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Old 05-10-2008, 11:51 AM
 
29,463 posts, read 33,710,678 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ryneone View Post
Would that not support Bush cities were more educated?

Read the analysis between the two graphs. That is not the conclusion they drew. The names in the chart are reversed from charts one and two. That could be confusing. There analysis were that the 15 Bush cities had an average rank of 51 and Kerry 27. It is a brief synopsis and I would suggest everyone read for themselves. Your point that Bush cities were higher in education is accurate however the analysis is measuring literacy. The posters here are all over the chart in what they consider education and educated. Again each should read and refer to in their post as appropriate for the point they wish to make. In terms of pure education your position would be supported.
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Old 05-10-2008, 11:55 AM
 
4,182 posts, read 5,660,148 times
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Quote:
He performs well in those areas because of the YOUNG vote. IMO you are not "educated" until at least 10 yrs in the WORKFORCE. College students are not necessarily educated people, they are developing their education. I dont think education level has anything to do with Obama supporters but age definitely does. A degree doesnt mean you are "educated" in life or politics.
10 years in the workforce actually narrows your perspective to that of your field of work. You certainly learn other things in the work force, but these do not necessarily translate into a well-rounded view of political issues.

It's not just the youth vote that Obama wins in urban areas with universities. He also wins among older voters as long as they have at least a college education.
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Old 05-10-2008, 11:55 AM
 
29,463 posts, read 33,710,678 times
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Education - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

well-educated - definition of well-educated by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.

Literacy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

To perhaps help to differentiate between education, educated and literacy. If we use terms correctly we might find out we all agree.
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Old 05-10-2008, 11:57 AM
 
Location: Southeast
4,296 posts, read 6,116,687 times
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Only educated people allowed to vote? That is probably the worst idea ever. There goes 'educated' types thinking they know what is best for everyone again.

This is worse than the idea of letting only Atheists run for any and all political positions.
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Old 05-10-2008, 12:01 PM
 
Location: Romeoville, IL
1,238 posts, read 2,181,016 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ndfmnlf View Post
10 years in the workforce actually narrows your perspective to that of your field of work. You certainly learn other things in the work force, but these do not necessarily translate into a well-rounded view of political issues.

It's not just the youth vote that Obama wins in urban areas with universities. He also wins among older voters as long as they have at least a college education.
Yeah, against Hillary Clinton.

And some dumb**** kid from college who took one year of political science and can write a paper doesn't constitute as intelligence. Trust me, I go to college, and the people who support Obama are not worth a dime. I support Obama too, but it isn't because I think I am better than everyone else because I took a couple gen ed classes and have 'perspective.' I support him because of some of his positions on education reform, and his ideas for college students to reduce tuition. Also, he isn't as polarizing as Hillary or McCain.
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Old 05-10-2008, 12:01 PM
 
4,182 posts, read 5,660,148 times
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Quote:
More successful people vote Republican, so I would think that would correlate with higher education
You are conflating high education with high income. That's a non-sequitur. There are high income people with low educational attainment, and there are highly educated people with low income. Your data merely shows that high income people vote Republican. We already know that. It does not show that highly educated people vote Republican. I hope you can tell the difference.

And by the way, I would appreciate a link or citation to your statistics.
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Old 05-10-2008, 12:10 PM
 
8,758 posts, read 8,637,221 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ndfmnlf View Post
You are conflating high education with high income. That's a non-sequitur. There are high income people with low educational attainment, and there are highly educated people with low income. Your data merely shows that high income people vote Republican. We already know that. It does not show that highly educated people vote Republican. I hope you can tell the difference.

And by the way, I would appreciate a link or citation to your statistics.


There have been many studies on the correlation between eduation and income levels.



THE ECONOMIC VALUE OF HIGHER EDUCATION

[LEFT]There is considerable support for the notion that the rate of return on investment in higher education is high enough to warrant the financial burden associated with pursuing a college degree. Though the earnings differential between college and high school graduates varies over time, college graduates, on average, earn more than high school graduates. According to the Census Bureau, over an adult's working life, high school graduates earn an average of $1.2 million; associate's degree holders earn about $1.6 million; and bachelor's degree holders earn about $2.1 million (Day and Newburger, 2002).[/LEFT]



The Value of a College Degree. ERIC Digest.
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Old 05-10-2008, 12:19 PM
 
1,572 posts, read 3,608,833 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ndfmnlf View Post
I wonder what would happen if we passed a constitutional amendment allowing only those with a college education and higher the right to vote.
I'd leave the country...

Quote:
Or for those who can't go to college for whatever reason, they should at least pass some kind of mental aptitude or intelligence test before being allowed to vote.?
Then it wouldn't be called Democracy. It would be more like an oligarchy.

Ideally dumb people shouldn't think about policy too much, they should just vote for people that are smarter than they are. That failed with George Bush, because I think Americans have gotten their priorities and values screwed up. They'd rather elect a frat boy than a scholar. That doesn't mean the system is broken, though, just in need of a tweak. Maybe campaign finance reform and more media deregulation is needed.
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Old 05-10-2008, 12:28 PM
 
4,182 posts, read 5,660,148 times
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Quote:
There have been many studies on the correlation between eduation and income levels.


High education may lead to high income, but high education doesn't necessarily mean you will vote Republican. Your fallacy is known as Affirming the consequent - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

1.Highly educated people make a high income.
2.High income people vote Republican.
3. Therefore, highly educated people vote Republican.

or

1. If P (high education), then Q (high income)
2. Q (high income) votes Republican
3. Therefore P (high education) votes Republican.

In other words, high education and high income are independent variables when determining party affiliation. Yes, high education leads to high income, but it is fallacious to conclude that high education leads to Republican party affiliation.
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Old 05-10-2008, 12:34 PM
 
29,463 posts, read 33,710,678 times
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Now this is the way a forum should be.
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