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Old 05-11-2009, 06:36 PM
 
34,990 posts, read 34,689,444 times
Reputation: 6163

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frankie117 View Post
Actually the tech bubble was the 80s, dot com was the 90s, and housing was 00s. Not so sure about oil, are you talking 70s or 2005(ish)-2008?

Personally I do not believe bubble economies are beneficial at all, they work wonders until they burst, then all hell breaks loose. However, it is difficult to recover from a recession without a bubble. We have to decide whether to accept a fast growing economy and cyclic severe recession or a sluggish growing economy with mild recessions...
Frankie, you're talking about which approach to repairing the economy will prevail, the cyclical or the structural approach.
Without policies that put the nation on the path to higher median incomes, higher productivity, renewable energy and a more accessible and efficient health-care system, we'll face deeper and more prolonged recessions, followed by ever more anemic upturns. Bill Clinton's inability to do enough about these problems in the 1990s, followed by George W. Bush's negligent disregard of them, allowed them to grow to the point where any major triggering event can cause a vicious downward spiral.

As early as next year [2009], the business cycle may hit bottom and begin climbing. At that point, cyclists and structuralists will want two different things -- and which side the president chooses will be, as Will Marshall of the Progressive Policy Institute puts it, the "central drama" of the Obama administration.
From an earlier post linked on this same page,
The emerging debate over Wall Street's and the Big Three's ongoing obligations to reform themselves is but one part of a much larger national debate we'll be entering upon in 2009 and beyond -- whether the economic crisis we're experiencing is basically cyclical (in which case, nothing really needs to change over the long term, after the economy gets back on track) or structural (in which case, many aspects of our economy and society will needs to change permanently).
Robert Reich's Blog
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Old 05-11-2009, 07:06 PM
 
Location: SE Arizona - FINALLY! :D
19,868 posts, read 22,731,855 times
Reputation: 7167
Delusianne -

Sadly, I can't rep you right now, but just wanted to let you know: Great Post (as is usually the case).

Ken
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Old 05-11-2009, 07:23 PM
 
Location: Southeast
4,296 posts, read 6,261,796 times
Reputation: 1445
Quote:
Originally Posted by delusianne View Post
Frankie, you're talking about which approach to repairing the economy will prevail, the cyclical or the structural approach.
Without policies that put the nation on the path to higher median incomes, higher productivity, renewable energy and a more accessible and efficient health-care system, we'll face deeper and more prolonged recessions, followed by ever more anemic upturns. Bill Clinton's inability to do enough about these problems in the 1990s, followed by George W. Bush's negligent disregard of them, allowed them to grow to the point where any major triggering event can cause a vicious downward spiral.

As early as next year [2009], the business cycle may hit bottom and begin climbing. At that point, cyclists and structuralists will want two different things -- and which side the president chooses will be, as Will Marshall of the Progressive Policy Institute puts it, the "central drama" of the Obama administration.
From an earlier post linked on this same page,
The emerging debate over Wall Street's and the Big Three's ongoing obligations to reform themselves is but one part of a much larger national debate we'll be entering upon in 2009 and beyond -- whether the economic crisis we're experiencing is basically cyclical (in which case, nothing really needs to change over the long term, after the economy gets back on track) or structural (in which case, many aspects of our economy and society will needs to change permanently).
Robert Reich's Blog
I believe in the cyclical approach. If you look at the GDP and unemployment charts from the previous page, you will see that we hit a recession every 10 years or so. I still believe that recession is a necessary part of the economy because it eliminates factors that are clearly not viable. A purge if you will. That is why we see downturn after the burst of bubbles - It is the market making a correction.

We paid dearly here in 2009 for action taken in 2000/2001 to prevent a recession. We still had a minor recession early in 2001, but it was no where near the downturn we see now. By not undoing the original correctional devices (interest rates, for example), we paid dearly.

Recession can and will hit any economy. Even the USSR's command economy suffered from the same economic troubles as the US in the late 70s/early 80s (stagflation). You can't avoid it, your best bet is to ride it out and wait for the inevitable upswing.
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Old 05-12-2009, 09:31 AM
 
Location: Charlotte
12,646 posts, read 13,897,232 times
Reputation: 1679
It will be interesting to see how the era of behavioral economics will effect us and perhaps change the prior cyclical nature of the economy. No matter what changes occur, some of what ails us is a severe structural problem which must be addressed. Clearly the math shows healthcare is the virus that ails us.
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Old 05-12-2009, 10:07 AM
 
Location: Texas...and proud of it.
746 posts, read 846,575 times
Reputation: 164
Just a bear market rally, don't worry about it.
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Old 05-12-2009, 10:32 AM
 
Location: SE Arizona - FINALLY! :D
19,868 posts, read 22,731,855 times
Reputation: 7167
Quote:
Originally Posted by bgibbs42 View Post
Just a bear market rally, don't worry about it.
Don't worry - it's just a bear market rally!
Are you worried it's NOT a bear market rally?
Why is that?
It certanly sounds like that's what you are worried about.
Image that, worried that things might recover.
Are you wishing for a collapse of the economy?
Do you HATE America?


Why would that be?


Ken
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Old 05-12-2009, 11:06 AM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
41,505 posts, read 51,247,292 times
Reputation: 24611
I would like to see a structural recovery where the economic gains were accumulated by the lower and middle segments of the population before any were distributed to the top. This would soon provide prosperity for most of us instead of a very few. A capital market free of speculators would be a place to start.
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Old 06-01-2009, 12:24 PM
 
Location: San Diego
5,319 posts, read 7,839,716 times
Reputation: 3376
Default Dow Above 8,700 !!!

Dow at 8,729 as of 2:21 EST - UP 2.79% today !!!
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Old 06-01-2009, 12:29 PM
 
305 posts, read 482,077 times
Reputation: 206
Quote:
Originally Posted by pghquest View Post
haha, the higher the market goes, the more money Republicans have to run an election lying about those areas that Obama has failed and the massive spending, deficits and control that he is proposing..
Fixed your post
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Old 06-01-2009, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
9,043 posts, read 11,580,134 times
Reputation: 1392
Quote:
Originally Posted by JBoughton View Post
Fixed your post
Only OCD infected individuals do such a thing.
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