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Old 11-11-2014, 11:45 AM
 
12,639 posts, read 7,297,338 times
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The folks suggested as Democrat "rising stars" are by and large no-names with no real accomplishments. Chris Coons? LMAO. Amy Klobucher? Really?

The Democrats have a real leadership vacuum. The really sad thing is that for Democrats, the tyros listed above could not possibly be worse than the present failed leadership of that Party.
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Old 11-11-2014, 03:10 PM
 
Location: Cali
3,904 posts, read 6,185,109 times
Reputation: 2224
Quote:
Originally Posted by sanrene View Post
Very true. Look what has happened to the democrats, especially in the Senate, that voted for obamacare. Really, the only person they have for 2016 is Hillary.
Its pretty much or nobody for the democrats.
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Old 11-11-2014, 03:26 PM
 
8,070 posts, read 4,401,631 times
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I've done the research before that disproves your point. In 2014 7 of 11, age 30-39 are Repub. 14 of 18 elected, age 40-49 are Repub. That is both Congress Senate.

Suffice it to say that in the 2014 midterms the ratio of young Republicans to Democrats elected is about 75/25. You can go back further if you wish to prove you point. Here is the link for my research. 114th Congress New Members
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smash255 View Post
Somewhat misleading because you are making an apples to oranges comparison instead of apples to apples. Comparing Republicans elected over the last few years to Democratic leadserhip without mentioning GOP leadership ages or recently elected Democrats,
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Old 11-11-2014, 03:39 PM
 
Location: Long Island (chief in S Farmingdale)
18,978 posts, read 15,444,831 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by earthlyfather View Post
I've done the research before that disproves your point. In 2014 7 of 11, age 30-39 are Repub. 14 of 18 elected, age 40-49 are Repub. That is both Congress Senate.

Suffice it to say that in the 2014 midterms the ratio of young Republicans to Democrats elected is about 75/25. You can go back further if you wish to prove you point. Here is the link for my research. 114th Congress New Members
Of course the new members in 2014 are going to skew younger for the GOP than Dems. Everything is going to skew in the GOP's favor for 2014 because it was a strong GOP year.

My point was that the Dems also have some younger members (most of whom were elected in the Democratic class of 2012). The younger Republicans in Congress have gotten more attention than the younger Democrats in Congress, and the GOP had the advantage with younger members with the 2014 class (in large part due to their strong year), but there are a decent amount of young Dems as well.
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Old 11-11-2014, 05:24 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
14,330 posts, read 19,509,578 times
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Default The Republican record is hollow

Republicans have an uphill struggle because they have done nothing to prove that they are any better than the pathetic party they were exposed as being under Bush. Midterm elections don't change this reality. Obstructing, tea party-downgrading, gerrymandering, suppressing the vote, lying, deceptive marketing does not hide the fact that every Republican mentioned as a possible GOP presidential candidate is a better candidate to star in some episode of Creature Features. HOLOW better describes the Republican record of putting forth policies which benefit all, not just the rich.

ANY Dem can beat Republicans. If Hillary runs however, GAME OVER for the hapless Pubs. There is nothing more hollow than the GOP narrative.
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Old 11-11-2014, 07:40 PM
 
5,721 posts, read 5,453,721 times
Reputation: 3605
Quote:
Originally Posted by LexusNexus View Post
Republicans have an uphill struggle because they have done nothing to prove that they are any better than the pathetic party they were exposed as being under Bush. Midterm elections don't change this reality. Obstructing, tea party-downgrading, gerrymandering, suppressing the vote, lying, deceptive marketing does not hide the fact that every Republican mentioned as a possible GOP presidential candidate is a better candidate to star in some episode of Creature Features. HOLOW better describes the Republican record of putting forth policies which benefit all, not just the rich.

ANY Dem can beat Republicans. If Hillary runs however, GAME OVER for the hapless Pubs. There is nothing more hollow than the GOP narrative.
Bush is ancient history. You can't run in 2016 against somebody who hasn't been president for 8 years. I won't count either party out winning 2016.
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Old 11-11-2014, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Old Bellevue, WA
18,794 posts, read 14,233,084 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sanrene View Post
Very true. Look what has happened to the democrats, especially in the Senate, that voted for obamacare. Really, the only person they have for 2016 is Hillary.
That's a good point too. It is hard to overstate what a huge political miscalculation the handling of ACA was. Remember that it passed with zero Republican votes in both House and Senate, and was signed into law in March 2010 by the POTUS. The margin of support for Obamacare was so slender that Harry Reid had to resort to an arcane trick to avoid having it stopped by filibuster.

Then 8 months later, R's flipped 63 seats in the US House, taking a majority. Now D's had lost the ability to go back and enact changes to the 2700 page legislation.

Reid and Pelosi should not have arrogantly pushed forward such landmark legislation with zero bipartisan input or support. Likewise for Pres. Obama, and in particular Rahm Emanuel whose motto was "we have the votes, F*** 'em." Emanuel resigned as Obama's Chief of Staff in Oct, 2010, skating away from the catastrophic mess he left behind to go play mayor in Chicago.

They should have either done something to get GOP support, or backed away from passing the ACA. Because of their hubris they have hobbled the party for years to come.
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Old 11-11-2014, 08:38 PM
 
18,069 posts, read 11,070,220 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wutitiz View Post

They should have either done something to get GOP support, or backed away from passing the ACA. Because of their hubris they have hobbled the party for years to come.
The whole plan from the Republican side was there was never going to be GOP support for anything. Nothing. It wouldn't have mattered what Obama or the Democrats did, McConnell's whole strategy was to just say no to everything. So don't beat the "if only" drum. Should Democrats do the same to a future Republican president? Maybe it's the best play, who knows.

McConnell's counter plan was to prevent those deals. As McConnell told Josh Green, the key to eroding Obama's popularity was denying him the sheen of bipartisanship, and that meant keep Republicans united in opposition:
To prevent Obama from becoming the hero who fixed Washington, McConnell decided to break it. And it worked. Six years into the affair, we now take it for granted that nothing will pass on a bipartisan basis, no appointment will go through smoothly, and everything the administration tries to get done will take the form of a controversial use of executive power.
It's been ugly. But in most voters' mind, the ugliness has attached to Obama and, by extension, Democrats. It was a very counterintuitive strategy, but it was well-grounded in the best political science available. And it worked.

Mitch McConnell may be the greatest strategist in contemporary politics - Vox
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Old 11-11-2014, 09:06 PM
 
Location: Pluto's Home Town
9,995 posts, read 11,648,693 times
Reputation: 5580
LexusNexus brings a critical point. The GOP won in a politically ideal environment through negative campaigning, slick Machiavellian tactics, and deceit. Their legislative and leadership record for the last decade has been vacuous at best. They have not accomplished anything, and it appears that they are quite happy with that. McConnell is the poster boy for the 100% sabotage/0% accomplishment model. They are "hollowed out" by design, and that is just not appealing to anyone outside their own echo chamber. I would add that the GOP, in addition to doing just about nothing, habitually attacks and alienates most of their fellow citizens, even those in their own party who dare to think for themselves. They might be running 100% with their base, but are less than zero outside of it.
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Old 11-11-2014, 09:37 PM
 
Location: Old Bellevue, WA
18,794 posts, read 14,233,084 times
Reputation: 7950
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seacove View Post
The whole plan from the Republican side was there was never going to be GOP support for anything. Nothing. It wouldn't have mattered what Obama or the Democrats did, McConnell's whole strategy was to just say no to everything. So don't beat the "if only" drum. Should Democrats do the same to a future Republican president? Maybe it's the best play, who knows.

McConnell's counter plan was to prevent those deals. As McConnell told Josh Green, the key to eroding Obama's popularity was denying him the sheen of bipartisanship, and that meant keep Republicans united in opposition:
To prevent Obama from becoming the hero who fixed Washington, McConnell decided to break it. And it worked. Six years into the affair, we now take it for granted that nothing will pass on a bipartisan basis, no appointment will go through smoothly, and everything the administration tries to get done will take the form of a controversial use of executive power.
It's been ugly. But in most voters' mind, the ugliness has attached to Obama and, by extension, Democrats. It was a very counterintuitive strategy, but it was well-grounded in the best political science available. And it worked.

Mitch McConnell may be the greatest strategist in contemporary politics - Vox
I read both the Vox piece and most of the Atlantic piece (I hate reading stuff that long on-line). I'm not seeing the quote where McConnell says anything about denying Obama the 'sheen of bipartisanship.' The writer says that McConnell said it, but never provides a quote.

This whole grand theory about McConnell seems a little phantasmagoric to me. As one of your links points out, McConnell is not even that popular among GOP conservatives. The idea that McConnell could keep the 240 or so GOP congress critter in lockstep (in terms of voting against Obamacare) seems far fetched. More likely is that the GOP members all thought it was a bad idea, and all voted no. And as of today, it's looking like they were absolutely correct.
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