U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Do specialized high schools prepare students for top-tier colleges as well as private (prep) schools
Yes 10 71.43%
No 4 28.57%
Voters: 14. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-23-2010, 07:16 AM
 
Location: NYC
2,296 posts, read 4,650,504 times
Reputation: 1084

Advertisements

PLEASE VOTE USING THE BUTTONS: In your opinion, do specialized high schools prepare students for top-tier colleges as well as private or prep schools?




[There are nine specialized high schools in NYC. They are public schools and they are FREE. Admission to all (except Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School of Music & Art and Performing Arts -- based on audition) is based on the Specialized High School Admissions Test (SHSAT).]

Last edited by queensgrl; 03-23-2010 at 08:07 AM.. Reason: missing instructions
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-23-2010, 12:18 PM
hsw
 
2,144 posts, read 6,338,208 times
Reputation: 1516
"Prepare" is a vague term

Many kids at private schools like Dalton or Spence or HoraceMann...or public schools like PaloAlto are from families where parents are Stanford or Harvard alums, so have advantages of DNA, family values, legacy preference in admissions, family donations to colleges, etc etc

Bronx School of Science, etc had many notable alums ~50+yrs ago but not many in more recent decades

For past ~40yrs, many immigrant families that value education and upward mobility have lived in various then-newer, middle-income suburbs like Cupertino or Naperville (which are now older suburbs that many have migrated away from), not in old cities in ethnic enclaves, so many of the old specialized public schools...and the old NewEngland boarding schools...have shriveled in relevance at elite colleges or in elite, lucrative industries which hire from most elite colleges

Also need to consider that major schism exists between legal immigrants who came to US for grad school in engineering (see lots of them in suburban SiliconValley) and immigrants who may have arrived illegally, with no education and little demonstrated upward mobility (often seen residing in many ancient cities like NYC or SF)....their kids are often quite different creatures, as are their schools
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-23-2010, 02:23 PM
 
Location: NYC
2,296 posts, read 4,650,504 times
Reputation: 1084
Coming from a family of two Specialized HS grads that went on to MIT and Wellesley, I am biased, so I am throwing out the question to others. Please share your thoughts!!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-23-2010, 06:49 PM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,393 posts, read 30,653,656 times
Reputation: 14582
This has more to do with peers than the school. Specialized high schools attract better students so they can do more with their students.

Sadly, it is the bottom half of my class that determines how fast we go and what topics I go into depth on.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-23-2010, 09:38 PM
 
Location: Maryland not Murlin
8,192 posts, read 22,279,482 times
Reputation: 6153
Not sure what you mean by 'specialized' since all of the specialized high schools that I know of are not engaged solely in college prep. I am speaking of specialized high schools for students of GLBT to 'art' high schools to remedial schools and everything in-between.

Now, if you are talking about prep schools, then yes, they do prepare students for top-tier colleges. Well, at least they say that they do. My high school is a public prep school with a focus on medical/science. However, when I graduated from high school, many of the top students went into the Navy or Air Force to study nursing or computers or what-have-you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-24-2010, 04:36 AM
 
784 posts, read 2,513,387 times
Reputation: 446
Agree with hsw, 'prepare' is very vague.

But if you mean admittance, then no:

WSJ.com

I'm sure they can handle the workload though.

Last edited by NYCAnalyst; 03-24-2010 at 04:46 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-24-2010, 12:16 PM
 
Location: NYC
2,296 posts, read 4,650,504 times
Reputation: 1084
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYCAnalyst View Post
Agree with hsw, 'prepare' is very vague.

But if you mean admittance, then no:

WSJ.com

I'm sure they can handle the workload though.
Great link. Thanks. However take a closer look -- it isn't measuring admittance, it is measuring attendance. I am sure that financial barriers prevent some specialized high school students from entering top tier colleges, which could be skewing the numbers in favor of the private/prep schools.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-24-2010, 04:40 PM
 
784 posts, read 2,513,387 times
Reputation: 446
Quote:
Originally Posted by queensgrl View Post
Great link. Thanks. However take a closer look -- it isn't measuring admittance, it is measuring attendance. I am sure that financial barriers prevent some specialized high school students from entering top tier colleges, which could be skewing the numbers in favor of the private/prep schools.
Due to massive endowments, all of the top tier colleges meet 100% of demonstrated financial aid (from the FAFSA) for low and middle income students. For example, Harvard is free if the student's parents make under $60 / year. If they make between $100K - $180K / year, they only have to pay 10% of their income towards the cost of education.

Let's not forget that many of the prep schools offer financial aid as well. For example, professional athlete Pedro Alvarez grew up in a low-income neighborhood of NYC and attended Horace Mann. His dad is a cab driver and he shares a bedroom with his mother - not exactly your stereotypical prep school kid.

Your next link (a bit old but you get the idea):

http://www.auap.com/prepschoolclass.html (broken link)

Last edited by NYCAnalyst; 03-24-2010 at 04:48 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:50 AM.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top