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Old 07-02-2012, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Tennessee/Michigan
27,998 posts, read 46,415,349 times
Reputation: 19403

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At the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill in the fall of 2008, the spectacle of Barack Obama's presidential campaign dominated Meghan Gillilandís sophomore year. Going to the library, traversing the quad, or passing through a campus gathering place known as The Pit entailed running a gauntlet of clipboard-wielding Obama volunteers beseeching students to vote. A surge of enthusiasm among young voters would prove decisive in delivering North Carolina to Obama.

How Loss Of Enthusiasm Among Youth Voters Could Cost Obama The Presidency
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Old 07-02-2012, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,387 posts, read 79,618,227 times
Reputation: 38726
the youth was one of the two groups that carried him in 2008. They are not going to be as visable this time. I think they might be his downfall. I have said this for along time. The older a person, the more likely they are to vote, and the older voters are generally more conservative.
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Old 07-02-2012, 08:28 PM
 
Location: NC
10,005 posts, read 8,726,624 times
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I think it is kind of funny actually.

They are saying they are unenthusiastic about Obama because he promised to end the Iraq war, repeal Don't Ask Don't tell, and they believed he would come out in favor of equal marriage. Now they are disillusioned? Sadly I think they both play into the sterotypical young Obama voter who expected things to become magically better if only Obama was elected. Interestingly this was one of the main reasons I backed Hillary in the primary, and the focus of many of my 2008 primary discussions with college friends.
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Old 07-02-2012, 08:34 PM
 
12,639 posts, read 6,960,593 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Randomstudent View Post
I think it is kind of funny actually.

They are saying they are unenthusiastic about Obama because he promised to end the Iraq war, repeal Don't Ask Don't tell, and they believed he would come out in favor of equal marriage. Now they are disillusioned? Sadly I think they both play into the sterotypical young Obama voter who expected things to become magically better if only Obama was elected. Interestingly this was one of the main reasons I backed Hillary in the primary, and the focus of many of my 2008 primary discussions with college friends.
Actually the article says, correctly, that they are unenthused about Obama because Obama has FAILED to deliver on his promises with respect to the economy.

It's hard to get excited about your Messiah when you have $200K in student loans, can't find a job, and are living in your parents basement.

Youth with brains won't be so stupid as to vote for another 4 years of this joker.
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Old 07-03-2012, 01:51 PM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
19,388 posts, read 13,056,242 times
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Once a young person, or a person of any age, feels the empowerment of voting, they don't quit. Voting for the President of the United States is a lot deeper emotionally than voting for the Homecoming Queen or the Class President.

Obama put a lot of first time voters in the booths last time, and all one has to do is look at their own feelings to know what will happen this time.

How many of you regular voters never went back to vote again, ever, after voting for your first time?
How many of you who ever voted for an incumbent switched your vote to the other candidate the second time around?
How many of you whose first Presidential vote was for Reagan ever switched to a Democratic candidate afterward?
How many of you whose first Presidential candidate was Clinton switched to a Republican later?

Do you expect that the young are any different in this than you were when you were a young voter?

The motivations of the young vs. those of the old are different, but the beliefs that put the young in the voting booths in 2008 haven't changed much.

All of us who have voted before, often many times before, have mostly stuck with the beliefs that we favored the first time we showed up and punched in our choices.

Believing that the young are somehow totally different now is at best just wishful thinking. Like always, some will change sides, a few will sit this one out, but the most will vote the same way they did the first time they voted. We have all been disillusioned by some election or other at some time, but we don't generally quit voting completely if our side loses one, even when our side loses or wins by a landslide.

This election has every sign of being just as big as 2008. Do not think that those who emerged from the booths feeling victorious will suddenly change willy-nilly. Ron Paul may have captured some of the most disillusioned young voters, but he's not going to the a choice on the ballots.

Answer those questions above from your own personal history, and you will have the answer as to how the young, and all the other first-time voters of 2008, will do this year.
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Old 07-03-2012, 02:00 PM
 
69,372 posts, read 53,664,795 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Randomstudent View Post
repeal Don't Ask Don't tell,
Which he didnt do, a lawsuit repealed it
Quote:
Originally Posted by Randomstudent View Post
and they believed he would come out in favor of equal marriage
Which he didnt do either, he said states should decide.
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Old 07-03-2012, 02:14 PM
 
Location: On the "Left Coast", somewhere in "the Land of Fruits & Nuts"
8,367 posts, read 8,282,593 times
Reputation: 5906
Wait'll the Fall & see where they are, especially after they've had time to hang out with their friends. But right now it's summertime, and "politics" is unlikely to be on the mind of many "youth voters" at the moment.
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Old 07-03-2012, 02:51 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
11,831 posts, read 9,850,450 times
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It shouldn't have been difficult for Obama to distance himself from the policies and people connected with the worst President and administration in United States history; Especially when BO's entire campaign was built on a constant rhetoric of 'change'.

Unfortunately, for America and the World, Obama changed nothing and even kept Bush era 'advisors' around. Hell, he even reappointed Bush's pick for Federal Reserve chairman, Ben Bernanke, after he failed to foresee any indicator of a global economic meltdown.

Obama has opened the eyes of the youth and exposed who has the real power in our country. I predict dismal voter turnout across the board. Have fun with the constant bickering. It will mean nothing once the masses awake.

Last edited by 2e1m5a; 07-03-2012 at 03:36 PM..
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Old 07-03-2012, 03:48 PM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,387 posts, read 79,618,227 times
Reputation: 38726
Quote:
Originally Posted by banjomike View Post
Once a young person, or a person of any age, feels the empowerment of voting, they don't quit. Voting for the President of the United States is a lot deeper emotionally than voting for the Homecoming Queen or the Class President.

Obama put a lot of first time voters in the booths last time, and all one has to do is look at their own feelings to know what will happen this time.

How many of you regular voters never went back to vote again, ever, after voting for your first time?
How many of you who ever voted for an incumbent switched your vote to the other candidate the second time around?
How many of you whose first Presidential vote was for Reagan ever switched to a Democratic candidate afterward?
How many of you whose first Presidential candidate was Clinton switched to a Republican later?

Do you expect that the young are any different in this than you were when you were a young voter?

The motivations of the young vs. those of the old are different, but the beliefs that put the young in the voting booths in 2008 haven't changed much.

All of us who have voted before, often many times before, have mostly stuck with the beliefs that we favored the first time we showed up and punched in our choices.

Believing that the young are somehow totally different now is at best just wishful thinking. Like always, some will change sides, a few will sit this one out, but the most will vote the same way they did the first time they voted. We have all been disillusioned by some election or other at some time, but we don't generally quit voting completely if our side loses one, even when our side loses or wins by a landslide.

This election has every sign of being just as big as 2008. Do not think that those who emerged from the booths feeling victorious will suddenly change willy-nilly. Ron Paul may have captured some of the most disillusioned young voters, but he's not going to the a choice on the ballots.

Answer those questions above from your own personal history, and you will have the answer as to how the young, and all the other first-time voters of 2008, will do this year.
In many ways I agree and I only wish this was the case, regardless who they vote for, but I just don't see it that way.

Some young people, can't wait to vote again, I don't think is the majority of them. Many are a little disappointed in the system; remember young people are very idealistic, which certainly isn't bad, but when things don't turn out the way they had hoped, they get discouraged. I know a lot of young people who voted for the first time at one time or another, but got turned off until later in life. If noting else, the youth of today are not as pro our government and the way things work as kids were 30, 50 or 50 years ago. I want to say, they aren't as patriotic, but I don't want to sound negative. I think they are not as niave as we were or as innocent. Tech has changed all of us, for the better or the worse. Many of those who were so Obama are t pro Paul; they most likely will not vote at all or they will write his name in if they live in states that allow write ins.
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Old 07-03-2012, 04:24 PM
 
Location: Pluto's Home Town
9,995 posts, read 11,249,201 times
Reputation: 5556
I think I agree with the OP. Enthusiasm has dimmed for Mr. O. But I really don't think the kiddos are going to jump on the Bain Train........
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