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Old 04-11-2011, 04:02 PM
 
Location: Glory Road - El Paso, Texas (R.O)
2,478 posts, read 3,329,127 times
Reputation: 1567

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Call Canters, like fast food chains, can pay pretty well once you get into management.
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Old 04-20-2011, 04:33 PM
 
2,014 posts, read 1,928,592 times
Reputation: 828
Quote:
Originally Posted by paleo99 View Post
El Paso is growing only because of it's proximity to the border and the cartel wars going on over there. If you exclude the border relocations going on in Ft. Bliss, you find that the net number of ordinary working native El Pasoans has actually declined. This is particularly true of middle class hispanics and anglos... the latter has been decreasing for 20 years now and are now almost entirely retirees at this point.
Well of course "native El Pasoans" aren't going to see a massive growth spurt, unless they all have 10 children within the next year. How do you think cities like Phoenix, Dallas, Houston and Austin saw such impressive growth last decade? From pulling people from the East and West Coast, certainly not by multiplying their "native populations.

It's the same reason the U.S. has done so well. Our birth rate isn't very high, but we have high levels of immigration which acts as an economic catalyst.
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Old 08-03-2011, 05:39 PM
 
Location: Conway, AR
33 posts, read 75,182 times
Reputation: 38
The national demographics are such that the segment of the population at or approaching retirement age is bigger everywhere, not just the Desert Southwest. It's inescapable, even in college towns all over the country. El Paso strikes me as having something of an advantage, so long as it continues to keep the crime in Cd. Juárez from spilling over. Given the messed up U.S. health care economy, some retirees might find it advantageous to have access to doctors across the border (despite the crime). Regarding the call centers discussion, the bilingual population of El Paso works to its advantage in that regard. I'm guessing there's a bright future for El Paso. If the EPA continues to fund brownfield redevelopment, it will be possible for loft development in the downtown area to expand.
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Old 08-04-2011, 07:11 AM
 
Location: Miami
888 posts, read 91,591 times
Reputation: 658
Quote:
Originally Posted by Laredo2007 View Post
The national demographics are such that the segment of the population at or approaching retirement age is bigger everywhere, not just the Desert Southwest. It's inescapable, even in college towns all over the country. El Paso strikes me as having something of an advantage, so long as it continues to keep the crime in Cd. Juárez from spilling over. Given the messed up U.S. health care economy, some retirees might find it advantageous to have access to doctors across the border (despite the crime). Regarding the call centers discussion, the bilingual population of El Paso works to its advantage in that regard. I'm guessing there's a bright future for El Paso. If the EPA continues to fund brownfield redevelopment, it will be possible for loft development in the downtown area to expand.
Good points about the health care.
The thread still does not answer the question about why the city is growing so much. Nobody has definitively said exactly what types of jobs are being created to draw in the population, nobody has said from where the population is being pulled (just saying they come from across the border is not real analysis). So far, nobody has put up any real figures regarding the origin and reasons for growth - they just say it is happening.
What % is coming from Mexico, what % from the US, what % from Canada, etc. Is it just the question of well-off people who already have businesses in Juárez moving over? Again, nobody has really accounted for the growth on this thread.

Furthermore, would you not agree that bigger is not always better? There are people on these forums that probably are still in their twenties, extolling the virtues of having a ¨big league¨ city in West Texas, as if they have to overcompensate for some kind of lacking in their life. More growth brings more chicks and more chicks bring better sexual opportunities, etc. That gets them all excited. Or maybe they think they´ll be richer. But with the water supplies/drought situations, the sprawl and increased energy costs, all of these and more are negative consequences of ¨growth¨. And yet 2-3 people on this thread are saying ¨yeah dude, let´s be bigger man, big league, congrats, Texas is more than DFW and Austin man, El Paso needs to get bigger to compete, yeah man.¨

As a GenXer, when I was in my twenties, I was also in that phase of being enamored of growth, to get bigger bigger, yeah, but I´m older now and I realize that it is not always optimal. It´s 2011, I thought the US was past its ¨bigger is better¨ mentality, I guess judging by all of the c & d cups walking around Dade County (where I live), I suppose we have not learned a thing. I´m sure with growth in EP will be larger government and higher taxes and strained services
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Old 08-07-2011, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Conway, AR
33 posts, read 75,182 times
Reputation: 38
Yeah, I think growing pains are a concern, especially when it comes to water. Just look at Vegas. On the other hand, growth can be positive in that it can stimulate a "multiplier effect" of sorts in the economy, enable a city to count on a wider array of economic activities, and maybe even reach a size that would sustain beneficial projects like light rail. Places that are too small (e.g., Pecos, TX and other micropolitan areas) more often than not fail to be economically sustainable and ultimately lose populations. Places that are too big become chaotic (Phoenix). It's a matter of finding that "right size" that enables college graduates to want to stick around and be part of making the place, but not so big that there are water or air quality problems on the order of LA, Vegas, or Phoenix.
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Old 08-08-2011, 01:34 AM
 
47,586 posts, read 35,516,431 times
Reputation: 21580
Quote:
Originally Posted by kidicarus89 View Post
Well of course "native El Pasoans" aren't going to see a massive growth spurt, unless they all have 10 children within the next year. How do you think cities like Phoenix, Dallas, Houston and Austin saw such impressive growth last decade? From pulling people from the East and West Coast, certainly not by multiplying their "native populations.

It's the same reason the U.S. has done so well. Our birth rate isn't very high, but we have high levels of immigration which acts as an economic catalyst.
I don't think the USA is really doing all that well. We'll see what our lowered credit rating brings.

If cuts in spending ever get made, I think El Paso could feel some thing. We were spared the last recession thanks to lots of federal money pouring in, we might not be so lucky again.
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Old 08-08-2011, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Home, Home on the Front Range
14,135 posts, read 7,218,300 times
Reputation: 6068
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wynwood View Post
Good points about the health care.
The thread still does not answer the question about why the city is growing so much. Nobody has definitively said exactly what types of jobs are being created to draw in the population, nobody has said from where the population is being pulled (just saying they come from across the border is not real analysis). So far, nobody has put up any real figures regarding the origin and reasons for growth - they just say it is happening.
Very simple, really: a lot of it has to do with BRAC.

"Based upon the recommendations of the 2005 Base Closure and Realignment Commission (BRAC) and other Army decisions, the Department of Defense (DoD) will relocate soldiers and their families from installations around the world to Fort Bliss, effectively raising the military population of the installation to over 90,000 men, women and children by the year 2013.
...
The El Paso-Dońa Ana County region, with a 2005 population of about 902,200, is projected to grow by 144,300 persons by 2025 if no further changes take place at Fort Bliss. Even with no more gains at Fort Bliss and WSMR, the impact of new troops arriving between 2005 and 2008 will increase this estimate to about 169,000 new residents by 2025. In addition, Fort Bliss anticipates further expansion with the arrival of up to 48,000 soldiers and family members over the next five years."


EL PASO - Regional Growth Management Plan

As the military presence continues to grow, so too all of the civilian support services, housing, medical facilities, etc. needed to support them.

"El Paso's economy is projected to not only perform better in 2011 than last year, but to grow at the same rate, or even better than, the national economy. That's according to the University of Texas at El Paso’s (UTEP) latest Borderplex economic forecast.
The city's economy is expected to grow to $23.4 billion in 2011, with military employment leading the way."

El Paso Housing And Economy Bright Spots In Southwest
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Old 08-09-2011, 02:41 AM
 
Location: Green Valley, AZ
351 posts, read 428,865 times
Reputation: 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by DANNYY View Post
El Paso so far has one of the best performances that only three other places can match so far, Washington DC, Oklahoma City, & Indianapolis. Almost every places so far has either been with where the estimates and projections left it off for last year or been much less.

El Paso however has been way more than its projections and estimates implied. It's 35,000 larger than even the estimates!

El Paso MSA 2009 (Estimates): 751,296
El Paso MSA 2010 (Estimates): 765,546
El Paso MSA 2010 (Official Count): 800,647

Difference Between Estimates & Official: + 35,101

Congratulations El Paso on a job well done!
Not sure what the congrats are for...

Congrats on more congestion?
Congrats on more pollution?
Congrats on more crime?
Congrats on more urban sprawl?
Congrats on more crowded schools?

A bigger population isn't always better.
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Old 05-17-2013, 01:15 AM
 
44 posts, read 49,877 times
Reputation: 83
El Paso is a great place to live due to a lower cost of living and excellent weather that keeps utility costs lower. The negative part of this city is the never ending tax increases that the mayor and city council keep hitting the home owners with at every opportunity. When it comes to out of town corporations planning to set up shop in El Paso the mayor and all his council jump through hoops to make sure they give these big money people every tax incentive they want. One thing that will bankrupt this city will be El Paso paying to keep the Texas Tech Medical Center in operation. This hospital started 30+ years past as a non profit county hospital for the indigent from El Paso,.This has blossomed into this monster that will take billions to stay open to treat anyone as long as they claim to be a poor Hispanic from our country or Mexico are never denied treatment. The new Ball park is another mistake due to the big time money promoters being able to sway the City manger and Mayor to follow their game plans to the letter. The Central appraisal District is now following suit and catering to the owners of Western Refinery/Foster/Hunt Group by reducing the last valuation of their property.I deem my home property is too high but my opinion means not a thing since I cant operate or promise anything to these wheeler dealers.All the new grad medicals students will be graduating from our Great Texas Tech Medical school but like most are doing after graduating they will leave El Paso for far better wages and higher positions to start at. Most taxing entities give a tax exemption for seniors over 65 tears of age. Why Texas Tech UMC not required to give people over 65 an exemption for their their tax bracket as the others do?
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Old 05-18-2013, 01:45 AM
 
Location: El Paso, TX
768 posts, read 1,949,278 times
Reputation: 751
Whats up with all the naysayers on here as of late?
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