U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-17-2010, 11:13 AM
 
1,442 posts, read 2,486,812 times
Reputation: 655

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Southern_Transplant View Post
Bias-free and non-judgemental replies are welcome. You prove part of what is said about assumptions. It's not appropriate to assume or imply that I "washed my hands of it" or that I do not work with her. Clearly, this is a "hot-button" issue for you. I'm not interested in a debate about ADHD and will not participate in one with you. Kindly resist the urge to vent.
What might my bias be in this case??

Fact is, nowadays, EVERY kid (ok, maybe like 96% lol) is said to have some degree of ADHD. In this day and age of video games, music videos and all things instant gratification, more kids than ever have not learned to settle down and control their minds to where they can concentrate. Combine that with the fact that it's now "en vogue" to have ADHD, and the trend has tilted grossly towards medication and dysfunctional and/or worthless special education programs. This is not a judgment of you, but rather a judgment of the process people are following these days at the first sight of distractability. I stick by my advice to you. And, let's just say I know a thing or two about the subject.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-17-2010, 11:22 AM
 
1,442 posts, read 2,486,812 times
Reputation: 655
Quote:
Originally Posted by buffy888 View Post
B and D reversals are still fairly common in second grade, at least through the first half of the year or so... still see it in a few students through the end of the year. Is she showing any other signs of dyslexia? Testing for dyslexia is not a bad thing, but I just wanted to let you know that this is still something with see with many of our 2nd graders and it is not always an indicator of dyslexia.

If the school is pushing for IEP over 504, I would ask them to lay out for you the pros and cons of each one and explain why they are pushing for one over the other. They may have a valid reason for it that they haven't explained, but they should be able to back it up with a rationale of some type.

As others have said, an IEP or 504 for ADHD shouldn't affect the type of high school diploma she earns.
I agree with this. The school should be able to provide compelling reasons for "pushing for" an IEP. You'd be surprised how often the school pushes for this when it's only true motive (though unspoken) is to remove a disruptive student from the regular class.

IMO It's simply way too early in the ballgame to react by taking dramatic steps such as those mentioned above with a child at this age.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-17-2010, 04:03 PM
Status: "could've~would've~should've used 'have', not 'of'" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
10,450 posts, read 14,299,056 times
Reputation: 23164
Quote:
Originally Posted by 88txaggie View Post
SpEd and 504 do not have to be life long, they are reevaluated periodically to see if they still are in need of assistance. Get her the assistance now and she might very well learn to compensate for her disability by MS or HS and not need a special plan any more.
It's been a while, but I think at some point I was able to "sign off" on my sons IEP because his goals had been met, and we had no new goals to set. (One of the ADHD goals they set for him was to learn how to break tasks into small bits and to tackle them one at a time.) I don't remember it being any sort of a problem to take him off the IEP.
In TN the gifted program students generally all get IEPs too, it's not considered a big deal to have an IEP here.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2010, 12:52 AM
 
284 posts, read 540,970 times
Reputation: 77
My child has an IEP for 3 years. I am learning the process as I go and I don't know too much about 504. But from everything I read, it seems that the child gets better "protection" under IEP. Say if I request a meeting to discuss the IEP, they are required to respond. I can request an independent evaluation paid by the district if I do not agree (no need to give reason and unless they fight for it) with their evaluation.

However, if you do use an IEP, try to educate yourself as much as you can and do count on the school to help (if they do, you are lucky). I read through the administrative code and spent the last several months to fight their ignorance.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2010, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Eastern time zone
4,469 posts, read 6,330,973 times
Reputation: 3488
IEP versus 504: The difference between an IEP and a 504 plan in regards to children with ADHD and ADD

This might give you a better idea of the differences. There are a couple of sites which offer comparisons, but since this one was specific to ADHD, it seemed preferable.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-01-2010, 11:31 AM
 
Location: St. Augustine Area
118 posts, read 351,464 times
Reputation: 37
I have a child (well now 19) that has ADHD and reading problems. This is very common and can't be ignored. ADHD is a disability if it interferes with your childs ability to learn and from what you have said it is the case. IEP allows the school to do more and offer more services to your daughter for reading. She will not just be able to learn to read better on her own, and don't let anyone tell you differently. You have to stay on top of this or your daughter will be in danger of not ever learning to read properly. That is the experience with my son. He is a 5th year senior and was just put in Special Ed this year and under IEP. He can't pass the standardized tests for graduation and really just can't comprehend what he reads. This is a reading processing disorder and most teachers do not teach in such a way that will help. The act of reading and reading comprehension is a complicated task that requires the left and right brain to communicate and process the info, which is where kids with "dyslexia" or reading disorders have issues. Also, watch your childs ability to write, especially cursive and contact parent advocates in your state to help you navigate this. Normal tutors won't help. Read up on www.wrightslaw.com to learn more info about what you need to do to get your daughter the help she needs, most school systems do not deal with this well.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-01-2010, 11:36 AM
 
Location: St. Augustine Area
118 posts, read 351,464 times
Reputation: 37
By the way my son's high school, didn't want to test him, finally I found www.wrightslaw.com to find out what to do and when they did test him, it was not the correct tests for his age. I had to ask for independent eval and his school still says that he reads just fine. (he's at the 6th grade level reading comp which they think is great) and even under IEP they do not give him the instruction they have outlined. I am now looking for an attorney. They just want him out of school and they are even willing to give him an exception to the FCAT graduation requirement.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-01-2010, 08:51 PM
 
388 posts, read 1,398,234 times
Reputation: 252
Quote:
Originally Posted by skyway31 View Post
What might my bias be in this case??

Fact is, nowadays, EVERY kid (ok, maybe like 96% lol) is said to have some degree of ADHD. In this day and age of video games, music videos and all things instant gratification, more kids than ever have not learned to settle down and control their minds to where they can concentrate. Combine that with the fact that it's now "en vogue" to have ADHD, and the trend has tilted grossly towards medication and dysfunctional and/or worthless special education programs. This is not a judgment of you, but rather a judgment of the process people are following these days at the first sight of distractability. I stick by my advice to you. And, let's just say I know a thing or two about the subject.
Sorry to say, but I don't really agree with you. I have tow sons, 13 and 15, and they both like playing games. The 13 years old is outstanding in school. The 15 yrs old has ADD, and although extremely smart, has trouble concentrating. You are making some generalizations here, and they don't stand. BTW, we choose NOT to put our oldest son on medication, and we are working extremely hard with him every day. He's made tremendous progress in many ways, however, it's still a huge effort for him and us. He is trying very hard to concentrate, but his mind does wonder. My spouse is the same way (they do say it's genetic), and if it were so easy as you make it seem, you would think that a 47 yrs old can be over all that by now...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-01-2010, 08:58 PM
 
3,764 posts, read 7,468,356 times
Reputation: 4028
As a second grade teacher, I agree that we still see "b"/"d" reversals at this grade level. Here's a mnemonic visual that we teach kids:
B-D Reversal Poster

A DRA 20 at this time of year, although it is not at the benchmark of DRA 28, is well on the way to your child really reading. For many kids, this is a celebration. Is there anyway she could qualify for a reading summer school this summer or take part in a private reading program? A good academic boost in reading this summer could potentially get her up to grade level.

Once a child reaches DRA 20, he or she can make great leaps.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-02-2010, 08:23 AM
 
Location: St. Louis
9,593 posts, read 17,162,235 times
Reputation: 13415
Quote:
Originally Posted by lisdol View Post
LOL - that would be a "fail!"
And yet I'm sure it happens, lol. OP, you sound like a very good mom and I'm sure you'll make the right decision--nowhere in your posts did I get the impression that you'd just dump your daughter into the evil clutches of the sped program and then breathe a sigh of relief b/c now you don't have to do anything except put your feet up and eat bonbons. And those meds are great aren't they? They do all the work so you don't have to.

I'm sure you're aware by now that your daughter will have severe organizational issues and you'll need to help her to keep her notebooks straight--one suggestion I read is to have fewer, not more books and keep it really simple. One lady I know used to keep each class's contents in a certain colored totebag--I imagine that's for high school or college though. If she starts to rebel as a teen, you might consider hiring an AD/HD coach. It's a person she'd need to check in with to make sure she's staying on track, and might be a better option with older children. I wish I'd had something like that, but I'm considering hiring my younger daughter to keep the household accounts and get us organized. She has excellent executive functioning capabilitities and every person with AD/HD should have one of those.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top