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Old 09-10-2012, 11:03 PM
 
46 posts, read 46,211 times
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Default El Paso Urban Legends

Do you guys know any urban legends of El Paso or got info on them. Not just haunted or scary stories but other legends of the city. For example I hear there is a waterfall somewhere in the Frankling Mountains. I firts heard it from a Park ranger. He says there has always been people saying there is waterfall in a cave in the mountains, others say is way up high. The Ranger says it is very possible for one to exist hidden in a cave, because there must be a water source that we dont know of that can keep all the deer running around there alive. He says deer need a lot of water, and cant get that water just from plants, there has to be a water source that keeps them alive. There is also another legend that says there is a gold mine, I think UTEP did some research and found it, a gold mine did exist but they dont know where it is . My grandpa says there is gold in the mountains but he says it is guarded by the ghosts of jumano indians He says the only way to get the gold is to have indian blood in you, my grandpa is tarahumara indian, so i'll be looking Anyways any other urban legends from the area? Scary legends and scary stories are welcomed but there is already a thread for that but I dont mind them
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Old 09-10-2012, 11:54 PM
 
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when we have a healthy monsoon, there are a few springs that pop up in the mountains. Last year, I found one with the tiniest trickle of water running down some rocks/plants.

If someone has found gold....they aren't going to tell anyone about it...those are finds that you keep to yourself as long as possible.
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Old 09-11-2012, 12:04 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SA2EP? View Post
when we have a healthy monsoon, there are a few springs that pop up in the mountains. Last year, I found one with the tiniest trickle of water running down some rocks/plants.

If someone has found gold....they aren't going to tell anyone about it...those are finds that you keep to yourself as long as possible.
I know there is small streams out there in the mountains but some people say there is a waterfall hidden inside a cave. Just wanted to know if any one had info on that. There is research that shows that there is a gold mine in El Paso, but no one knows where it is at.
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Old 09-11-2012, 12:08 AM
 
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the caves would definitely be interesting to visit. I took a friend from out of town up to the rest stop area off transmountain where you can begin your hike...it was 1 a.m. and not a car around. I had told him about the traveling monk.

No cars plus pitch black up there is hair raising. the tricks your mind will play on your is wild...no monk though...not that time.
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Old 09-11-2012, 07:18 AM
 
Location: Sacramento Mtns of NM
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It's sometimes difficult to separate fact from fiction when it comes to local lore. Speaking from personal experience, I know of two locations high on the mountain where springs once flowed year around. It is a puzzle to me how those springs kept flowing when they are located so high on the mountain - especially during the drier months.

Cottonwood Springs is located on the west side in a canyon above the picnic area of Tom Mays Park. Once upon a time there were mature live cottonwoods in the canyon, kept alive by the flow from the spring.

Indian Springs is even higher in elevation on the east side above Trans Mountain Rd. There was once heavy vegetation at the spring, but not cottonwoods, that I recall. Scrub oak, hackberry etc.

As for mining, there are a number (or were - some may have been filled for safety reasons) of what I'd refer to as exploratory holes on both the Franklins and on Crazy Cat mountain. The only productive mine was a "tin mine" on the east side where there was also a cistern or well that had water in the bottom, and probably a windmill when the mine was active. One online source says this tin mine is the ONLY tin ever commercially produced in the USA.

Legend has it that on a certain day of the year, at a certain hour, if a person stands in the bell tower of the cathedral in Juarez, one can see the entrance to the Lost Padre Mine in the Franklins - implying it is somewhere in the vicinity of Scenic Drive.

Here is part of the article on the Franklins on the Texas Historical Society web site:

Quote:
The name Franklin may have been derived from that of Franklin, Texas, in El Paso County, which in turn was named for Benjamin Franklin Coons (see EL PASO, TEXAS). Other sources suggest that the profile of Benjamin Franklin can be seen in some of the rocky crests. Early Spanish maps referred to the range as Las Sierras de los Mansos (an Indian tribe the Spanish found along the river at El Paso) or Las Sierras de los Organos (for the organ-pipe shapes of some of the cliffs). Early Spanish and Mexican settlers usually avoided the mountains because Apache and Comanche raiders used them as bases for their raids upon the river settlements.


Outlaws also used the rugged isolation of the Franklins. At Fussellman Canyon, in an encounter with rustlers in 1890, deputy United States marshall Charles H. Fussellman was killed in a shootout. The outlaw Gerónimo Parra was later hanged for the shooting.


Small quantities of tin were produced in the Franklin mountains in the early 1900s. A mine founded in 1909 and operated by the El Paso Tin Mining and Smelting Company, proved unsuccessful; work was stopped in 1915 after the project yielded only 160 100-pound pigs of tin (see TIN SMELTING). The legendary Lost Padre Mine is said to be hidden somewhere in the mountains. The tale says that some 300 burro loads of silver were left by Jesuits, who filled in the shaft before fleeing the area. Other versions state that 5,000 silver bars, 4,336 gold ingots, nine burro loads of jewels, and four priceless Aztec codices were hidden in the shaft by Juan de Oñate. Local newspapers periodically report someone's claiming to have found the fabled treasure, only to lose it again or run out of capital before it can be recovered.

Last edited by joqua; 09-11-2012 at 07:29 AM..
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Old 09-11-2012, 06:41 PM
 
46 posts, read 46,211 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SA2EP? View Post
the caves would definitely be interesting to visit. I took a friend from out of town up to the rest stop area off transmountain where you can begin your hike...it was 1 a.m. and not a car around. I had told him about the traveling monk.

No cars plus pitch black up there is hair raising. the tricks your mind will play on your is wild...no monk though...not that time.
I have never went hiking that late. But it sounds like an awesome thing to do. That is when all the animals are out too. I'll go looking for that monk some time this weekend too
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Old 09-11-2012, 06:44 PM
 
46 posts, read 46,211 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joqua View Post
It's sometimes difficult to separate fact from fiction when it comes to local lore. Speaking from personal experience, I know of two locations high on the mountain where springs once flowed year around. It is a puzzle to me how those springs kept flowing when they are located so high on the mountain - especially during the drier months.

Cottonwood Springs is located on the west side in a canyon above the picnic area of Tom Mays Park. Once upon a time there were mature live cottonwoods in the canyon, kept alive by the flow from the spring.

Indian Springs is even higher in elevation on the east side above Trans Mountain Rd. There was once heavy vegetation at the spring, but not cottonwoods, that I recall. Scrub oak, hackberry etc.

As for mining, there are a number (or were - some may have been filled for safety reasons) of what I'd refer to as exploratory holes on both the Franklins and on Crazy Cat mountain. The only productive mine was a "tin mine" on the east side where there was also a cistern or well that had water in the bottom, and probably a windmill when the mine was active. One online source says this tin mine is the ONLY tin ever commercially produced in the USA.

Legend has it that on a certain day of the year, at a certain hour, if a person stands in the bell tower of the cathedral in Juarez, one can see the entrance to the Lost Padre Mine in the Franklins - implying it is somewhere in the vicinity of Scenic Drive.

Here is part of the article on the Franklins on the Texas Historical Society web site:

El Paso native here and seriously never heard about springs up in the mountains. Do you have any pictures? As for the mines and gold info thanks alot. I been trying to get more info on that.
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Old 09-12-2012, 08:12 AM
 
Location: Sacramento Mtns of NM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicano915 View Post
El Paso native here and seriously never heard about springs up in the mountains. Do you have any pictures?
Well, which is it? In an earlier post to this thread you said:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicano915 View Post
I know there is small streams out there in the mountains but some people say there is a waterfall hidden inside a cave.
It's not hard to find photos of both Cottonwood and Indian springs on the internet using GOOGLE IMAGES. Here is one such photo of Cottonwood Springs - not dated so may not be recent:


As for Indian Springs, it is located on the east side near the summit of Indian Peak as shown on the map here:

Here is an excellent web page for further information on the Franklin Mountain range:

http://www.summitpost.org/franklin-mountains/472740

For anyone with further interest in this thread, there is a ton of information and personal photos on the internet for anyone willing to spend the time searching.

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Old 09-12-2012, 08:34 AM
 
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Great info, Joqua. Thanks for sharing!
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Old 09-12-2012, 03:16 PM
 
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I hiked up to Indian Springs a few times as a teenager in the Seventies and Eighties. There was a depression surrounded by trees with rocks on the bottom near the top of Indian Springs Canyon (the canyon whose mouth is just west of the El Paso Museum of Archeology), where the spring was, and a dry stream bed going east down the canyon from it. I don't remember the spring being anything but dry; maybe it ran dry from all the city water wells pumping water out for drinking and so forth.
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