U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 08-19-2018, 03:17 AM
 
Location: Clovis Strong, NM
3,347 posts, read 4,494,674 times
Reputation: 1927

Advertisements

Where do creators of such imaginative worlds close to our reality get their inspiration from? Post nuclear war or outbreak movies, it's always a bleak landscape of destroyed cities and overall societal decay.

Since none of us haven't experienced anything like that on such a scale, are the portrayals represented in movies like "The Day After", or "The Stand" supposed to be a mix of ideas? Like pictures and experiences from real world events like the Black Death, the 1918 Influenza outbreak, and the aftermath of Hiroshima and Nagasaki magnified?

It's just something that's been biting at me for awhile.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-20-2018, 03:59 AM
 
Location: Texas Hill Country
8,777 posts, read 4,706,629 times
Reputation: 7643
Hard to say for after all, "She" https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0090009/?ref_=fn_al_tt_2 was probably more fun than anything "realistic".


It really isn't that hard to do when you think about it. Ever see the flick "The Dungeonmaster" https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0089060/?ref_=nv_sr_3 or "Warlords" https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0096419/?ref_=nv_sr_6 ? What do you need tor the post apocalyptic scene/theme in those flicks?


"Imagine a world where you only see 1/10th of the government you see now.".


That is what sci fi is, really, anyhow. It is asking the question "what if" and I guess in these cases, a lot of "what ifs".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-20-2018, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Clovis Strong, NM
3,347 posts, read 4,494,674 times
Reputation: 1927
So, in other words, most of the inspiration for these post apocalyptic lands comes from our own past? Seems reasonable.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-20-2018, 01:31 PM
 
58 posts, read 12,239 times
Reputation: 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by bentstrider View Post
Where do creators of such imaginative worlds close to our reality get their inspiration from? Post nuclear war or outbreak movies, it's always a bleak landscape of destroyed cities and overall societal decay.

Since none of us haven't experienced anything like that on such a scale, are the portrayals represented in movies like "The Day After", or "The Stand" supposed to be a mix of ideas? Like pictures and experiences from real world events like the Black Death, the 1918 Influenza outbreak, and the aftermath of Hiroshima and Nagasaki magnified?

It's just something that's been biting at me for awhile.
The effects of nuclear blasts are well understood because history has seen two of them used in combat and over two thousand test detonations, several hundred of those above ground. And basic physics can be used to calculate, say, a 500-kiloton ground burst at JKF or a 2-megaton airburst over southern Manhattan (to use examples from typical strategic nuclear targeting).

The outbreak apocalypse is a different story. There, physical decay comes indirectly from the neglect resulting from depopulation and/or social collapse. This involves more imagination, but there are numerous real-world examples of how unmaintained landscapes age. There are ghost towns and abandoned cities, the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, the abandoned portion of the Pennsylvania Turnpike (parts of the The Road were filmed there precisely for that reason), and the like. Of course, many outbreak stories (such as Stephen King's The Stand) take place in the time of and immediately after the outbreak, before any real decay has had a chance to occur, though often civil disorder results in some infrastructure damage.

The rest is filled in by the imagination of the author, guessing at what might happen and/or portraying things in a manner conducive to the story.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-23-2018, 04:54 PM
 
8,073 posts, read 8,366,833 times
Reputation: 9991
Well, Margaret Atwood has repeatedly said that everything in "The Handmaid's Tale" already exists.

Not post-apocalyptic, but certainly dystopian.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-28-2018, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Louisville KY
3,830 posts, read 3,467,890 times
Reputation: 2996
I think Mad Max stems from the gas crisis brought on by the oil embargo.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-01-2018, 03:27 PM
 
Location: The end of the world
270 posts, read 108,827 times
Reputation: 234
In my area we had a problem with gas when the hurricane hit. It was literally like the start of MadMax. Miles of people lined up at gas stations with police on patrol. So basically you combine the outcome of various events.

Take "Devil Man" and "Dangerous Jack".

In DM rock and roll was the rage during the 1960's

In DJ the world ended from

Heck even look at "future boy Conan"
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-01-2018, 11:06 PM
 
16,122 posts, read 17,024,005 times
Reputation: 22904
Quote:
Originally Posted by bentstrider View Post
Where do creators of such imaginative worlds close to our reality get their inspiration from? Post nuclear war or outbreak movies, it's always a bleak landscape of destroyed cities and overall societal decay.

Since none of us haven't experienced anything like that on such a scale, are the portrayals represented in movies like "The Day After", or "The Stand" supposed to be a mix of ideas? Like pictures and experiences from real world events like the Black Death, the 1918 Influenza outbreak, and the aftermath of Hiroshima and Nagasaki magnified?

It's just something that's been biting at me for awhile.

Well in a nuclear war you would have destruction from the bombs so it would be a immediate buildings exploding crap blown up damage factor

In a epidemic type of scenario you would have a longer time because weather and people would be what eventually damages the buildings. Onc3 a window is broken eventually weather, animals and people get in. Also the maintenance of the buildings wouldn’t be there so things would break down. Water would get in and damage things.
Look at the Russian nuclear reactor meltdown in Chernobyl. To me that’s what the world would eventually look like. Things would just slowly deteriorate
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top