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Old 08-09-2018, 06:55 PM
 
Location: Old Bellevue, WA
18,794 posts, read 14,219,961 times
Reputation: 7950

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Quote:
Originally Posted by odanny View Post
Thanks for that info.

Ultimately a step in the right direction, private sector unions can grow quickly.
Only about 6% of private sector jobs are now union nationwide. I am in a non-RTW state (WA) and it has not helped with private sector union growth. I do not favor so-called RTW, by the way.


We have Amazon here which, AFAIK, is 100% non-union. The problem, according to what I have been told by a union organizer, is that it's too easy for employers to fight efforts to organize. Employees become a 'captive audience' were the exact words he used.


IMO unions are way behind the curve in using the web to circumvent the 'captive audience' factor.
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Old 08-09-2018, 07:45 PM
 
Location: Proxima Centauri
4,727 posts, read 1,954,508 times
Reputation: 5150
Thank God. Some good news for a change. Things are getting worse for working people. Salaries are flat and pensions are becoming scarce. Americans know that every country in Europe mandates four weeks of paid vacation by law, while Americans are falling further behind. American companies can make a person a professional or a manager at 30K allowing the company to make them salaried. Congratulations Missouri. The show me state showed the rest how it's done.



Perhaps people are finally seeing Fox News and Breightbart for the propaganda machines that they are.

Last edited by Tonyafd; 08-09-2018 at 07:58 PM..
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Old 08-09-2018, 08:29 PM
 
Location: NE Mississippi
13,452 posts, read 8,472,056 times
Reputation: 19551
It won't make any difference. Nationwide, only 11% of the workforce belongs to unions.
Even though 60% of people say they support unions, the unions themselves are simply too weak and self serving to take advantage of that fact.
The law will simply support the status quo. Right to work states attract industry.

https://www.theatlantic.com/business...o-work/567092/


9.7% of workers in Missouri are represented by a union. Texas, where so many new jobs and industries are relocating, has 4% of its workers represented by union.

https://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2017/un...te-in-2016.htm
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Old 08-11-2018, 11:54 PM
 
Location: Stillwater, Oklahoma
14,738 posts, read 13,251,868 times
Reputation: 4473
Quote:
Originally Posted by Listener2307 View Post
It won't make any difference. Nationwide, only 11% of the workforce belongs to unions.
Even though 60% of people say they support unions, the unions themselves are simply too weak and self serving to take advantage of that fact.
The law will simply support the status quo. Right to work states attract industry.

https://www.theatlantic.com/business...o-work/567092/

No, right to work states certainly do not attract industry. This is because not one supporter of Right to Work can name one business that came to Oklahoma mainly because it has Right to Work.
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Old 11-07-2018, 10:25 AM
 
Location: Kansas City, MISSOURI
8,842 posts, read 2,658,662 times
Reputation: 6789
This is related. Missouri yesterday passed an increase in the minimum wage to $12 by 2023, winning by 62%. The rate will be indexed to inflation after 2023. That, coupled with pro-union result in the primary, makes Missouri a pretty strong pro-labor state.

Missouri Voters Approve Minimum Wage Hike
Quote:
The lowest-paid workers across Missouri will see their hourly wages increase soon, thanks to a ballot measure passed Tuesday.

A majority of voters approved an initiative that will gradually raise the wage floor throughout the state to $12 per hour. The Missouri minimum wage, currently set at $7.85, will bump to $8.60 next year, then increase 85 cents each year thereafter until it reaches $12 in 2023. After that, it would rise or fall each year according to an inflation index.
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