warning they are told to flip their card to yellow. If a student receives a second warning and has to flip their card to orange they receive a 10 min timeout. This means that they lose the first 10 minutes of recess. If the student flips their card to red the student must call his or her parent and explain what they did to get to red. This method works very well and students very rarely get to red.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2009, 10:42 AM
 
Location: CA
830 posts, read 2,285,053 times
Reputation: 1003
I'm K, I use the color cards too. It's ok. For red, it's usually contact with the parent. Or if it was something highly aggressive (generally what someone would get to "red" for - gouging an eyeball, biting, etc.), I would send them down to the principal. I never sent a K to the principal last year. This year I have one who regularly claws faces, bites, throws chairs, etc, so he does go now and then, for the safety of the rest. I've got another one who throws screaming tantrums and I'd never be able to get anything done with the others over the racket, so he goes sometimes too. That's not "red" behavior though. It's just "When you're quiet enough to come back to class, do". He likes being in class, hates missing things so it's few and far between when he throws those screaming fits anymore.

Heads down I'd generally only do if many of them are out of control loud and we need a moment to regroup as a class.

If someone was pushing or goofing in line, they'd go back to their seat, show me they were calm enough to rejoin the line, and then go to the end of the line. One kid (Eye Gouger again) carries a heavy box "for me" when he's in line, to keep his hands immobilized.

If someone is repeatedly being a disturbance at their group table, they would be moved to another table until the end of that activity.

Last week one of the kids (the eye gouger) was messing around in Math, running up to the overhead to snatch it from me, throwing his counting noodles, etc. So, since he missed 25 minutes of math due to those antics, he sat with me and redid the lesson 1:1 for 25 minutes during the time when the others have free play. I wouldn't use that method with someone who got off on the 1:1 lesson though. It only worked because he would have much prefered to be doing Legos.

Mostly I prefer to use a culture of "teamwork" that I really work hard to cultivate in the class. We go over the rules at the start of every day, and every one of them can tell me the "why" of those rules, in terms of "Why this is good teamwork". When I see good "team work" I put beads in a jar. A jar full of beads = a favored class activity for all of us to participate in, again, as a team (upcoming is a tea party). Individually, they earn privilege passes for "green days". After accumulating 5 days on green, they can pick a pass for a special activity during group time - right now it is computer, easel painting, or a Lego table. By offering several choices I am more assured that the privilege is one that is motivating for that particular student, and I like that it is an "activity" reward instead of a "material" one.

Anyway, no days are perfect but I think I've got a system that works and I definitely have a group of kids who are empathetic and motivated to help each other (except for Eye Gouger, but even him sometimes).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2009, 12:08 PM
 
1,986 posts, read 3,467,232 times
Reputation: 1288
In the local elementary school, they have what they call a 'planning room'. Every time one student so much as touches another student in any way, or if there is anything that can be remotely construed as an infraction of any kind, they are sent to the 'planning room'. There they have to write what they did on a piece of paper (a different color depending on the severity of the crime) and sign it. Then they get a talking to by the person (a man) whose job it is to sit there and wait for kids to enter this room.

It's an intimidating tactic (the principal agreed). I guess the papers they had to sign went into the student's records, I don't know.

I used to tell my daughter that there was nothing that they could do that meant anything. The planning room meant nothing. School records mean nothing. All that mattered was that she did her best and not be intimidated by anybody in that school.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2009, 01:29 PM
 
2,838 posts, read 8,846,159 times
Reputation: 2857
Quote:
Originally Posted by stormy night View Post
In the local elementary school, they have what they call a 'planning room'. Every time one student so much as touches another student in any way, or if there is anything that can be remotely construed as an infraction of any kind, they are sent to the 'planning room'. There they have to write what they did on a piece of paper (a different color depending on the severity of the crime) and sign it. Then they get a talking to by the person (a man) whose job it is to sit there and wait for kids to enter this room.

It's an intimidating tactic (the principal agreed). I guess the papers they had to sign went into the student's records, I don't know.

I used to tell my daughter that there was nothing that they could do that meant anything. The planning room meant nothing. School records mean nothing. All that mattered was that she did her best and not be intimidated by anybody in that school.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2009, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Ocean Shores, WA
5,082 posts, read 12,584,520 times
Reputation: 10543
We used the Friday Point System.

Whenever you did something bad during the week, you got points.
On Friday afternoon, the rest of the class beat the crap out of the kid who got the most points during the week.

This worked pretty good until we got a new kid who was not only bad, but also big, mean, and could whip everybodyís butt.

So the teacher tried a variation of the Point System where you got points for being good. The kid with the most points got a candy bar on Friday afternoon.

This didnít work either because the big, bad kid would just beat you up and take it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2009, 04:35 PM
 
3,422 posts, read 9,438,161 times
Reputation: 1957
My kids are all in elem school.

My younger kids have the stoplight system. One of the punishments used is standing in a particular area during recess for a prescribed amount of time before being allowed to go play.

My older child's teacher has a book that you sign into with each infraction. A certain number of times in the book and you go see the principal to tell him why you got in the book so much and to discuss ways to improve behavior in the future.

For major infractions from the older kids, there is an in-school suspension room that also doubles as the "go to the office" room for shorter periods of time for the younger kids.

I remember when I was a kid if the teacher turned off the light and made us all put our heads down we were really in trouble.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2009, 04:38 PM
 
901 posts, read 2,611,582 times
Reputation: 562
Quote:
Originally Posted by stormy night View Post
In the local elementary school, they have what they call a 'planning room'. Every time one student so much as touches another student in any way, or if there is anything that can be remotely construed as an infraction of any kind, they are sent to the 'planning room'. There they have to write what they did on a piece of paper (a different color depending on the severity of the crime) and sign it. Then they get a talking to by the person (a man) whose job it is to sit there and wait for kids to enter this room.

It's an intimidating tactic (the principal agreed). I guess the papers they had to sign went into the student's records, I don't know.

I used to tell my daughter that there was nothing that they could do that meant anything. The planning room meant nothing. School records mean nothing. All that mattered was that she did her best and not be intimidated by anybody in that school.
Interesting. We have a suspension room. Before a child can go, you have to fill out a form and state what the child did and how you tried to handle it yourself. The principal has to sign the form. I've only gone through the whole process once with an extremely disruptive student.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2009, 05:08 PM
 
Location: CA
830 posts, read 2,285,053 times
Reputation: 1003
Quote:
I used to tell my daughter that there was nothing that they could do that meant anything. The planning room meant nothing. School records mean nothing. All that mattered was that she did her best and not be intimidated by anybody in that school.
I'd sure love it if my Eye Gouger's parents were as supportive as this, and told him that it didn't matter how many people he hurt as long as he'd tried his best.

Oh wait, they do. Possibly one reason why he's still gouging eyes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top