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Old 08-08-2010, 02:56 PM
 
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I just learned that we have heard from some relatives of my Grandma's from Germany, who was researching his family tree. I am wanting to learn anything I can about Germany, not so much history, but what modern life is like there. Would love to hear from anyone, maybe some movies I could watch made in Germany,etc., really interested in what life is like there.
Thanks for any help!
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Old 08-08-2010, 09:36 PM
 
Location: Houston
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http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0301357/
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0130827/

I am not even trolling
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Old 08-09-2010, 04:19 AM
 
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What's Germany like? Well, a lot like the U.S., except:

- The trains run on time and connect with other modes of mass transit, making it very easy to get around in the whole country.
- You can drive VERY fast on their highways (The Autobahn)
- Germans have a whole different philosophy about driving; they know what their vehicle will do and they know what the other drivers will do out on the road. That makes them able to drive 120 mph+ more safely than we 'Mericans" ever could.
- They don't have the idiotic alcohol laws we have, so you'll find such things as liqueur-filled candies and ice cream.
- They tend to be more financially conservative than we U.S.-ers, which stifles entrepreneuership somewhat, but makes the financial services folks behave a little better
- Strong labor unions have protected worker's rights far better than this side of the Atlantic (or made Germany less competitive, depending on where you sit at the table...)
- Germans tend to respect the rights of the group instead of having the "It's all about me" mindset that we have too much of on this side of the Atlantic.
- Germans bring their well-behaved dogs into stores and restaurants where allowed. Their children don't run wild in restaurants, either.

There's a lot more, I'm sure. But I'll start with these.

Last edited by Crew Chief; 08-17-2010 at 11:49 AM..
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Old 08-09-2010, 05:13 AM
 
Location: Socal
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My experience is you can tell that a lot of Americans have some German roots. It's not crazy different like Crew Chief already said.

There are not many poor people (you hardly see homeless people and there are no dangerous areas), but not too many super rich people either. Everyone is closer to the median.

Different cities have a unique culture and/or image such as..

- the conservative, traditional Munich in Bavaria close to the Alps with Octoberfest
- the creativ hub Berlin - very multicultural and artsy
- the gay capital Cologne known for its Carneval
- Hamburg as the traditional modern port city

Check out some documentaries rather than movies.
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Old 08-09-2010, 07:57 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Munich View Post
There are not many poor people (you hardly see homeless people and there are no dangerous areas), but not too many super rich people either. Everyone is closer to the median.
Munich, my experience (at least when I lived in the Eifel area in the early '90s) was that most Germans did not flaunt their wealth like Americans and others do. Now, I realize that it's been awhile since I've lived there and perhaps a new generation of Germans have grown to enjoy display wealth.

Now, I certainly would never give up that American passport in my safe. And I truly love the way we U.S.-ers do some things. And, yes, there are "low socials" in Germany, too. But, traditionally, Germans, value leisure somewhat more than we do. Germany isn't a "24/7/365" mode yet. Stores close early on Saturday and few are open Sunday. I believe many of our social ills here in America are due, in part, to us working so long and enjoying life less.
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Old 08-09-2010, 10:14 AM
 
Location: God's Gift to Mankind for flying anything
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KsStorm View Post
I just learned that we have heard from some relatives of my Grandma's from Germany, who was researching his family tree. I am wanting to learn anything I can about Germany, not so much history, but what modern life is like there. Would love to hear from anyone, maybe some movies I could watch made in Germany,etc., really interested in what life is like there.
Thanks for any help!
<<<we have heard from some relatives of my Grandma's from Germany>>>
Have YOU spoken to them ?

Movies ... No ... Do American movies represent True American modern life ?

Is there any chance for you to visit those *long lost* relatives, some day ??
Nothing better than personal experience.
Anything else is hearsay, and *their* opinions ...

In a nutshell, modern European life is not much different than what you are accustomed to.
It is actually their *history* there that makes it so interesting.
European City Life ... seen that before almost anywhere.
European Country life ... affected by their history a lot !!!
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Old 08-09-2010, 09:33 PM
 
2,792 posts, read 3,654,996 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irman View Post
<<<we have heard from some relatives of my Grandma's from Germany>>>
Have YOU spoken to them ?

Movies ... No ... Do American movies represent True American modern life ?

Is there any chance for you to visit those *long lost* relatives, some day ??
Nothing better than personal experience.
Anything else is hearsay, and *their* opinions ...

In a nutshell, modern European life is not much different than what you are accustomed to.
It is actually their *history* there that makes it so interesting.
European City Life ... seen that before almost anywhere.
European Country life ... affected by their history a lot !!!
A cousin there found my dad & his brother while doing genealogy research, & we have just begun email correspondence. He is leaving for a vacation in Austria so will have to wait until he gets home to learn more about the family. Pretty exciting!

Thanks everyone for helping out! I mentioned movies because I am curious what the houses,buildings,countryside,etc looks like. Have been doing a lot of Googling ,will have to see if I can find any documentaries.
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Old 08-15-2010, 03:15 PM
 
634 posts, read 1,499,185 times
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Facts about Germany:
like in the US, we have different slangs. For me ( i live near Frankfurt) it is very difficult to UNDERSTAND the bavarian slang. The bavarian slang is very difficult to understand, even when you`re german. Bavaria is famous for the beer, of course, and the "Weisswurst", the Octoberfest in Munich. And Munich is the most expensivst city in germany ( rent, living costs...)

Frankfurt has the highest crime index in germany.

Germany has very good wine, too. Especially the wines made in the "Rheingau". Rheingau is a 30 minutes drive from Frankfurt.

Germans walk their dogs more often and longer than americans AND we don`t put them in a "Dog buggy??" Nobody!!! uses indoor pet restrooms, neighbours would call the police to pick the dogs up and protect.

You don`t tip that much in germany ( tip is included).

Germans aren`t late at appointments.
You are not allowed to use your cellphone while driving a car.

There`s nearly NO VALET parking in germany, you park your car by yourself. There are no desinfection towels for the supermarkt shopping carts ( seen in Miami) . There is nobody who packs your bags in a supermarket.

NOBODY pays 50 Bucks for parking in front of a restaurant ( seen on Ocean Drive, Miami).
Supermarks are closed at 10pm, latest.
No shops open on Sunday.

No brash? salespersons in shopping centers. You often need to call for them :-)

Only few places where you can get great american steaks.

NO STONE CRABS :-(

Prices: Mozzarella often less than 1 Dollar, Cigaretts 6,50 Dollar, average good wine per bottle 4 $, 1 Liter of unleaded gas: 1,40 € - dont convert, it will shock you!!!!!

You will never find cheescake or key lime pie in an italian restaurant menu :-)

You are not allowed to take your dog into a butchers shop or supermarket!

Health insurance is much cheaper in germany.

German cars are more cheap in america than in germany. Italian cars ( Ferrari, etc.) is more expensive in america.

melanie germany
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Old 08-16-2010, 08:33 PM
 
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melanie i sent you a message, but how how are german cars cheaper in america? in germany it cost a brand new C-class 34k E in the US its like 80k $, even though the avg German income is like 40k right?

but still most people in Miami that i know only make about 25-40k supporting families. one day my dream will be to own a german made car.
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Old 08-16-2010, 09:46 PM
 
Location: Blankity-blank!
11,449 posts, read 14,314,845 times
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Anyone who understands some German can see a little German TV on Youtube by searching for the following:
ARD - Germany
ZDF - Germany
For regional reports try:
HR3 - Germany (for Hessen)
BR3 - Germany (for Bavaria)
WDR - Germany (Nordrhein-Westphalen)
Weekly news magazine, Der Spiegel has an online version in English.
I lived in Germany for 18 years, almost 11 in Frankfurt. One of my jobs was as graphic designer for an ad agency (Lowe Group). Our main client was Opel. I worked at the agency when Opel introduced the Astra in 1992.
During all my years in Germany I never owned a car, the public transportation is excellent. Finding a parking space in Frankfurt can be an ordeal.
I liked that many auto manufacturers offered economical cars with small engines such as 1.2 liter. Cars this small not are available in the US, not enough interest.
Most of the cities are walkable so a car is not necessary.
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