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Old 07-14-2009, 12:23 PM
 
Location: Northeast
43 posts, read 280,174 times
Reputation: 53

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We converted in 2006. 1825 square feet single level. They put on a rooftop package unit, 5 ton Ruud. Cost was about $6200 less a $300 rebate from EPWU. It was worth every penny and then some. Conversion was done by Grey Air Conditioning.

As I type this, it is 72 degrees inside my house. My electric bill averages about $175. EPE will put you on a different rate if you convert as well.

I just couldn't take another year of a swamp cooler. It's getting more and more humid in El Paso every year, and once the humidity is up, they don't make it cooler, they just make it wetter. No thanks.

I reiterate....refrigerated air is the best money we've ever spent on the house. No pumps, no pads, no water scale on the roof, no putting it in service in spring and out in the fall....no climbing on the roof...etc. And...in the spring or fall if you get a hot or cold snap, move the switch over and switch at will from heat to A/C.

Thank you Dr. Boyle
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Old 07-15-2009, 11:44 AM
 
Location: el paso texas
2,625 posts, read 10,051,215 times
Reputation: 1848
Now...... Chicos kickin out those 2 lovebirds!
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Old 07-21-2009, 10:58 AM
 
2,725 posts, read 3,691,600 times
Reputation: 2906
I am a 3rd generation El Pasoan. I learned to prepare swamp coolers from my father just like he did from my grandfather. We switched to A/C about 7 years ago from 2 Mastercools. Granted, the EPEC is higher but the water bill is a bit less and we are much more comfortable. IMHO, the swamp coolers don't cut it after the monsoons start. We don't run it until we get warm, just like we would do with the swamp coolers. Also, my pianos stay better intune with the A/C. The humidity level is more stable.
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Old 07-22-2009, 11:17 AM
 
Location: London, United Kingdom
84 posts, read 286,284 times
Reputation: 46
Quote:
I just couldn't take another year of a swamp cooler. It's getting more and more humid in El Paso every year, and once the humidity is up, they don't make it cooler, they just make it wetter. No thanks.
Just out of curiosity, is it really getting more humid in EP? Also, do you know where one can find any historical humidity records (i.e. over several years rather just for the past thirty days).
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Old 07-23-2009, 11:58 PM
 
Location: Northeast
43 posts, read 280,174 times
Reputation: 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by john gunn View Post
Just out of curiosity, is it really getting more humid in EP? Also, do you know where one can find any historical humidity records (i.e. over several years rather just for the past thirty days).
I don't have any verifiable data, but the trusty old "Sweat-o-meter" tells me it is. Then again, maybe I'm just getting older and less tolerant of heat/humidity mix.

Whether or not we're really getting more humid as years pass, it certainly feels that way. And refrigerated air makes that feeling go away. I've never had one ounce of buyer's remorse from doing the conversion.

I would be interested to see some real data if anyone knows where to dig it up.
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Old 07-25-2009, 08:52 PM
 
47,576 posts, read 58,711,508 times
Reputation: 22158
Quote:
Originally Posted by john gunn View Post
Just out of curiosity, is it really getting more humid in EP? Also, do you know where one can find any historical humidity records (i.e. over several years rather just for the past thirty days).
I don't think it is - before El Paso became so large, there were the same summer monsoons and more fields under irrigation. There may be more people watering yards and having swimming pools but if anything, I think it's not more humid but more concrete that radiates the heat and less dirt and grass that absorb the heat.
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Old 08-04-2009, 02:57 PM
 
Location: El Paso, Texas
21 posts, read 66,937 times
Reputation: 30
Default Consider the Cost and Investment

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rezdawg View Post
I live in New Mexico and am wanting to convert to refrigerated a/c from a swamp cooler. I have been trying to find out how much it should cost and what all is involved. I have gotten several estimates of around $5,500 for the unit as well as the install (and removal of the swamp cooler). This just seems quite high. What is involved that would make it cost so much?
Thanks!
You can get plenty of estimates, but they should be within $500 of each other for the same job. Depending on your house configuartion, the choices are either a rooftop unit that sits where your swampbox is now, or a split-system, which is much better. The rooftop unit is now as efficient for a lot of reasons. The split system eliminates all equipment on your roof. Instead, you get a new furnace with an "A" coil section that provides the cooling. The compressor, condenser and condenser fan are all located outside on the ground. Piping is routed into the house through the attic and drops down into the heater closet to connect in and out of the "A" coil, which is your evaporator. The ventilation fan for the heater is what circulates air in your home. You use a heat/cool thermostat preferably with programmabe setback settings to save you money in either mode. In the heating mode, your new high-effficency gas fired furnace does the heating of your home just like the old one, only better. All the air is filtered and recirculated in either mode, and you never have to get on the roof to do anything again. The increase in comfort is substantial, and once installed, you will wonder why you waited so long to do it. When you convert, you are paying about 80% for the equipment (outside = compressor/condenser/fan; inside: new furnace with "A"coil, thermostat, 220V electrical connection if not present) and 20% for the removal of you old swampbox, roof repair and removal of the old furnace plus installation labor. It is a fair amount of work, but it is worth it.

I have a 2600 sq. ft. two-story in El Paso, and have installed two 3 ton Rheem units (dual split systems) with two separate thermostats. I also have two new furnaces on the thermostats. The total conversion cost me $4600.00 last year. The systems run independantly of each other only when needed. My electric bill went up about $40/mo., my water bill dropped $50/mo. and my gas bill dropped $30/mo in the winter time. You can estimate the system capacity by a simple rule of thumb: for every 500 sq. ft. of living area, you will need about 1 ton of cooling capacity. A 1500 sq. ft. house will need AT LEAST 3 tons, so you could go with a little larger unit (3.5 or 4 ton) and you will not be paying too much for the equipment or the utilities to heat/cool your home. Never go to small, or it will never shut off. Slightly oversizing the capacity will ensure you can always make your home comfortable no matter what the weather conditions happen to be. Anything that makes such a difference in the comfort and efficency of your home is well worth it in my opinion.

Last edited by Coolrunning; 08-04-2009 at 02:59 PM.. Reason: added price
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Old 08-04-2009, 03:25 PM
 
Location: Glory Road - El Paso, Texas (R.O)
2,613 posts, read 5,123,275 times
Reputation: 1835
Can you PM me or post the person that did your AC. My house is about the same size but only one story. I was thinking of doing something similar (two units).
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Old 08-04-2009, 04:12 PM
 
4,248 posts, read 10,231,071 times
Reputation: 3109
Also get it done in the winter time. Much less demand for A/C companies and should be alittle cheaper.

Also if you convert you get a tax credit.
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Old 08-10-2009, 08:14 AM
 
Location: Texas
32,537 posts, read 17,650,891 times
Reputation: 18662
Evaporative cooling works well in May and June. Once the humidity climbs a little (doesn't take much) in July, they stop keeping your place "comfortable." In August when the thunderstorms hit, they're not much good at all.

If you have a high tolerance for heat and don't mind humidity and the occasional mold problem associated with it, then evap cooling is your best bet.

I converted to refrigerated air five years ago and would never go back.
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