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Old 08-14-2009, 01:54 PM
 
10 posts, read 30,808 times
Reputation: 17

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Miner72 View Post
The biggest plus here in this region is refrigerated air takes out the humidity in the house, plus no more trips to the roof, a simple switch when the cold weather comes makes it so nice, no mold in the ducts and it helps in the resale of your property!
Refrigerated is the way to go. Invest in the upgrade. We have 2,400 sq ft home. Two 3 ton units, one for each floor. 2 programable thermostates. Our electric bill is $150 the highest in the summer. Also, what helps keep the monthly cost down are the double pane windows. If you don't have them, consider investing in those as well.
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Old 11-13-2009, 04:10 PM
 
Location: El Paso, Texas
21 posts, read 66,941 times
Reputation: 30
Dale is his name, and his cell number is 309-6824. He may be able to help you.
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Old 11-14-2009, 08:11 AM
 
Location: El Paso, Texas
21 posts, read 66,941 times
Reputation: 30
When you consider the fact that your home is your shelter, then comfort should be a priority. But maintenance is also an important consideration. Evaporative coolers are a crude and archaic method of cooling air in ari climates. The only reason they work at all is because when water evaporates to vapor it takes heat with it, producing a cooling effect. You can usually expect about a 20 degree drop in temperature at best from evaporative cooling, and in the process, you are raising the humidity inside your house to at least double what it may be outside! It may not be humid in El Paso, but it certainly is inside a house with a swamp cooler. The days os evaporative (swamp) coolers are over for me for a number of other reasons. A true air conditioning system is an integrated heating, ventilation and cooling system (HVAC) complete with thermostatic control and air filtration. It make a lot of sense to convert your existing evaporative cooling system to a split system, replacing both cooler and heater with high efficiency units. You can permanently remove the cooler(s) from your rooftop, by using an evaprator "A" coil in your new furnace duct, and circulating air with the furnace blower. It is temperature controlled by the heat/cool mode on your thermostat which may also be upgraded to a energy saving type with night setback setting and other programming designed to sace money while maintaining comfortable temperatures. You will be breathing cleaner air since all the air "conditioned" is filtered before it is distributed through your ventilation ductwork. I like to change the filter every three months, because they don't really get that dirty. It is recommended that you change the filter monthly. One thing I have noticed is the reduction in dust in the house. I didn't realize how much dust was drawn into the evaporative coolers and blown into my house, until I eliminated the Mastercools. This is of particular interest to those who have allergies or are prone to respiratory illnesses. Sure, it requires a bit of investment in your home. But it is probably one of the most effective home improvements you could do to make your home more comfortable, healthy, pleasant and energy efficent. The new furnaces are about half the size of the old ones and put out more heat for every cubic foot of natural gas burned in them. Go ahead and convert. You will never regret it. Below are some of the advantages of converting from evaporative cooling to a refrigerated A/C system:

1. Safety - no more climbing up on the roof.
2. Security - no more leaving windows cracked open 24 hours a day.
3. Health - no more dust, pollen or insects drawn into the home with the air.
4. Home Repair - no more water damage to roof, duct work, internal corrosion.
5. Energy Efficiency - increased voltage from 120V to 240V is more economical.
6. Comfort Control - humidity and temperature is constant and feels better.
7. Noise Level - the home is much quieter without air blasting from the registers.
8. Easy Maintenance - units are ground mounted; filters are easy access (no tools).
9. Curb Appeal - the big, ugly rust boxes are no longer sitting up on your roof.
10. Season Switching - flick a switch from COOL to HEAT and you are done.
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Old 11-14-2009, 06:33 PM
 
4,248 posts, read 10,233,448 times
Reputation: 3110
Paragraphs are ok to use. :P
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Old 07-27-2011, 10:43 AM
 
2 posts, read 4,700 times
Reputation: 16
Reviving this thread as a necro-post....
However, I would LOVE to find the prices that you guys found. I have been checking into the refrigerated air conversion in my 3000 sq ft, single floor home on the West Side.
Price?
TWENTY THOUSAND DOLLARS for 7 tons of cooling and a SEER 18 level system.!!!

The cheapest estimate was $19,000, the most expensive was $23,500. That is for two units, installation, and removal of the two swamp coolers. NO DUCT WORK or ELECTRICAL UPGRADING.

Honestly, I would love to do this conversion, but there is NO WAY I am going to get that investment back on my home should I decide to sell in the next few years. $20 grand...I was floored.

PA
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Old 07-27-2011, 06:18 PM
 
Location: Where I live.
9,191 posts, read 18,525,245 times
Reputation: 4766
That is for TWO units?

On two separate occasions, I was looking at properties in Alamogordo--and later, Farmington--homes I liked with existing central evap/swamp coolers.

The conversion prices I got for ONE unit ranged from $10-18K, depending on what they had to do. This has been within the last couple of years.

Nope. Conversion is not cheap, which is why I decided just to bide my time and find a house with refrigerated air, which I did, last May.

I hate swamp coolers (grew up with one in WT), so if I had not been able to find refrigerated in a house I could live with, I probably would have paid the conversion price.

Ouch.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ussfpa View Post
Reviving this thread as a necro-post....
However, I would LOVE to find the prices that you guys found. I have been checking into the refrigerated air conversion in my 3000 sq ft, single floor home on the West Side.
Price?
TWENTY THOUSAND DOLLARS for 7 tons of cooling and a SEER 18 level system.!!!

The cheapest estimate was $19,000, the most expensive was $23,500. That is for two units, installation, and removal of the two swamp coolers. NO DUCT WORK or ELECTRICAL UPGRADING.

Honestly, I would love to do this conversion, but there is NO WAY I am going to get that investment back on my home should I decide to sell in the next few years. $20 grand...I was floored.

PA
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Old 07-27-2011, 08:57 PM
 
Location: Glory Road - El Paso, Texas (R.O)
2,613 posts, read 5,124,096 times
Reputation: 1835
Wow! I would also need two units and a lot of duct work. I had thought all the new companies doing conversions would lower the going rate.
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Old 07-28-2011, 01:13 AM
ZSP
 
Location: El Paso TX
1,566 posts, read 3,975,844 times
Reputation: 2403
We converted to refrigerated air in mid April of this year. It was not cheap. Our home is small, 1650 SF...$8800 for one 4 ton unit, SEER 18 rating, split system and variable speed.

We had four estimates ranging from $8300 to $13500, all comparable equipment. The company we chose did an outstanding job in a timely manner and although the cost was an "ouch" to the bank account, we love it and don't regret it for a moment.

Our electric bill has only increased about $40-50 per month. Even though we may not stay in this home forever, I believe we will recoup our investment. Many home buyers today will not even look at a home if it doesn't have refrigerated air.
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Old 07-28-2011, 09:01 AM
 
643 posts, read 1,043,648 times
Reputation: 793
We converted in May. Since I have a family member who does conversions we were able to save quite a bit of money. I bought the unit directly from the supplier and saved the consumer mark-up. It is a 5 ton since my home is about 2500 sq. ft. I was able to get it all done for around $5k. It makes all the difference especialy on these humid days when the swamp coolers don't work too well.
We do not plan on moving anytime soon so return on investment was not in the equation.
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Old 07-30-2011, 12:20 PM
 
47,576 posts, read 58,722,338 times
Reputation: 22159
Quote:
Originally Posted by ussfpa View Post
Reviving this thread as a necro-post....
However, I would LOVE to find the prices that you guys found. I have been checking into the refrigerated air conversion in my 3000 sq ft, single floor home on the West Side.
Price?
TWENTY THOUSAND DOLLARS for 7 tons of cooling and a SEER 18 level system.!!!

The cheapest estimate was $19,000, the most expensive was $23,500. That is for two units, installation, and removal of the two swamp coolers. NO DUCT WORK or ELECTRICAL UPGRADING.

Honestly, I would love to do this conversion, but there is NO WAY I am going to get that investment back on my home should I decide to sell in the next few years. $20 grand...I was floored.

PA
That is a lot. I just got a new window fan for $14 and keeping windows and doors open is plenty cheap. My electric bill in June was $54.
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