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Old 03-06-2015, 10:25 AM
 
3,751 posts, read 3,475,524 times
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People always act like the 80s is ancient and antiquated while the 90s is still fresh and relevant, and I used to feel that way myself.

But recently I've been looking at photos and videos from the 90s and listening to 90s music I grew up with and honestly most of the 90s was not that different from the 80s. 90s pop music was still full of gated drums and cheesiness, and there wasn't nearly as much rap on the charts as you'd think. Bryan Adams and Michael Bolton were still considered the bees knees from 1990 to 1994, that's how bad it was. Hell even Britney's debut album is much more similar to a Debbie Gibson album than to any recent pop album I've heard.

Even as late as 1997 you still had tons of people with thick rimmed glasses, mullets, overalls, and turtlenecks! The clothes people wore in the early and middle 90s are much more similar to 70s and 80s clothing than to clothing from after 2000. The TV was more similar too, sitcoms still dominated though when South Park came out I think things became a lot raunchier. The only reality shows from the 90s I can remember are Blind Date, COPS and The Real World.

Most people would probably peg this video around 1990, but it's actually from 1997.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A81IwlDeV6c

I think people think 1989 and before was pre-Internet times and 1990 to today is the "Internet era" (the Internet's actually existed since the 70s) and they're like day and night. But actually Internet use was surprisingly low even in 1999 - only about 35-40% of Americans were online then (and far lower than that for almost every other country in the world), and fewer than 10 percent in 1994. Hardly anyone was online in 1993 aside from gamers and academics. If you were lucky you might have had a college email address but that's about it. Most people in western countries didn't even own computers, only a large minority did. The world was still a much bigger place than today and information traveled a lot more slowly even though "globalization" was really starting to kick into gear then.


Cell phones were around throughout the 90s but there wasn't really a "cell phone culture" until the early 2000s. My parents didn't have cell phones until 2003. Most people didn't feel a need to have one because there was a payphone on every corner, the sound quality was inferior, and they were expensive compared to landlines. I do remember many people owned "beepers".

Digital cameras were apparently around but I don't remember them until the very late 90s and the quality was so terrible and the price so high that everyone still used film, even as late as the early 2000s. The only digital technology that pretty much everyone used was CD players.

Lastly, Clinton and Reagan are not nearly as different as people think. Reagan was a neocon, and Clinton was a very right-leaning neoliberal. The 90s was just as much a conservative capitalist money-loving decade as the 80s. Worldwide even more so than the 80s when you consider the 90s was the decade of the Washington consensus and austerity.
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Old 03-06-2015, 11:13 PM
 
14 posts, read 16,883 times
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I don't know if there's a decade that is across the board different compared to the previous.

It was real mix of 80's and 90's hairdos and clothes with every day people and sometimes celebrities throughout the 90's. Hardcore 80's clothes wasn't a thing anymore by the mid-90's, though.

Overalls are more of a 90's thing.

Almost nothing in music seemed truly 80's by 1995. No heavy synth, new wave, glam metal.

I think the people in that video can pass for 1993, but probably not before.

The internet started becoming a big deal in 1995. By 1999, a good amount of people were online.

Last edited by Jon8033; 03-06-2015 at 11:24 PM..
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Old 03-06-2015, 11:46 PM
 
Location: WAYNE MANOR
24 posts, read 65,239 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by valsteele View Post
People always act like the 80s is ancient and antiquated while the 90s is still fresh and relevant, and I used to feel that way myself.

But recently I've been looking at photos and videos from the 90s and listening to 90s music I grew up with and honestly most of the 90s was not that different from the 80s. 90s pop music was still full of gated drums and cheesiness, and there wasn't nearly as much rap on the charts as you'd think. Bryan Adams and Michael Bolton were still considered the bees knees from 1990 to 1994, that's how bad it was. Hell even Britney's debut album is much more similar to a Debbie Gibson album than to any recent pop album I've heard.

Even as late as 1997 you still had tons of people with thick rimmed glasses, mullets, overalls, and turtlenecks! The clothes people wore in the early and middle 90s are much more similar to 70s and 80s clothing than to clothing from after 2000. The TV was more similar too, sitcoms still dominated though when South Park came out I think things became a lot raunchier. The only reality shows from the 90s I can remember are Blind Date, COPS and The Real World.

Most people would probably peg this video around 1990, but it's actually from 1997.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A81IwlDeV6c

I think people think 1989 and before was pre-Internet times and 1990 to today is the "Internet era" (the Internet's actually existed since the 70s) and they're like day and night. But actually Internet use was surprisingly low even in 1999 - only about 35-40% of Americans were online then (and far lower than that for almost every other country in the world), and fewer than 10 percent in 1994. Hardly anyone was online in 1993 aside from gamers and academics. If you were lucky you might have had a college email address but that's about it. Most people in western countries didn't even own computers, only a large minority did. The world was still a much bigger place than today and information traveled a lot more slowly even though "globalization" was really starting to kick into gear then.


Cell phones were around throughout the 90s but there wasn't really a "cell phone culture" until the early 2000s. My parents didn't have cell phones until 2003. Most people didn't feel a need to have one because there was a payphone on every corner, the sound quality was inferior, and they were expensive compared to landlines. I do remember many people owned "beepers".

Digital cameras were apparently around but I don't remember them until the very late 90s and the quality was so terrible and the price so high that everyone still used film, even as late as the early 2000s. The only digital technology that pretty much everyone used was CD players.

Lastly, Clinton and Reagan are not nearly as different as people think. Reagan was a neocon, and Clinton was a very right-leaning neoliberal. The 90s was just as much a conservative capitalist money-loving decade as the 80s. Worldwide even more so than the 80s when you consider the 90s was the decade of the Washington consensus and austerity.
I definitely agree with you, some people make it seem like the 80's was vastly different to the 90's and it really wasn't. Now I was born in 1990 so obviously I don't have firsthand experience to how the 80's were really like but I know the difference wasn't huge.

Like you said the internet wasn't as dominant in the 90's as it is now, my family didn't even get the internet until 2002. It's like TV in the 40's, sure it existed back then but you can't really say it was a big part of the culture because the majority of people didn't own one. And the current textspeak cellphone obsessive youth culture didn't start until the mid 2000's.

People around here always treat the 90's as if it was the same as the 2000's and 2010's but it much different than those decades. The late 90's through early 2000's were similar I'll admit but definitely not the mid 2000's through now. The 90's were the last decade imo to have a "vintage" feel to it. Now movies from the 90's are starting to get those flicker specks older movies developed over time. Turner Classic Movies even recently started showing movies from the 90's. Things like grunge, Titanic, Jurassic Park, the Spice Girls, TRL era acts(Britney Spears, Backstreet Boys, Nsync, etc) Austin Powers, Beavis and Butt-Head, Clueless, the Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, and other 90's pop culture icons certainly don't feel like today's pop culture.
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Old 03-07-2015, 04:06 AM
 
Location: West Los Angeles
8,829 posts, read 8,959,075 times
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There was a huge difference between the two decades. In the middle of 1991, pop culture suddenly got sullen. Def Leppard and Whitesnake were replaced in popularity by Pearl Jam, Nirvana, and various other types of "complaint rock". There was no longer a Reagan/Bush legacy keeping us safe and promoting prosperity, but instead there was a new tone of pessimism because of deindustrialization of the U.S. (rust belt, etc.), as well as skyrocketing concerns over environmental damage. By 1994, the thing to do was wear a plaid shirt, ill-fitting pants, and hate everything.

It was a huge change.
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Old 03-07-2015, 01:06 PM
 
74 posts, read 61,705 times
Reputation: 131
I was born in 1995 and can say from what I remember and from research that the 90s sucked. The 80s was a fun and upbeat decade, the 90s was when all the fun ended.

If I had a time machine id love to be a teenager in the 80s. It felt like a decade that was 30 years ahead of it's time.
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Old 02-25-2018, 12:22 AM
Status: "Soon I'll hear old winter's song.." (set 13 days ago)
 
Location: Saint Paul, MN
5,391 posts, read 2,845,108 times
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I can't speak for the 80s, I wasn't born yet and my earliest memories are from maybe 1996 and for sure 1997, but looking back the early 2000s and late 90s are very similar and the 90s influences lingered on til about 2004-2005. I can imagine it was the same for the 80s and 90s. I wonder who we will look at the 2010s and 2000s in retrospect. Interesting to think. We still have lots of 2000s influences in 2018 but looking back at 2000 it feels like a very different society.
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Old 02-25-2018, 03:48 AM
 
1,323 posts, read 577,257 times
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There is a bar about 9 miles from me that is close to university of Arlington called "caves" when I enter I always feel nostalgic. if you had a time machine you could take a random 20 year old from a pearl-jam concert in 1992 bring them to the present and plop them into a group of 20 year old's today and they would not look out of place.

if you took a 20 year old from 1986 and dumped them in a group of 20 year olds in 1994 even they would stick out like a sore thumb. if you took a 20 year old from 1977 and dropped them of in 1983 they would stick out like a sore thumb. if you took a 20 year old from 1964 and dropped them off at woodstock (just 3 years later) they would stick out like a sore thumb.

This photo was not taken in the 90's
but you still see people that look like this and not just 40somthing people like me. and if you sent this couple back in time to 1991 or any year in between they would still blend in fashion has not changed very much in the last 20+ years it get's added to but not really changed.



I can go through old boxes and put on any of my clothes from the 90's and not look silly, but if I wore ANY of the stuff I had from the 80's I would get snickered at all day lol(well except for my concert shirts). but my old miami vice suits and cappericci pants would get me beat up lol.
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Old 03-02-2018, 06:02 PM
 
433 posts, read 269,746 times
Reputation: 351
I was born in 70, so probably a lot older than most of you here. I think the 0s were radically different from the 90s. Unfortunately what we see of the 80's today are short snippets that don't really cover all that was going on. But really I think we tend to think in terms of decades as that is how we name them, but really it is easier to group things into late 60's/early 70's, late 70's/early 80's, late 80's/early 90's.

The early 80's were still very much an analog world. Phones had cords, if you were lucky enough to have a TV in your room it was black and white. Computers were just coming out. But everyone thought they would take over the world. On the other hand, the future was still bright - technology was going to save everything, everything was going to be techno. But the real big thing was that the world itself was still very much segregated. You guys probably can't relate to the idea, but the cold war was still going on - nuclear war wasn't something you read about - you really thought it was going to happen one day. China was still this backwards closed off country, nothing was made there because nothing could be traded. Japan was where all the cheap stuff was made, and Toyotas and Hondas were still cheap small cars (but made well). There was still an East and West Germany. There was no such thing as "European" culture because there was no unified idea of Europe - half of it was still behind the curtain, and each country still retained it's own identity.

Then in the 90s the whole world changed. The joke was always that maps would come with markers so you could keep track of all the changes. The opening of markets - and how well certain countries did at adapting to technology manufacturing. The world became the electronic one we predicted, and you suddenly had this great big age gap between the older people and the young. for instance in 88 having a cell phone was for the rich. By 92 every dealer advertised you would get a cell phone with every new car purchase. And they were these hug things that came in a bag and had to be plugged in all the time. And an anti-technnology movement began. But we were flooded with new styles as worlds collided. Before the mid 90s no one knew what a Muslim was, and when you did meet them they were just like someone else who happened to wear something over their head. The religious was was between the Catholics and the Protestants. Suddenly instead of having to save up for years to travel cross country, you could do it for a weekend. Everyone was suddenly able to fly to Europe! And you started moving cross country and not just a state over.
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Old 03-02-2018, 06:13 PM
 
433 posts, read 269,746 times
Reputation: 351
Quote:
Originally Posted by cyphorx View Post
if you took a 20 year old from 1986 and dumped them in a group of 20 year olds in 1994 even they would stick out like a sore thumb.
They would probably stick out like a sore thumb anywhere. That was the idea back then - as bold and individual as you could be. The revolution was on! Not that anyone had any clue what the heck they were revolting against or why, but that was where the world was. Unlike the 90s when suddenly everyone was trying to get along in a changing world, the 80s had clearly defined borders.

But I think one thing you brought up - that is what maybe changed so much now that I think about it - what age was a kid and what was an adult. In the 80's, you graduated high school and you were an adult. Some people went on to college, some didn't. Getting married at 20 and having kids was not uncommon and certainly not unacceptable. I think the technological explosion that happened in the 90s (the first tech bubble) changed everything. suddenly everyone had to go to college to succeed. You were still a kid - and still related to the high school crowd - until you were at least old enough to drink, if not older. At the same time, I think kids, even in high school, became much more mature. not necessarily wiser, but they wern't so innocent of the ways of the world.

I notice, especially with my particular age group: The kids born before 70 simply valued the idea of hard work. They were part of, and bought into, the traditional business world. My particular age group (I'd say
born 69-72 or 73) were hopelessly lost - a bunch of substance addicts with no guidance. The group that came after, say 74 to the late 70s/early 80's saw themselves as the future and are a lot more independent minded and self resourceful.
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Old 03-03-2018, 12:11 PM
 
1,440 posts, read 845,481 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cloudship View Post
My particular age group (I'd say
born 69-72 or 73) were hopelessly lost -no guidance..
Cloud, good post.. Generation X definitely earned it's name. In defense of X tho, I blame (in large part), the Baby Boomer parents, teachers, cultural influences.

My perception, Boomers & aging hippies uniquely demonized patriotism, religion, had unprecedented divorce rates. It left the up & coming Xers with little cultural bedrock. So by the 9os a lot of those lost X kids were entering adulthood with cynical attitudes. I especially noticed in the late 90s, the obesity epidemic, folks covered head-to-toe in ink & piercings, shameless out of wedlock reproduction, ridicule of religion, Jerry Springer & Maury etc all over TV.
Now it's (tragically) normal & bequeathed to the future..
Take care.
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