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Old 03-15-2010, 04:12 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
9,477 posts, read 16,446,813 times
Reputation: 13184

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aconite View Post
I have to go on record as saying "snowflake" is particularly offensive in this context.
I agree. I used to feel the same way until I got dxed with it myself and learned everything I could on the subject and from what syracusa has said, it sounds highly likely that it could be the case with him, and nowhere do I get the feeling that he's a "precious little snowflake." I also agree with her that it's not as much a disorder as it is an inability to fit in with a sick society.

Consider this--it's highly likely that Daniel Boone had AD/HD--he couldn't sit still in a schoolroom and couldn't even spell his own name [sic], so he did what any redblooded American boy would do, if given the opportunity. He lit out for the territories and became famous for what he did best. How many little D. Boone's are out there rotting in a schoolroom chair b/c the school can't teach them anything relevant? More than a few I'll bet you. So are we disordered or are the demands of a modern society? And I'm not even complaining about the fact that I no longer have to worry about losing my kids to some disease b/c of a lack of antibiotics--we could do it better, and the people who can envision a better world are the ones with vision, and you know who I'm talking about. That's right--our precious little snowflakes--and they all are you know, not just the upper class kids--they all should be given the opportunity to do what they do best. Too bad there's no more territories--I'd light out fer 'em meself. Oh, no internet. N. mind.
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Old 03-15-2010, 04:16 PM
 
6,585 posts, read 22,409,761 times
Reputation: 3170
I wouldn't overthink it too much - yet. When my son was that age and difficult in many of the same ways, he scored moderate on this test: Childbrain.com - PDD assessment scale/screening questionnaire but within years many of those things went away. So there can be something to say for having an evaluation done too soon.

My son did end up with ADHD dx, along with dyslexia, dysgraphia, dyscalculia, delayed fine motor skills and a few other things that I have since resolved, plus speech issues. He went to a private LD school for grades 3-8 and really he should have been there starting at kindergarten, but I was getting a lot of feed back saying, he's fine, he's gifted, etc. He does have above average intelligence, but it's not that useful if you have other issues to contend with although it may help the kid compensate. He's in a regular high school now totally mainstreamed and unmedicated. (He was medicated for the LD school as they require ADHD kids to be medicated since they just aren't teachable without it.) We are losing probably a letter grade in all academic classes by not using meds, but it's cool, it's still passing.

So, I guess my point is, yes, there may be issues, but some may go away on their own. Some may need intervention. (I'm a big fan of occupational therapy.) Some may just be "differences" and not necessarily dx's. Course, the biggest thing is not to let schools pigeon-hole your child as a behavior problem when it's really learning difficulties.

Is he in preschool? I had a lot of warning from preschool teachers. They had never seen a child avoid little pre-reading activities such as coloring the letter "A" before. He wanted nothing to do with coloring, arts and crafts, tracing, learning to write his name, using scissors - nothing involving fine motor skills.

Last edited by FarNorthDallas; 03-15-2010 at 09:43 PM..
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Old 03-15-2010, 09:52 PM
 
4,044 posts, read 5,957,204 times
Reputation: 3819
Quote:
Originally Posted by FarNorthDallas View Post
I wouldn't overthink it too much - yet. When my son was that age and difficult in many of the same ways, he scored moderate on this test: Childbrain.com - PDD assessment scale/screening questionnaire but within years many of those things went away. So there can be something to say for having an evaluation done too soon.

My son did end up with ADHD dx, along with dyslexia, dysgraphia, dyscalculia, delayed fine motor skills and a few other things that I have since resolved, plus speech issues. He went to a private LD school for grades 3-8 and really he should have been there starting at kindergarten, but I was getting a lot of feed back saying, he's fine, he's gifted, etc. He does have above average intelligence, but it's not that useful if you have other issues to content with although it may help the kid compensate. He's in a regular high school now totally mainstreamed and unmedicated. (He was medicated for the LD school as they require ADHD kids to be medicated since they just aren't teachable without it.) We are losing probably a letter grade in all academic classes by not using meds, but it's cool, it's still passing.

So, I guess my point is, yes, there may be issues, but some may go away on their own. Some may need intervention. (I'm a big fan of occupational therapy.) Some may just be "differences" and not necessarily dx's. Course, the biggest thing is not to let schools pigeon-hole your child as a behavior problem when it's really learning difficulties.

Is he in preschool? I had a lot of warning from preschool teachers. They had never seen a child avoid little pre-reading activities such as coloring the letter "A" before. He wanted nothing to do with coloring, arts and crafts, tracing, learning to write his name, using scissors - nothing involving fine motor skills.
Thank you FarNorthDallas for the link and the details about your son.
From what you and others have said here, he may, after all, be within normal range. He often comes home from preschool with pre-reading activities done (such as some letter traced, colored etc) and even though the coloring itself is extremely clumsy and careless, it's something he accomplished (he colors almost the entire page, instead of just the object in question).

At home, he will do a little bit of such activities if I expose him to them and insist a little - though I never force him if he outright refuses. He can write his name now, as his preschool requires the kids to "sign in" when they arrive; otherwise, he won't try to "write" anything. Or draw.
He seems to have some interest in cutting out pictures with scissors and he does a pretty good job at it, but as with everything else, he is not really "engulfed" in this activity either. He just doesn't spend enough time to count as "real interest" on anything.

But he could squeeze those stuffed animals making squeaky, high noises for an eternity.
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Old 03-16-2010, 07:23 AM
 
20,793 posts, read 52,465,124 times
Reputation: 10476
One area you may want to explore is Sensory Integration. Many early childhood programs will deal with this for kids not yet in school. Do your schools do preschool screening of any type? Our state does a screening at 3 and then again right before kindergarten. This is one area, out of many, they address. Check with your district and see if they have anyone trained in this area.
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Old 03-16-2010, 06:53 PM
 
999 posts, read 4,188,810 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stepka View Post
Hmm interesting. I won't pretend to be an expert, and certainly he is awfully young anyway, but I will say that AD/HD and giftedness are often coexistent.
As I read the OP I thought the same thing. No reason to think it has to be one or the other...or either for that matter. He does seem rather like a typical 4 yr old, but if you are concerned no reason to wait to have an assessment by a developmental pediatrician. If nothing else they can alleviate your concerns, or they can have a good baseline assessment and you can follow up in 6 mos or a year if concerns are still present.
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Old 12-14-2010, 04:54 PM
 
1 posts, read 1,152 times
Reputation: 10
hello i'm new here. But we have been dealing w/ "adhd" junk for 4yrs. now I totally agree w/ you. The system is broken NOT MY CHILD. the schools need to accomodate ALL styles of learning. Two pegs might not both fit the same hole. Im currently fighting to get my son his due education w/out sedation! it's hard and i fear greatly for his future. When child is disruptive (being him/her self) the teacher has to act. What is she/he to do when the only option is dicipline. My son deserves an education like all children do. But he does NOT have to be pilled to succeed. Sorry for rambling im just very passionate on this subjest. i fear it will not be resolved while my son is schooled. So where does that leave him & all the other children (boys) of non-ignorant parents? Cleaning out a jail cell to be ready for them!?
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Old 12-14-2010, 06:33 PM
 
15,795 posts, read 13,215,809 times
Reputation: 19683
Quote:
Originally Posted by myson'svoice View Post
hello i'm new here. But we have been dealing w/ "adhd" junk for 4yrs. now I totally agree w/ you. The system is broken NOT MY CHILD. the schools need to accomodate ALL styles of learning. Two pegs might not both fit the same hole. Im currently fighting to get my son his due education w/out sedation! it's hard and i fear greatly for his future. When child is disruptive (being him/her self) the teacher has to act. What is she/he to do when the only option is dicipline. My son deserves an education like all children do. But he does NOT have to be pilled to succeed. Sorry for rambling im just very passionate on this subjest. i fear it will not be resolved while my son is schooled. So where does that leave him & all the other children (boys) of non-ignorant parents? Cleaning out a jail cell to be ready for them!?
This may have rated its own thread instead of digging up and old one but ok.

I agree that your son may not need adhd medication and it is absolutely your right to make that decision for your family, that being said other children certainly do benefit from it so maybe we shouldn't paint all children with the same brush.

So regardless of his medication or not, some children due to behavior problems are not suited to a mainstream classroom. All children are entitled to a quality education but that may mean for many children to be free from a constantly disruptive child. I have no idea whether your child is disruptive or is the one being disruptive but his/her teacher would be the best one to decide that as they are the one in the room with them.

If the school is saying your child is disruptive and requires discipline above and beyond that of a typical child in that age/peer group, why not suggest they move him to a classroom with a teacher specially trained to deal with those types of discipline issues?
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Old 12-16-2010, 08:39 PM
 
Location: compton
138 posts, read 299,879 times
Reputation: 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by FarNorthDallas View Post
I wouldn't overthink it too much - yet. When my son was that age and difficult in many of the same ways, he scored moderate on this test: Childbrain.com - PDD assessment scale/screening questionnaire but within years many of those things went away. So there can be something to say for having an evaluation done too soon.

My son did end up with ADHD dx, along with dyslexia, dysgraphia, dyscalculia, delayed fine motor skills and a few other things that I have since resolved, plus speech issues. He went to a private LD school for grades 3-8 and really he should have been there starting at kindergarten, but I was getting a lot of feed back saying, he's fine, he's gifted, etc. He does have above average intelligence, but it's not that useful if you have other issues to contend with although it may help the kid compensate. He's in a regular high school now totally mainstreamed and unmedicated. (He was medicated for the LD school as they require ADHD kids to be medicated since they just aren't teachable without it.) We are losing probably a letter grade in all academic classes by not using meds, but it's cool, it's still passing.

So, I guess my point is, yes, there may be issues, but some may go away on their own. Some may need intervention. (I'm a big fan of occupational therapy.) Some may just be "differences" and not necessarily dx's. Course, the biggest thing is not to let schools pigeon-hole your child as a behavior problem when it's really learning difficulties.

Is he in preschool? I had a lot of warning from preschool teachers. They had never seen a child avoid little pre-reading activities such as coloring the letter "A" before. He wanted nothing to do with coloring, arts and crafts, tracing, learning to write his name, using scissors - nothing involving fine motor skills.
I got 43
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Old 12-17-2010, 06:45 AM
 
2,596 posts, read 4,648,612 times
Reputation: 3949
Quote:
Originally Posted by myson'svoice View Post
hello i'm new here. But we have been dealing w/ "adhd" junk for 4yrs. now I totally agree w/ you. The system is broken NOT MY CHILD. the schools need to accomodate ALL styles of learning. Two pegs might not both fit the same hole. Im currently fighting to get my son his due education w/out sedation! it's hard and i fear greatly for his future. When child is disruptive (being him/her self) the teacher has to act. What is she/he to do when the only option is dicipline. My son deserves an education like all children do. But he does NOT have to be pilled to succeed. Sorry for rambling im just very passionate on this subjest. i fear it will not be resolved while my son is schooled. So where does that leave him & all the other children (boys) of non-ignorant parents? Cleaning out a jail cell to be ready for them!?
Wouldn't it be great if the schools COULD accommodate all styles of learning? Unfortunately, we get what we pay for. Often the same people who want this or that in the classroom are the same ones who refuse to pay for it through tax increases. Many don't even vote for the school board members and state and federal position holders who make those decisions about funding. It's sad. Right now we have a system that doesn't entirely work. The smartest kids are bored. The slowest kids don't get enough support and it's easy for the middle kids get forgotten.

If your son cannot function in a regular ed classroom, then it may not be the right place for him. The teacher is charged with taking 30 kids of all different backgrounds, learning styles, challenges... and trying to teach all 30 of them at once. Yes, he/she can give a LITTLE extra attention to those who need more, but to play the Devil's Advocate, at what point does that become unfair to the other kids? If she has to hover over Bobby's chair the entire period while he throws things, is completely off task, disturbing others, how is that fair to Mary, who never got any help with her spelling? Or Julian who is bright and not being challenged? Or Serena who is an average student? Or Sarah who is learning English and needs extra help too?

Bottom line: teachers can intervene TO A POINT. If your child monopolizes all of the teacher's attention in a room with 30 kids, they do not belong in that room of 30 kids. It's time for a more serious intervention.
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Old 03-22-2011, 06:44 PM
 
11 posts, read 45,788 times
Reputation: 21
Your son does sound verbally 'gifted' and I would nourish that all you can. He could have ADHD but that won't be a big issue until he enters school. Just enrich his strengths and don't worry about ADHD. 2 of my boys have ADHD and have been labeled 'gifted' in the VA school system. My goodness, Einstein had ADHD and wasn't he gifted? Find your son's strengths and focus on them!
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