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Old 05-10-2008, 04:12 PM
 
11,128 posts, read 12,385,419 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frankie117 View Post
Allowing only educated people to vote comes off as very elitist to me. What you're doing is allowing one group of people control the entire population.

Being 'educated' does not make you better than anyone else; It does not give you the right to pass judgment because of your 'education'.

Being educated also does not mean you automatically know what is best for everyone else, nor does it make your opinion matter more than anyone else's.
I think I "get it" as I posted previously.


Quote:
Originally Posted by TnHilltopper View Post
Lets not confuse the educated with being intelligent. The American educational system today is famous for teaching kids and people what to think instead of how to think. As has been offered by the many post on this and other forums.

One of the historical and key signs of intelligence is a burning curiosity about the world around us, at least in my opinion. As curiosity leads to questioning the world around us instead of merely taking things on faith or believing them to be true because we were told they were.

Examples of this premise in how it relates to politics are people from any given political philosophy that start out threads, comments or make statements such as, "All dems/repubs are (or believe or behave) like this or that". This very statement reeks of ignorance, generalization, and leads to a polemic defense of ones own views, supported by evidence derived through confirmation bias.

This is how a patent clerk can become one of the greatest minds known in human history or why a Yale grad may end up not being able to articulate a basic simple sentence in the English language.
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Old 05-10-2008, 04:14 PM
 
Location: Southeast
4,296 posts, read 6,121,333 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TnHilltopper View Post
I think I "get it" as I posted previously.
That wasn't actually directed at you - I was quoting the original statement that the topic started with.
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Old 05-10-2008, 04:17 PM
 
11,128 posts, read 12,385,419 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frankie117 View Post
That wasn't actually directed at you - I was quoting the original statement that the topic started with.
Pardon me, my bad.
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Old 05-10-2008, 04:19 PM
 
90 posts, read 220,379 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ndfmnlf View Post
The imperfect way to measure this is to use the person's ability to enter and perhaps finish college. It is imperfect because it does not measure all the facets of intelligence, but it is better than none.
Ok, so what about the fact that a college education 50 years ago was much, much less accessible than it is today? Financial assistance wasn't readily available, and many if not most jobs didn't require a degree. I doubt anyone would be hard pressed to come up with many people they know in an older generation that they would consider educated but who do not have a college degree.

Also, are you then relying on the educated voter to do what is in the best interest of the non-educated? You would be taking power away from those with the least power to start with and putting it in the hands of those who are already most poised for success. You would just rely on the altruism of the more educated?
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Old 05-10-2008, 05:08 PM
 
2,260 posts, read 3,305,192 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ndfmnlf View Post
Ahhh....you've committed the fallacy of the consequent. Your fallacy is that you've transmogrified the statement "most educated voters vote for Obama" into "all educated voters vote for Obama". The former is a true statement (based on polling data), while the latter is obviously a false statement. But you've latched on to the latter statement as if that was what I was saying. Clearly, you need to check your faculties before responding.
The statement 'most educated voters vote for Obama' isn't true.
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Old 05-10-2008, 05:13 PM
 
Location: Southeast
4,296 posts, read 6,121,333 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paullySC View Post
The statement 'most educated voters vote for Obama' isn't true.
I agree. Most of Obama's support comes from the African American community, along with other minorities. Statistically there are much lower college degree holding voters in those groups.
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Old 05-10-2008, 05:16 PM
 
4,182 posts, read 5,664,399 times
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Quote:
Also, are you then relying on the educated voter to do what is in the best interest of the non-educated? You would be taking power away from those with the least power to start with and putting it in the hands of those who are already most poised for success. You would just rely on the altruism of the more educated?
Good education as I defined earlier is not as high a bar as it sounds. The critical thing is for the person to have a demonstrated ability to reason and to have basic knowledge of science, math, and the humanities - all of which should be attainable at the high school level. Since universal secondary education is already mandatory, then everyone should theoretically have access to it and everyone should therefore be eligible to vote.

Unfortunately, at the present time, high school education is inadequate in many places, hence college education becomes necessary for one to receive a well-rounded education. The impetus then is to improve our high school education so that a college education will not be necessary for one to vote.

But let's be honest about it. Do we really want the uninformed, uneducated voter to be making decisions of monumental importance to the nation? Are we willing to dumb down the political process? Do you want a voter who believes that the earth is flat or is 6000 years old to be voting on issues such as stem cell research? Or the voter who believes that the Second Coming of Christ can be accelerated by voting for a candidate with an uncompromisingly hawkish stance on Mideast issues? The importance of having voters who have undergone reality-based educationsreally takes center stage here.
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Old 05-10-2008, 05:25 PM
 
Location: Your mind
2,923 posts, read 4,488,788 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by walidm View Post
And who, may I ask, typically are called to represent "the less-educated and typically less affluent". I'd venture to say the more affluent, more educated, most empathetic populace.
Typically, but I wouldn't take away their power to decide which more affluent, more educated individual they feel deserves their vote.
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Old 05-10-2008, 05:38 PM
 
3,413 posts, read 6,320,735 times
Reputation: 1410
Quote:
Originally Posted by ndfmnlf View Post
Good education as I defined earlier is not as high a bar as it sounds. The critical thing is for the person to have a demonstrated ability to reason and to have basic knowledge of science, math, and the humanities - all of which should be attainable at the high school level. Since universal secondary education is already mandatory, then everyone should theoretically have access to it and everyone should therefore be eligible to vote.

Unfortunately, at the present time, high school education is inadequate in many places, hence college education becomes necessary for one to receive a well-rounded education. The impetus then is to improve our high school education so that a college education will not be necessary for one to vote.

But let's be honest about it. Do we really want the uninformed, uneducated voter to be making decisions of monumental importance to the nation? Are we willing to dumb down the political process? Do you want a voter who believes that the earth is flat or is 6000 years old to be voting on issues such as stem cell research? Or the voter who believes that the Second Coming of Christ can be accelerated by voting for a candidate with an uncompromisingly hawkish stance on Mideast issues? The importance of having voters who have undergone reality-based educationsreally takes center stage here.
Yes! I absolutely want them to have their vote. One person, one vote.
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Old 05-10-2008, 05:53 PM
 
Location: Sugar Land, TX
437 posts, read 562,601 times
Reputation: 73
I don't have any more faith in the educated than I do the uneducated, to be honest.
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