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View Poll Results: When will Democrats achieve a Senate majority again?
2018 midterm 32 23.88%
2020 presidential 22 16.42%
2022 midterm 17 12.69%
2024 presidential 9 6.72%
2026 midterm or later 13 9.70%
Not in our lifetime 41 30.60%
Voters: 134. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-25-2017, 03:49 PM
 
Location: Texas
35,076 posts, read 19,184,144 times
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Probably not next year.

The deciding factor will be the economy. When it takes a dump, the majority party will be swept out.
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Old 04-25-2017, 04:24 PM
 
Location: Atlanta metro (Cobb County)
1,539 posts, read 727,773 times
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As of today on this poll, it's interesting that the 2024 presidential election is the LEAST popular guess so far for when the Senate will flip. Typically one party wins two presidential terms and then the other party takes over, which has happened ever since 1992.

So if the pattern continues, Trump will win re-election but then a Democrat will succeed him in 2024. When a president wins the election, generally his party performs well in Senate races of the same year, so I think that 2024 is a reasonable guess for when the Senate could flip again. I agree to some extent with the posters who say that the Democratic party is too pre-occupied with identity politics issues and out of touch with everyday Americans away from the major coastal cities. But the party is likely to work out a better strategy eventually, as they will have had enough of losing and new candidates will emerge on the scene. It isn't going to be 2017 forever and eventually Trump and the Republican Congress will have a track record, which may or may not work to their advantage.

It's great to see so many responses to the poll - especially those that are more objective rather than blindly partisan on either side. As many Americans discovered recently, what you WANT to happen and what DOES occur are not necessarily the same. Geography matters in electoral politics and a party that ignores this will reap the consequences.
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Old 04-25-2017, 04:49 PM
 
8,063 posts, read 3,871,148 times
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They will not win any new seats on their aditude way they appear not to work with anyone.
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Old 04-26-2017, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Northwest Peninsula
3,180 posts, read 1,582,224 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheCityTheBridge View Post
House races are local, not statewide. Districts vary dramatically in their electorate in comparison to states as a whole.

It's early. The House is hard to predict. But a deeply unpopular Republican President offers real opportunity for the Democrats to retake the House. Democrats in special elections are running well above party baselines in the contested districts. But like I said--a lot can change between now & November 2018.
After the democratic party poured millions into the Georgia special election and backing a candidate that doesn't live in the district he is running in and couldn't even vote for himself and you think the electoral will some how look the other way?

Seems Trump is mostly unpopular to liberals which is still smarting from election loses all over the nation.

Kansas and Montana will stay republican and all the other states are pending. But I think Georgia race will stay in the republican column.
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Old 04-26-2017, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Northwest Peninsula
3,180 posts, read 1,582,224 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Gringo View Post
Probably not next year.

The deciding factor will be the economy. When it takes a dump, the majority party will be swept out.
True and a lot of people both republican and independents and some democrats voted for trump to stop illegal aliens from entering the country. But if and when they pass tax reform the economy will follow.
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Old 04-26-2017, 12:01 PM
 
Location: Northwest Peninsula
3,180 posts, read 1,582,224 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GHOSTRIDER AZ View Post
They will not win any new seats on their aditude way they appear not to work with anyone.
Agree....Trump support was in part because he wanted to build a southern wall and Chuckles the clown Schumer came out yesterday and said he and his party would shut down the government if money was allocated for that purpose....As soon as the budget is passed avoiding a government shut down, I hope Ryan will bring forth a bill to do just that. The wall will save billions to tax payer supporting illegal aliens and enough to built the wall.
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Old 04-27-2017, 03:47 AM
 
885 posts, read 1,088,660 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jas75 View Post
As of today on this poll, it's interesting that the 2024 presidential election is the LEAST popular guess so far for when the Senate will flip. Typically one party wins two presidential terms and then the other party takes over, which has happened ever since 1992.

So if the pattern continues, Trump will win re-election but then a Democrat will succeed him in 2024. When a president wins the election, generally his party performs well in Senate races of the same year, so I think that 2024 is a reasonable guess for when the Senate could flip again. I agree to some extent with the posters who say that the Democratic party is too pre-occupied with identity politics issues and out of touch with everyday Americans away from the major coastal cities. But the party is likely to work out a better strategy eventually, as they will have had enough of losing and new candidates will emerge on the scene. It isn't going to be 2017 forever and eventually Trump and the Republican Congress will have a track record, which may or may not work to their advantage.

It's great to see so many responses to the poll - especially those that are more objective rather than blindly partisan on either side. As many Americans discovered recently, what you WANT to happen and what DOES occur are not necessarily the same. Geography matters in electoral politics and a party that ignores this will reap the consequences.
You're forgetting that unless the Republicans make a significant gain in 2018, the Senators up for re-election in 2024 will be overwhelmingly Democrat already. The Senate classes up for re-election in 2020 and 2022 are significantly Republican.
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Old 04-27-2017, 09:31 AM
 
Location: Atlanta metro (Cobb County)
1,539 posts, read 727,773 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dxdtdemon View Post
You're forgetting that unless the Republicans make a significant gain in 2018, the Senators up for re-election in 2024 will be overwhelmingly Democrat already. The Senate classes up for re-election in 2020 and 2022 are significantly Republican.
True, the scenario of the Senate flipping in 2024 would likely require a good Republican year in 2018, then good Democratic years in 2020, 2022 and 2024. Not likely all of these outcomes would take place, but special elections resulting from out-of-cycle deaths or resignations could trigger some unpredictable results. Several senators are in their 70s and 80s, so some of their seats are going to turn over at some point in the near future.
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Old 04-27-2017, 07:21 PM
 
18,664 posts, read 7,257,655 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jas75 View Post
True, the scenario of the Senate flipping in 2024 would likely require a good Republican year in 2018, then good Democratic years in 2020, 2022 and 2024. Not likely all of these outcomes would take place, but special elections resulting from out-of-cycle deaths or resignations could trigger some unpredictable results. Several senators are in their 70s and 80s, so some of their seats are going to turn over at some point in the near future.

The Dems missed their golden opportunity in 2018, when GOP had 23 seats up, but Dems flipped just a few.

That makes it unlikely Dems can flip Senate far beyond 2024.
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Old 04-27-2017, 08:18 PM
 
8,063 posts, read 3,871,148 times
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At this rate on not contributing to the issue and as Trump is checking off goals. Dem's will continue to look bad!
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