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Old 03-17-2010, 05:51 AM
 
48 posts, read 169,746 times
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Default IEP versus 504 Plan for a child with ADHD

My daughter was diagnosed with ADHD at age 6. She is doing well on medication and performs pretty well in school. Her math skills are outstanding, but reading has always been a challenge. She is currently has a DRA score of 20 and is in second grade. The schools end of year benchmark is 28. Her reading has improved steadily.

Colgate and other tests were given to all second graders and she scored in the 98th percentile in all but one area (nonverbal I think). Her score in that area was in 79th percentile. These scores are in sharp contrast to how the school perceives her ability, based largely on her difficulty reading. Several of her classmates read at the fourth grade level which adds to the contrast in her performance.

The school has recommended an IEP or 504 plan. The diagnosing physician recommended a 504 plan. I imagine that additional screening will be necessary.

My question is how do IEPs and 504 plans affect her eligibility to enter a university program. Are high school diplomas considered "special education diplomas"? I don't want to limit her options because I believe she can succeed in a state university program.

Last edited by Southern_Transplant; 03-17-2010 at 06:56 AM..
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Old 03-17-2010, 06:19 AM
 
Location: Eastern time zone
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Children with IEPs and 504s are not automatically awarded "special" diplomas (here those're called Certificates of Completion). CoC's are for children who cannot master the regular curriculum and need it to be modified-- IOW, kids who are severely cognitively disabled. Most kids with IEPs and 504s are perfectly capable of mastering the standard curriculum (and some are also gifted). They just need accommodations-- like OT for small motor problems, or Speech therapy, or classroom mods like sitting close to the board or being allowed to take state tests in a small group where they won't become distracted (or distract others).
Modifications equal changing the curriculum equal CoC.
Accommodations equal making the curriculum more accessible equal a regular or honors diploma, depending on which classes are taken.
Universities and colleges have Offices of Disability with which a student can register to get similar/appropriate accommodations made in their classes. There needs to be documentation of the disability, of course, you can't just walk in and say "Hi! I'm autistic!" or something-- but the mechanism is there. Some schools are probably better accessible than others, so it's something to consider, but it's not a deal-breaker.
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Old 03-17-2010, 08:00 AM
 
Location: Boerne area
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SpEd and 504 do not have to be life long, they are reevaluated periodically to see if they still are in need of assistance. Get her the assistance now and she might very well learn to compensate for her disability by MS or HS and not need a special plan any more.
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Old 03-17-2010, 08:34 AM
 
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Thanks for your responses. I anticipated and welcomed a 504 plan for her but I was surprised when the school seemed to be leaning towards an IEP.

I suspect additional screening will show that she has dyslexia or a similar diagnosis. She still reverses d's and b's and I have read that some studies link ADHD to dyslexia.

From your replies, it seems that colleges and universities do not lower an applicant's status (chances of getting accepted) among other applicants if they graduate from high school under an IEP or 504 plan.
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Old 03-17-2010, 09:34 AM
 
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Suggestion: Work with your child and help her learn to concentrate and read better. Washing your hands of it and putting your daughter in the hands of a government agency like a SPED program is a BAD idea. ADHD is NOT a disability. It's merely a hurdle your daughter needs to learn to clear on her own free of medication or involvment in governent programs. The long-term ramifications-even if only pyschological-of putting your daughter in a program for the disabled can be significant. Helping her to overcome the challenge indpendent of medication and/or government programs is by far and away the correct plan of action.
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Old 03-17-2010, 09:46 AM
 
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and here we go....
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Old 03-17-2010, 09:57 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skyway31 View Post
Suggestion: Work with your child and help her learn to concentrate and read better. Washing your hands of it and putting your daughter in the hands of a government agency like a SPED program is a BAD idea. ADHD is NOT a disability. It's merely a hurdle your daughter needs to learn to clear on her own free of medication or involvment in governent programs. The long-term ramifications-even if only pyschological-of putting your daughter in a program for the disabled can be significant. Helping her to overcome the challenge indpendent of medication and/or government programs is by far and away the correct plan of action.
Bias-free and non-judgemental replies are welcome. You prove part of what is said about assumptions. It's not appropriate to assume or imply that I "washed my hands of it" or that I do not work with her. Clearly, this is a "hot-button" issue for you. I'm not interested in a debate about ADHD and will not participate in one with you. Kindly resist the urge to vent.
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Old 03-17-2010, 10:10 AM
 
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What I have noticed is that often for any sort of accommodation to be made, there needs to be something like a 504 or IEP. This frees up the teachers to do things like have an aide help your child catch up on her writing, or let her stand at her desk to do her work when she is fidgety, or move your child to the front next to the teacher's desk so they can keep an eye on her better. It basically formalizes what a good teacher and support staff would do anyway, and protects everyone from someone screaming "preferential treatment" and making a stink. It also allows you to give input to the teachers and support staff on things that work and don't work in regard to your particular child.

Like the others said, it will help her now to learn how to learn despite her differences and good work on that now can help nip any later problems in the bud and may eliminate the need for formal (and I say formal b/c she will probably always need a system to help her stay organized) accommodations in the later school years.

Good luck!
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Old 03-17-2010, 10:11 AM
 
3,425 posts, read 6,219,918 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aconite View Post
you can't just walk in and say "Hi! I'm autistic!" or something--
LOL - that would be a "fail!"
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Old 03-17-2010, 11:06 AM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
867 posts, read 1,834,881 times
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B and D reversals are still fairly common in second grade, at least through the first half of the year or so... still see it in a few students through the end of the year. Is she showing any other signs of dyslexia? Testing for dyslexia is not a bad thing, but I just wanted to let you know that this is still something with see with many of our 2nd graders and it is not always an indicator of dyslexia.

If the school is pushing for IEP over 504, I would ask them to lay out for you the pros and cons of each one and explain why they are pushing for one over the other. They may have a valid reason for it that they haven't explained, but they should be able to back it up with a rationale of some type.

As others have said, an IEP or 504 for ADHD shouldn't affect the type of high school diploma she earns.
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