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Old 09-26-2009, 05:22 PM
 
1,450 posts, read 3,480,895 times
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I finally got my son out of special ed. Basically, you can take them out anytime. Request a dismissal ARD that's what the D in ARD stands for Dismissal. Write up something to the effect that you request to discontinue any further special ed services.

They didn't like it, tried to keep the IEP open with modifications, yadda, yadda, but I stood my ground. legally, they can't force your kid onto a program without your consent, although they try to make you think they can.

My son was diagnosed with ADHD, which I doubt, and placed in Spec Ed about 3 years ago. His school experience has been negative since then. he detests being pulled out for "rosources" it was affecting his peer relationships, and basically benefiting the school via funding, and giving the teachers an excuse for not teaching him.

The IEP became a license to nit pick, his every move was hyper analyzed, he was constantly being "redirected" if he so much as looked up or took a breath he would be "gently redirected" he said he got so nervous being "watched" all the time.

I feel he's done his part to help the school, now let the school do their job and educate him without all the crap.
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Old 09-26-2009, 05:24 PM
 
Location: The High Seas
6,682 posts, read 11,269,648 times
Reputation: 9533
Quote:
It's an awfully big leap to accuse the school of lying about her scores.
I see it all the time. I've read hundreds of reports over the years and there are a fair number that are unsubstantiated. Sometimes the parent pushes so hard for inclusion or it's a teacher who provides anecdotal "evidence" that convince the school psych to go along and make a case for special education.
I'm a school psych. What is your background?
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Old 09-26-2009, 05:26 PM
 
Location: The High Seas
6,682 posts, read 11,269,648 times
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Quote:
They're not mutually exclusive either.
Please cite one study that links a math disability with CAPD.
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Old 09-26-2009, 05:40 PM
 
Location: where my heart is
5,642 posts, read 6,771,480 times
Reputation: 1661
I had the opposite situation. I wanted her kept in special ed and the school wanted to mainstream her. I told them maybe eventually she would be ready, but not in 3rd grade. They overruled me. I was right. She started failing and have more behaviors. They had to put her back in special ed. However, by middle school she was doing fine on her own.

Although she was still eligible for special services in HS, and COLLEGE, she declined them herself and did fine. Today she is a certified teacher working on her Masters.

Don't push them too fast when they are not ready.
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Old 09-26-2009, 05:47 PM
Status: "Not hardly" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
27,068 posts, read 31,815,463 times
Reputation: 32172
In my system parents are pushing to get their kids an IEP or 504. They've been told that the kid can't then fail a class. They also have been told the kid will be eligible for SSI.
I had a conference the other day for a kid that I've had for 3 years in various classes whose mother is now claiming is borderline autistic, no documentation provided, of course.
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Old 09-26-2009, 06:38 PM
 
Location: Midwest transplant
1,878 posts, read 4,265,595 times
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You can keep the IEP open and direct which/when services will be provided. If she only needs 1/2 hour per week of study skills or reinforcement, she could get it. Also, more and more schools are using push-ins to assist all students who are on IEP's. There is not a hard and fast rule about "how" her IEP will be followed. The services or adaptations are worked out with the team, and the teacher is required to follow them.
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Old 09-26-2009, 09:37 PM
pll pll started this thread
 
1,021 posts, read 1,905,375 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TANaples View Post
I had the opposite situation. I wanted her kept in special ed and the school wanted to mainstream her. I told them maybe eventually she would be ready, but not in 3rd grade. They overruled me. I was right. She started failing and have more behaviors. They had to put her back in special ed. However, by middle school she was doing fine on her own..
This is a perfect example of a mom who trusts her instincts. Who knows their child better then the parents?

Last edited by pll; 09-26-2009 at 09:52 PM..
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Old 09-26-2009, 09:52 PM
pll pll started this thread
 
1,021 posts, read 1,905,375 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snort View Post
Math issues and CAPD don't go together. The IEP team probably finagled the scores to "help" her qualify. WIth CAPD, there is a natural correlation to problems with Basic Reading Skills. Much harder to make the claim that her Central Auditory Processing Disorder was causing math difficulties..
I'm not sure what they did. Word problems in math were harder for her to understand. Aren't they a little more difficult for everyone though? Math may always be harder for her but we aren't mathematicians in my family.
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Old 09-26-2009, 10:04 PM
pll pll started this thread
 
1,021 posts, read 1,905,375 times
Reputation: 970
Quote:
Originally Posted by marylee54 View Post
I finally got my son out of special ed. Basically, you can take them out anytime. Request a dismissal ARD that's what the D in ARD stands for Dismissal. Write up something to the effect that you request to discontinue any further special ed services.

They didn't like it, tried to keep the IEP open with modifications, yadda, yadda, but I stood my ground. legally, they can't force your kid onto a program without your consent, although they try to make you think they can.

My son was diagnosed with ADHD, which I doubt, and placed in Spec Ed about 3 years ago. His school experience has been negative since then. he detests being pulled out for "rosources" it was affecting his peer relationships, and basically benefiting the school via funding, and giving the teachers an excuse for not teaching him.

The IEP became a license to nit pick, his every move was hyper analyzed, he was constantly being "redirected" if he so much as looked up or took a breath he would be "gently redirected" he said he got so nervous being "watched" all the time.

I feel he's done his part to help the school, now let the school do their job and educate him without all the crap.
I agree with you. My daughter felt the same way about leaving class. I was with her when about five of her friends from her Brownie troupe found out she went to resource for math. They looked at her like they were shocked. She felt embarrased and turned red. Another classmate mentioned last year that if you go to resouce that means you are dumb.
I don't remember the IEP program when I grew up and I'm sure something like it existed. It seems like more and more kids are participating in it now and I'm not sure they all need to be there. She had 6 from her class of 20 attend last for various subjects. Yikes! That seems like a lot.
Just curious if this is because of the "NO Child Left Behind" law?
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Old 09-26-2009, 11:17 PM
 
Location: Country of BIGOTS and HATERS
18,322 posts, read 19,089,900 times
Reputation: 7007
Quote:
Originally Posted by pll View Post
Why is there so much red tape connected to pulling a child out of the IEP program? Maybe a educator can answer this for me. Does the school get extra money from the government? Are they afraid of getting sued by a parent if the child drops out?

When I taught in Michigan all the parent (or student over 18) had to do was sign a refusal of service IEP..since a parent can call for a new IEP anytime...most schools in Michigan were all too glad to exit a SpEd student..
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