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Old 01-02-2018, 04:23 AM
 
2,718 posts, read 1,875,418 times
Reputation: 5165

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Yes.

Laughter is a fear response. That is why when two guys are going nose to nose, one will submit by smiling. That is why people giggle when they are uncomfortable. That is why good humor touches a nerve. Or, as Homer Simpson would say, "its funny because its true."

Laughter comes from a place of discomfort.

You level may be lower than some. That is a matter of taste.
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Old 01-03-2018, 10:27 AM
 
Location: East Flatbush, Brooklyn
418 posts, read 84,652 times
Reputation: 769
The only "appeal" of offensive humor is that the antisocial morons who've felt "constrained" all their lives to not express hateful or offensive views in polite company have found an outlet through which they can finally have their beliefs validated. The "shows" that the offensive comics perform also give like minded people a "safe space."

Case in point: Andrew Dice Clay. Clay was literally performing a character that was based on racist goombahs. There were no "jokes" in his act, because the whole point of that act was to make fun of those Jersey Shore/Brooklyn types. But the goombahs felt so validated by the racist stuff his character was saying that they became his biggest fans. They thought, "Oh, wow, he's so funny for saying what we all think."

Same thing with all these other acts. When whats-his-face ranted that he'd kill his son if he found out he were gay, where was the "joke?" It's not a joke. It's a statement. But people liked the "joke" because it was validating what many of them were thinking and were too afraid to say in public. And they laughed out of "delight" that finally someone had the guts to validate their feelings, not because they thought the "joke" was funny.
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Old Today, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Canada
965 posts, read 566,974 times
Reputation: 2831
I suppose it all depends upon one's criteria of what they consider offensive. Personally, I prefer a comedian who can deliver a joke without using highly personal attacks on others. Yet in today's society, a comedian who bases jokes upon clean, non-personal attacks is becoming more difficult, and more rare. The more we accept disparaging remarks against others as okay, the more difficult it becomes to not be part of a society that constantly judges and belittles.

One thing I don't care for are comedians who use a constant barrage of heavy obscenities in their act, relying upon crude language to carry otherwise lame jokes. For these types of comics, I only see them as desperate, with no real ability to entertain an audience beyond "I used the F-word and the C-word 145 times, and it worked...they laughed". Entertainment? Not to me. That's a lazy person's way of trying to get a laugh, and all it does is make the entertainer look rather pathetic.

However, far worse are comedians who will attack anyone in order to get something to pass as a joke. Attacking moral character, mocking or attacking the disabled (even a certain "head of state" did this, and of course later denied ever doing so), attacking people affected by tragedy (justifying it with "oh what...too soon?")...on and on...to me is, at the very least, in extremely poor taste. And the more it is done, the more acceptable it becomes to society in general. Go onto any social media website and you will find a majority of people more than willing - even eager, lying in wait, so to speak - to attack and tear down someone else for holding an opinion that differs from their own, with some going so far as to wishing the other person would die. When did this become acceptable? When did it become the norm? I do believe that while comedians who attack others in the name of comedy may not have started the trend, it certainly does contribute to it. And it says a lot about how little we have truly progressed.
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Old Today, 05:46 PM
 
Location: East Flatbush, Brooklyn
418 posts, read 84,652 times
Reputation: 769
Quote:
Originally Posted by bassetluv View Post
When did this become acceptable? When did it become the norm? I do believe that while comedians who attack others in the name of comedy may not have started the trend, it certainly does contribute to it. And it says a lot about how little we have truly progressed.
I put the blame squarely on Howard Stern and Joan Rivers. They were the two biggest comedic celebrities who popularized this vicious, hate-filled mindset of "there's no such thing as being offensive." This mindset was created in the 1980s as a backlash to political correctness.
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