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Old 11-02-2015, 07:17 PM
 
1,265 posts, read 676,716 times
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Tax deductions for political broadcasting?

When electronic political broadcasting is an item of political campaign expenditure, it inevitably is the campaign’s most expensive items; but (within larger political jurisdictions) those political partisans that can afford the broadcasting time are purchasing the least expensive and generally most effective access per voter.

Political broadcasting expenditures are not tax deductable but often what is or is not political broadcasting cannot be clearly delineated. Commercial enterprises aggregate broadcast advertisement spending substantially affects USA’s political election outcomes and thus affects government policies.

What ‘s described as educational or issue topics are often more or less contrary or affirming potential or announced political election candidates’ positions. [For example Exxon commercials also promote the petroleum industry and directly or indirectly put forte Exxon’s corporate leaders’ viewpoints regarding environmental, and tax regulations. Ronald Reagan as a G.E. commercial spokesman certainly advanced his later political career.

Corporate executives determine the directions of their enterprises’ advertisements’ directions which are often contrary to many holders of publicly held shares.
Corporation executives influence over national and state policies are exceeded by the wealthy elite that directly fund political broadcasting or have leverage to in the process to select the corporations’ directors and the top administrators.

I’m a proponent of” unbundling” the prices of purchasing electronic broadcasting time to that of any other costs of producing broadcasting content.
[There’s a precedent for such a federal law Computer hardware expenditures and billing were” unbundled” from software to break IBM’s extremely dominate competitive position within the data processing industry].

We cannot eliminate wealth’s leveraged power to influence political elections, but we can reduce individuals and corporate powers to do so. This could be accomplished by separating expenditures for electronic broadcasting and broadcasting time from the expenditures for creating broadcasting content.
The expenditures for broadcasting time should not be government supported by deductions from taxable income. There’s a precedent for such a federal law Computer hardware expenditures and billing were” unbundled” from software to break IBM’s extremely dominate competitive position within the data processing industry.

Additionally I advocate reducing tax income tax deductions due to contributions for tax free entities; the amount of deduction should be reduced proportional to the tax free enterprises’ expenditures for electronic broadcasting time (rather than expenditures for producing broadcasting content).

Respectfully, Supposn
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