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Old 05-04-2010, 09:19 AM
 
1,442 posts, read 2,488,038 times
Reputation: 655

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bowian View Post
Okay. If a child can do that. But when it's clear that a child cannot do that, then medication can make a difference.

Two questions:

1. Why is it that folks worry about the "unintended consequences" of ADHD and psychotropic drugs but not of drugs for physical ailments? Both can have unintended consequences and side effects, you know.

2. You do know that ADHD is self-regulation-based disorder, right?
The child doesn't have to do it on his/her own. Parents, psycholgists and anybody else can work with the kid to help them gradually learn to concentrate and manage it themselves. It's not a black and white issue of either a) Kid can control it on his/her own or b) they need drugs.

I'm not one of those folks. I am plenty aware of problems with drugs for other issues as well. Addiction to painkillers is an obvious example.

There are ways to work around a disorder and slowly build towards where you can manage yourself and no longer are impacted by the disorder. Now, once drugs are introduced, it becomes increasingly harder and eventually impossible to do this. Drug use leads to drug dependency. That's why it's best not to start it in the first place.
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Old 05-04-2010, 01:05 PM
 
3,087 posts, read 6,657,517 times
Reputation: 4441
Quote:
Originally Posted by skyway31 View Post
Nope, I've encountered it myself as well. Just not when ability to sit still or pay attention was the issue. Mind you, it's not just self-regulation. You can get outside help from psychologists or...even parents to help. Drugs aren't neccesary if "ADD" is the issue. Now, how do you "know" those people HAD to have medication to function with "ADD"? What remediations were attempted that failed? How long were they tried for? At what age was the person(s) in question declared unable to fucntion without ADD drugs?
I doubt it would make any difference in your opinion and you seem very well cemented into it, however I will answer your question.

One example. Child was initially diagnosed with ADHD, at age 6. At age 7 they added in the diagnosis of ODD and OCD, along with a very high IQ.

Mom quit her job and began a very long and intense study of her child and his issues, which were far more than just being able to sit still and listen. She began with psychological evaluations different than what was used to diagnose him and allergy testing. She also did nutrition studies and sleep studies. She logged everything for several months with the help of his teacher, regarding all the above and any incidences of conflict or violence.

For the next two years she worked diligently to feed him a diet of dye free, sugar free, preservative free, dairy free, fresh foods. She took him weekly for allergy shots to help avert the worst reactions from certain allergens. Heavy mountain cedar counts would send him into a fetal position and something else that I can't remember sent him into stalker like actions towards females. Very bizarre reactions that even the allergist hadn't seen before.

She took him to weekly appointments with a behavioral therapist and an occupational therapist. She worked very closely with his private school on natural consequences, structured schedules, consistent rules and follow through. I know there were some other techniques she tried that were suggested by other parents such as hypnosis and water therapy as well.

Never once did she put him on any type of medication during all that.

After over 4 years of extensive work and a life devoted to changing him, he had made little progress. He had learned coping skills with his ODD and OCD and as long as everything else was aligned perfectly, then he could manage those two. However, if one thing wasn't in line, then all bets were off. He could not control his actions. His mind would race, his heart would race, his body tried to keep up with it all and it was like the tazmanian devil in the cartoons. Sometimes it was a word, a sound, a smell or a particular assignment at school that would topple him.

So, having tried so hard for so long with very little improvement, she asked to try a very small dose of Ritalin just to prove to herself she had been taking the right path all along. Let me tell you that was a very heart wrenching decision for her to make.
She tried it at home after school was out for the summer so that the school didn't have to deal with any repercussions it might cause. She thought she saw a difference right away, but was so convinced it wasn't the right path, that she didn't put any faith in it. She put it away for a couple of months until right before school was to start again.

As he was going into 7th grade the school called to set up a meeting to discuss him attending the next year since they had concerns about how he would handle having to change classes. They had been right alongside her in doing everything they could to help, mainly because she herself was so committed to him and she'd gone above and beyond what most parents do or would have done.

She and her husband both went and although I can't remember the exact words she told me later, but it was the math teacher who made a difference. The math teacher was the best bet to handle her son when he got out of control. He loved math, was a near genius in math, and the teacher just seemed to have a gift in talking her son down.

Anyway, he said something like, if you know you are diabetic do you refuse to take insulin because it's a drug? If you know you have epilepsy do you refuse to take something like diazepam because it's a drug?
Why would you refuse your son something that might make his life so much better, just because it is a drug? Whatever it was he said, she took to heart because she had not considered ADHD meds to be as life saving drugs. What if she was wrong?

She went back to the doctors and did a better study of Ritalin and after learning that it only stays in the system for 4-6 hours and would have no lasting effect if she decided to stop it she decided to actively try it.

She agreed to try it for a week before school started but not tell anyone. It was so very apparent he was engaged in a different way that many of us, who didn't know he was taking it, commented. I even complimented her or such a success she had found during the summer.

It wasn't until about a month after school started that she told anyone other than his teachers. It was simply one of the most amazing things I have ever encountered.

He graduated high school in 2006 with honors and while still taking Ritalin, albeit with dosage changes as he got older and grew more.

So, yeah, she literally tried everything possible.....
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Old 05-04-2010, 03:44 PM
 
1,442 posts, read 2,488,038 times
Reputation: 655
Quote:
Originally Posted by hypocore View Post
I doubt it would make any difference in your opinion and you seem very well cemented into it, however I will answer your question.

One example. Child was initially diagnosed with ADHD, at age 6. At age 7 they added in the diagnosis of ODD and OCD, along with a very high IQ.

Mom quit her job and began a very long and intense study of her child and his issues, which were far more than just being able to sit still and listen. She began with psychological evaluations different than what was used to diagnose him and allergy testing. She also did nutrition studies and sleep studies. She logged everything for several months with the help of his teacher, regarding all the above and any incidences of conflict or violence.

For the next two years she worked diligently to feed him a diet of dye free, sugar free, preservative free, dairy free, fresh foods. She took him weekly for allergy shots to help avert the worst reactions from certain allergens. Heavy mountain cedar counts would send him into a fetal position and something else that I can't remember sent him into stalker like actions towards females. Very bizarre reactions that even the allergist hadn't seen before.

She took him to weekly appointments with a behavioral therapist and an occupational therapist. She worked very closely with his private school on natural consequences, structured schedules, consistent rules and follow through. I know there were some other techniques she tried that were suggested by other parents such as hypnosis and water therapy as well.

Never once did she put him on any type of medication during all that.

After over 4 years of extensive work and a life devoted to changing him, he had made little progress. He had learned coping skills with his ODD and OCD and as long as everything else was aligned perfectly, then he could manage those two. However, if one thing wasn't in line, then all bets were off. He could not control his actions. His mind would race, his heart would race, his body tried to keep up with it all and it was like the tazmanian devil in the cartoons. Sometimes it was a word, a sound, a smell or a particular assignment at school that would topple him.

So, having tried so hard for so long with very little improvement, she asked to try a very small dose of Ritalin just to prove to herself she had been taking the right path all along. Let me tell you that was a very heart wrenching decision for her to make.
She tried it at home after school was out for the summer so that the school didn't have to deal with any repercussions it might cause. She thought she saw a difference right away, but was so convinced it wasn't the right path, that she didn't put any faith in it. She put it away for a couple of months until right before school was to start again.

As he was going into 7th grade the school called to set up a meeting to discuss him attending the next year since they had concerns about how he would handle having to change classes. They had been right alongside her in doing everything they could to help, mainly because she herself was so committed to him and she'd gone above and beyond what most parents do or would have done.

She and her husband both went and although I can't remember the exact words she told me later, but it was the math teacher who made a difference. The math teacher was the best bet to handle her son when he got out of control. He loved math, was a near genius in math, and the teacher just seemed to have a gift in talking her son down.

Anyway, he said something like, if you know you are diabetic do you refuse to take insulin because it's a drug? If you know you have epilepsy do you refuse to take something like diazepam because it's a drug?
Why would you refuse your son something that might make his life so much better, just because it is a drug? Whatever it was he said, she took to heart because she had not considered ADHD meds to be as life saving drugs. What if she was wrong?

She went back to the doctors and did a better study of Ritalin and after learning that it only stays in the system for 4-6 hours and would have no lasting effect if she decided to stop it she decided to actively try it.

She agreed to try it for a week before school started but not tell anyone. It was so very apparent he was engaged in a different way that many of us, who didn't know he was taking it, commented. I even complimented her or such a success she had found during the summer.

It wasn't until about a month after school started that she told anyone other than his teachers. It was simply one of the most amazing things I have ever encountered.

He graduated high school in 2006 with honors and while still taking Ritalin, albeit with dosage changes as he got older and grew more.

So, yeah, she literally tried everything possible.....
It's likely that the child needed more of the approach taken by the math teacher. A lot of very well-meaning people simply aren't very good at helping cases like this. For instance, I highly doubt food/diet had anything to do with the child's issues. (I love "Good Will Hunting" )

With all that said, sure, if a parent is THAT proactive in searching for answers outside of medication and still can't make progress, it's A LOT more justifable and understandable that they would give Ritalin a chance. Sadly, a great number of parents don't even do 1/1000 the stuff
that parent did.
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