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Old 11-13-2012, 11:46 AM
 
10,543 posts, read 11,680,657 times
Reputation: 2797

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This column below suggests that the results of the election were based on the electorate not being ready to face the hard choices involved in addressing the debt. This is interesting given that according to Gallup polls, Romney had the advantage on the economy and taxes (U.S. Foreign Policy Data Roundup: Candidates and Issues) and according to Gallup the economy was the top issue(Economy Is Dominant Issue for Americans as Election Nears). Does this have merit or what do you think explains it?

Obama has led US to £338bn bill - and to the edge of a financial abyss: Two brilliant voices give the ultimate verdict on Obama's divided America | Mail Online

"On the one hand there are the wealth creators and the self-reliant, who want the state out of their lives and a fair chance to rebuild business, enterprise and their bank balances after the debacle of the banking collapse of 2008.

On the other is the coalition of minorities put in place by President Obama, and which he exploited to secure his victory. Many of these people depend upon the welfare culture he has created – what the state calls ‘entitlements’.

The President’s plans to implement Obamacare – his health insurance programme – will only add to this, with the current $16 trillion debt reaching at least $20 trillion by the end of his term. One reason why taxes are scheduled to rise so much is that the Democrats have been so reluctant to cut back on welfare benefits for their clientele."

"The problem is that entitlements have to be funded, and the private sector increasingly resents being asked to pay higher taxes to do this, draining the productive sector of the economy of funds for investment.

People who run or work in private enterprises fail to see why they should work harder to fund Mr Obama’s clientele. And when they feel disincentivised, the country fails to achieve the growth it needs to prosper again.

The American electorate, on the other hand, took a conscious decision last week to avoid a confrontation with economic reality. The debt crisis, however, cannot just be brushed under the carpet.
As several European countries will testify, the more a nation borrows, the more expensive its debt will become to service.

Even some Democrat supporters refer to the ‘Latin American’ way in which politics is now done in this country. Large groups of voters are bought by bribes, and are bribed by a President who poses as morally superior and who uses public money to buy off his clientele."

"Even if a compromise is reached before January 1, and some means of saving more money can be found to prevent the enterprise-crushing tax rises, that will only be buying time.

At some stage a serious deficit reduction plan will have to be agreed, or America will head the same way as the eurozone. Paul Ryan, Mitt Romney’s running mate, is the architect of such a plan. However, the public just weren’t ready for that last week.
The mood is likely to change by the time of the mid-term elections in 2014, especially when it is realised how much Americans in work are paying for Americans who won’t work. "

"When things get worse – as they will – it will be America’s moment to realise that the rhetoric of ‘change’ has, instead, to be put into painful practice."
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Old 11-13-2012, 11:53 AM
 
Location: Dallas, TX
31,777 posts, read 24,001,037 times
Reputation: 12105
The same old rhetoric, presented as a new perspective. Color me surprised.
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Old 11-13-2012, 11:55 AM
 
10,543 posts, read 11,680,657 times
Reputation: 2797
Quote:
Originally Posted by EinsteinsGhost View Post
The same old rhetoric, presented as a new perspective. Color me surprised.
Missed or avoided the actual point. Color me surprised.
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Old 11-13-2012, 11:55 AM
 
37,998 posts, read 18,937,843 times
Reputation: 12082
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rggr View Post
This column below suggests that the results of the election were based on the electorate not being ready to face the hard choices involved in addressing the debt. This is interesting given that according to Gallup polls, Romney had the advantage on the economy and taxes (U.S. Foreign Policy Data Roundup: Candidates and Issues) and according to Gallup the economy was the top issue(Economy Is Dominant Issue for Americans as Election Nears). Does this have merit or what do you think explains it?

Obama has led US to £338bn bill - and to the edge of a financial abyss: Two brilliant voices give the ultimate verdict on Obama's divided America | Mail Online

"On the one hand there are the wealth creators and the self-reliant, who want the state out of their lives and a fair chance to rebuild business, enterprise and their bank balances after the debacle of the banking collapse of 2008.

On the other is the coalition of minorities put in place by President Obama, and which he exploited to secure his victory. Many of these people depend upon the welfare culture he has created – what the state calls ‘entitlements’.

The President’s plans to implement Obamacare – his health insurance programme – will only add to this, with the current $16 trillion debt reaching at least $20 trillion by the end of his term. One reason why taxes are scheduled to rise so much is that the Democrats have been so reluctant to cut back on welfare benefits for their clientele."

"The problem is that entitlements have to be funded, and the private sector increasingly resents being asked to pay higher taxes to do this, draining the productive sector of the economy of funds for investment.

People who run or work in private enterprises fail to see why they should work harder to fund Mr Obama’s clientele. And when they feel disincentivised, the country fails to achieve the growth it needs to prosper again.

The American electorate, on the other hand, took a conscious decision last week to avoid a confrontation with economic reality. The debt crisis, however, cannot just be brushed under the carpet.
As several European countries will testify, the more a nation borrows, the more expensive its debt will become to service.

Even some Democrat supporters refer to the ‘Latin American’ way in which politics is now done in this country. Large groups of voters are bought by bribes, and are bribed by a President who poses as morally superior and who uses public money to buy off his clientele."

"Even if a compromise is reached before January 1, and some means of saving more money can be found to prevent the enterprise-crushing tax rises, that will only be buying time.

At some stage a serious deficit reduction plan will have to be agreed, or America will head the same way as the eurozone. Paul Ryan, Mitt Romney’s running mate, is the architect of such a plan. However, the public just weren’t ready for that last week.
The mood is likely to change by the time of the mid-term elections in 2014, especially when it is realised how much Americans in work are paying for Americans who won’t work. "

"When things get worse – as they will – it will be America’s moment to realise that the rhetoric of ‘change’ has, instead, to be put into painful practice."
Good post. It will be too hard for the left to understand so get ready for more snide and abusive remarks.
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Old 11-13-2012, 11:56 AM
 
Location: Sonoran Desert
27,814 posts, read 37,852,315 times
Reputation: 17396
Wing nut talking points. Nothing new here.
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Old 11-13-2012, 12:00 PM
 
Location: USA - midwest
5,945 posts, read 4,713,893 times
Reputation: 2606
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rggr View Post
This column below suggests that the results of the election were based on the electorate not being ready to face the hard choices involved in addressing the debt. This is interesting given that according to Gallup polls, Romney had the advantage on the economy and taxes (U.S. Foreign Policy Data Roundup: Candidates and Issues) and according to Gallup the economy was the top issue(Economy Is Dominant Issue for Americans as Election Nears). Does this have merit or what do you think explains it?

Obama has led US to £338bn bill - and to the edge of a financial abyss: Two brilliant voices give the ultimate verdict on Obama's divided America | Mail Online

"On the one hand there are the wealth creators and the self-reliant, who want the state out of their lives and a fair chance to rebuild business, enterprise and their bank balances after the debacle of the banking collapse of 2008.

On the other is the coalition of minorities put in place by President Obama, and which he exploited to secure his victory. Many of these people depend upon the welfare culture he has created – what the state calls ‘entitlements’.

The President’s plans to implement Obamacare – his health insurance programme – will only add to this, with the current $16 trillion debt reaching at least $20 trillion by the end of his term. One reason why taxes are scheduled to rise so much is that the Democrats have been so reluctant to cut back on welfare benefits for their clientele."

"The problem is that entitlements have to be funded, and the private sector increasingly resents being asked to pay higher taxes to do this, draining the productive sector of the economy of funds for investment.

People who run or work in private enterprises fail to see why they should work harder to fund Mr Obama’s clientele. And when they feel disincentivised, the country fails to achieve the growth it needs to prosper again.

The American electorate, on the other hand, took a conscious decision last week to avoid a confrontation with economic reality. The debt crisis, however, cannot just be brushed under the carpet.
As several European countries will testify, the more a nation borrows, the more expensive its debt will become to service.

Even some Democrat supporters refer to the ‘Latin American’ way in which politics is now done in this country. Large groups of voters are bought by bribes, and are bribed by a President who poses as morally superior and who uses public money to buy off his clientele."

"Even if a compromise is reached before January 1, and some means of saving more money can be found to prevent the enterprise-crushing tax rises, that will only be buying time.

At some stage a serious deficit reduction plan will have to be agreed, or America will head the same way as the eurozone. Paul Ryan, Mitt Romney’s running mate, is the architect of such a plan. However, the public just weren’t ready for that last week.
The mood is likely to change by the time of the mid-term elections in 2014, especially when it is realised how much Americans in work are paying for Americans who won’t work. "

"When things get worse – as they will – it will be America’s moment to realise that the rhetoric of ‘change’ has, instead, to be put into painful practice."
Domestic policy is largely determined by congress.

It will be interesting to see how the GOP house performs over the next couple of years. If they continue to block progress, they'll likely be tossed in 2014. The voting public isn't stupid. The hyperpartisan right wingers have become willfully ignorant, though. Listening to Rove, Morris, Rasmussen, Fox News, etc.
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Old 11-13-2012, 12:04 PM
 
Location: Dallas, TX
31,777 posts, read 24,001,037 times
Reputation: 12105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rggr View Post
Missed or avoided the actual point. Color me surprised.
I missed something? Hell no. But, you're surely going to find enough fools who will take your words seriously. But then, I won't be surprised if you actually believed that Romney wasn't really McCain wasn't really Bush... because they all look different.
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Old 11-13-2012, 12:12 PM
 
10,543 posts, read 11,680,657 times
Reputation: 2797
Quote:
Originally Posted by EinsteinsGhost View Post
I missed something? Hell no. But, you're surely going to find enough fools who will take your words seriously. But then, I won't be surprised if you actually believed that Romney wasn't really McCain wasn't really Bush... because they all look different.
Your argument doesn't hold water and here is why.

Regardless of the all of those points and of the left's complaints and arguments against Romney's plan (or rhetoric), according to Gallup, he was seen as the best for handling the economy and the economy was the number one issue.

Your attacks on him or his plan do not negate the fact that the electorate did not vote for the person they saw as the most qualified to handle their number one issue. Whether he actually has the better plan in the long run is immaterial to the question- the electorate saw him as most competent on their number one issue and did not vote for him. Why? That's the question, not whether or not you think his plan is worthwhile.
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Old 11-13-2012, 12:16 PM
pvs
 
1,845 posts, read 2,867,040 times
Reputation: 1525
I stopped reading at "coalition of minorities put in place by President Obama", as this is not a new line.

Was their really any "new" perspective?

More wasted words, IMO.
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Old 11-13-2012, 12:20 PM
 
10,543 posts, read 11,680,657 times
Reputation: 2797
Quote:
Originally Posted by pvs View Post
I stopped reading at "coalition of minorities put in place by President Obama", as this is not a new line.

Was their really any "new" perspective?

More wasted words, IMO.
The new perspective was not a stance. It was a different take on why the election results turned out the way they did. Have you heard anyone suggest that it was because the populace wasn't ready to face the economic challenges? Maybe you have, I haven't. I've heard talk about the vaious demographics, religion etc., but hadn't heard this. I found it interesting given the poll results on the economy.
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