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Old 07-16-2012, 09:33 AM
 
Location: Texas
43,478 posts, read 52,509,570 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Electric Blue View Post
I disagree. In places like Northern Virginia their is a large Indian-American population. Jim Webb won that senate race by a few thousand votes. Much of the reason was George Allen's ill advised Maccaca comment.
Which part are you disagreeing with?

In general, Indians aren't going to swing any election.
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Old 07-16-2012, 09:48 AM
 
Location: NC
1,946 posts, read 1,539,364 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stan4 View Post
The Indians who vote dem instead of republican do so because they hate republican foreign policy and yes...the racist anti-anyone-who-is-not-christian bent. I agree.

But given that Indians are business owners, professionals, and the richest minority in the country, they are voting against their own interests.

I am Indian and republican/libertarian, as are my parents. We will continue to vote republican as long as dem policy continues to be redistribution of wealth to the lazy and illegals.

There are not enough Indians in this country to swing any election.
I totally forgot about the Republican foreign policy of Endless War. India being a country which is constantly provoked by a hostile neighbor like Pakistan, and yet which maintains its cool, I would say the American policy of constant war with everyone they don't like, won't go down well with the Indian community. To add insult to injury, US taxpayer funded money flows to the Pakistani military via the foreign aid program, which in turn flows to the Pakistani-funded militant groups operating in Kashmir (Lashkar-e-Taiba, Jaish-e-Mohammed etc.). Add to it, the memories of being occupied by the British till 1947 makes them empathize with the Middle Eastern countries which the US occupy against the people's will. The Middle East also plays a big factor in the South Indian economy because of foreign remittance.

I agree about the Indians voting against their own interests. Indians are (or were) enamored with Bill Clinton and Obama, and hated Bush II, but yet it was Bush who inked the landmark Indo-US nuclear deal with Manmohan Singh.

All that said, there is little difference between the Democratic and Republican foreign policies these days, so it's all moot.
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Old 07-16-2012, 10:14 AM
 
1,059 posts, read 1,078,955 times
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Indian-Americans vote Democrat at a higher rate than any other Asian-American sub-group.

That might change in 20 years.

I disagree about IA's voting against their own interests. That's like saying poor whites that clearly benefit indirectly or directly from Government spending vote against their self interest when they come out in droves for R's. There is more to 'self interest' than your bank balance.

Many IA's (which I am one of) in the north east believe in the D platform even if it means higher taxes.

The R's don't make themselves feel welcome either with the over the top religiosity (I wonder if Jindal or Haley would've be in their positions if they were not xtian converts).

Even within the medical community where there are many wealthy IA's, the ones I know that vote R are specialists that bank tons of cash running procedure-heavy practices whereas many who are Internal Med, Family practice, or university physician groups vote D.

As for foreign policy concerns, the younger generation views that topic just like how a normal american would.

It's like asking why do jewish-americans vote heavy D when the R's suck israel's d**K at every chance they get. Indian Americans who were born here and are younger don't really think about indian foreign policy implications as their primary concern just like jewish-americans do have israeli interests at the forefront of their voting priorities.
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Old 07-16-2012, 12:18 PM
 
Location: NC
1,946 posts, read 1,539,364 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mufc1878 View Post
It's like asking why do jewish-americans vote heavy D when the R's suck israel's d**K at every chance they get. Indian Americans who were born here and are younger don't really think about indian foreign policy implications as their primary concern just like jewish-americans do have israeli interests at the forefront of their voting priorities.
Really? Indian Americans have Israeli interests at the forefront of their voting priorities? Indians do like Israel, especially when terrorist attacks happen in India (Mumbai 26/11, Akshardham Temple attack, 2001 Indian Parliament..the list goes on) and the government does nothing, angry Indians usually think fondly of Israel who, in a similar situation, would have hit back hard and kicked some Islamic terrorist ass. India also has some defense cooperation initiatives with Israel (joint training etc.), but Indians are hardly Zionists. Yes, even the Christian Indians.

Or did I completely misunderstand your statement?

Indians don't vote Democrat because they are Socialists (some of the South Indians and West Indians are, but not all), but because of the perception that Democrats are "better" for minorities. Indians don't like higher taxes.
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Old 07-16-2012, 12:23 PM
Sco
 
4,259 posts, read 4,230,743 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skoro View Post
I've been to Louisiana. It shouldn't serve as a model for America.
LOL, Louisiana is like the Somalia of the south.
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Old 07-16-2012, 12:33 PM
 
1,059 posts, read 1,078,955 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moving_pains View Post
Really? Indian Americans have Israeli interests at the forefront of their voting priorities? Indians do like Israel, especially when terrorist attacks happen in India (Mumbai 26/11, Akshardham Temple attack, 2001 Indian Parliament..the list goes on) and the government does nothing, angry Indians usually think fondly of Israel who, in a similar situation, would have hit back hard and kicked some Islamic terrorist ass. India also has some defense cooperation initiatives with Israel (joint training etc.), but Indians are hardly Zionists. Yes, even the Christian Indians.

Or did I completely misunderstand your statement?

Indians don't vote Democrat because they are Socialists (some of the South Indians and West Indians are, but not all), but because of the perception that Democrats are "better" for minorities. Indians don't like higher taxes.
I think you mis-understood my comment. What I was trying to say was in response to those talking about foreign policy specifically related to us-india being a key driver for voting trends (and my comment was regarding the younger IA vote).

I was trying to point out that it is similar when R's wonder why jewish-americans vote heavily Democratic when R's kowtow to israel more. Likewise, IA voting priorities are not first and foremost about india-US foreign policy so I do not think differences in Democratic foreign policy vs. R foreign policy is a huge driver of why IA's vote heavily Democratic.

I hope that made more sense?

As for higher taxes, I am speaking of many upper-middle class IA's and rich IA's that live in the North East. They do not mind paying higher taxes if it means for stronger public education and better public health/universal health initiatives.
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Old 07-16-2012, 01:01 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
1,609 posts, read 3,144,604 times
Reputation: 709
Quote:
Originally Posted by mufc1878 View Post
Indian-Americans vote Democrat at a higher rate than any other Asian-American sub-group.

That might change in 20 years.

I disagree about IA's voting against their own interests. That's like saying poor whites that clearly benefit indirectly or directly from Government spending vote against their self interest when they come out in droves for R's. There is more to 'self interest' than your bank balance.

Many IA's (which I am one of) in the north east believe in the D platform even if it means higher taxes.

The R's don't make themselves feel welcome either with the over the top religiosity (I wonder if Jindal or Haley would've be in their positions if they were not xtian converts).

Even within the medical community where there are many wealthy IA's, the ones I know that vote R are specialists that bank tons of cash running procedure-heavy practices whereas many who are Internal Med, Family practice, or university physician groups vote D.

As for foreign policy concerns, the younger generation views that topic just like how a normal american would.

It's like asking why do jewish-americans vote heavy D when the R's suck israel's d**K at every chance they get. Indian Americans who were born here and are younger don't really think about indian foreign policy implications as their primary concern just like jewish-americans do have israeli interests at the forefront of their voting priorities.
You are right here. Most IAs I know definitely vote Democratic and one of the major reasons is the hostility of Republicans to anyone who doesn't conform religiously. Jindal will not sway any Indian-Americans because he disavowed his cultural/religious roots for his political career. Same with Nikki Haley.

Traditional hostility of Republican presidents (Nixon, Reagan) towards India in favor of Pakistan plays a role too. This changed to a certain extent with Bush Jr, but has not had much of an impact.
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Old 07-16-2012, 01:24 PM
 
12,639 posts, read 7,299,380 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by asubram3 View Post
You are right here. Most IAs I know definitely vote Democratic and one of the major reasons is the hostility of Republicans to anyone who doesn't conform religiously. Jindal will not sway any Indian-Americans because he disavowed his cultural/religious roots for his political career. Same with Nikki Haley.

Traditional hostility of Republican presidents (Nixon, Reagan) towards India in favor of Pakistan plays a role too. This changed to a certain extent with Bush Jr, but has not had much of an impact.
George Bush was and is hugely popular in India, unlike the failed little tyrant occupying the White House for the next 140 some odd days:
Quote:
[LEFT]Bush's enormous popularity here probably comes as a surprise to most Americans, who have repeatedly been subject to the narrative that his "unilateralist" policies and cowboy swagger did unprecedented damage to the reputation of the United States. It was on this tide, in part, that Obama rode into office, repeatedly telling American audiences that his election would help restore America's place in the world.
But here in the world's second most populous country, many think what is unthinkable to American liberals: They long for the days of President Bush.


India's nostalgia for Bush is compounded by its wariness of Obama, who seems desirous of drawing us closer to China at the expense of Indo-American relations. His visit to Asia last month, during which the United States issued a joint communiqué with China expressing hope that the latter power would play a role in settling the decades-long dispute between India and Pakistan, roiled Delhi, which does not view China as an honest broker given its historic aggression against India (the two nations share the longest disputed border in the world) and its provision of military aid and nuclear technology to Pakistan. That Obama did not make a stop in India on his weeklong journey across the continent only exacerbated the uncertain feelings. Likewise, Obama's refusal to meet with the Dalai Lama, the Tibetan spiritual leader who has lived in India since his eviction from China 50 years ago, signaled that his administration is willing to downplay human rights to appease Beijing.



Read more: In the world's largest democracy, they're missing George W. Bush - NY Daily News
[/LEFT]
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Old 07-16-2012, 01:36 PM
 
1,059 posts, read 1,078,955 times
Reputation: 559
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trace21230 View Post
George Bush was and is hugely popular in India, unlike the failed little tyrant occupying the White House for the next 140 some odd days:



Read more: In the world's largest democracy, they're missing George W. Bush - NY Daily News[/color][/LEFT]
What Indians in India think is irrelevant to what IA's think because they are affected by US presidents and policy in completely different ways.

W is quite popular in India, agreed.
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Old 07-16-2012, 01:37 PM
 
Location: Chicago
38,690 posts, read 89,068,928 times
Reputation: 29446
Quote:
Originally Posted by Electric Blue View Post
I know quite a few Indian-Americans and they are not a monolith. Also,not all Indians are Hindu,some are Christian,many Catholic. BTW anyone remember slow Joe Biden's slight Indian accent comment?
Many of the Indians I've interacted with are Muslim.
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