U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Europe
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-07-2012, 11:13 PM
 
Location: Houston, Texas
1,178 posts, read 1,329,691 times
Reputation: 389

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by irman View Post
The *original* question was

is Mexican food popular in Europe?

So ... I think, it is getting more popular (I only lived there in the 80's and early 90's).(From some of the *on track* answers ...)Whether it is *truly* Mexican, is up for a long debate ...Not really part of the original question, or ?
True, but I don't think you can separate it. If restaurants in Europe only offer food stuffs that you'd find in Taco Bell, Chipotle or similar fast food areas, then they are offering a very limited view of a cuisine and it'll likely make Europeans believe that is all there is to their food as rebel seems to think.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-07-2012, 11:16 PM
 
567 posts, read 906,169 times
Reputation: 450
Quote:
Originally Posted by Canaan-84 View Post
True, but I don't think you can separate it. If restaurants in Europe only offer food stuffs that you'd find in Taco Bell, Chipotle or similar fast food areas, then they are offering a very limited view of a cuisine and it'll likely make Europeans believe that is all there to their food as rebel seems to think.
Fortunately, a fair number of Europeans have made their way to Mexico on holiday and have partaken of the local cuisine (local, that is, to the particular region they were holidaying in). I have yet to meet anyone over here who's been to Mexico and who thought the food sucked or was nothing special.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-07-2012, 11:50 PM
 
2,924 posts, read 2,351,921 times
Reputation: 618
Quote:
Originally Posted by Canaan-84 View Post
True, but I don't think you can separate it. If restaurants in Europe only offer food stuffs that you'd find in Taco Bell, Chipotle or similar fast food areas, then they are offering a very limited view of a cuisine and it'll likely make Europeans believe that is all there is to their food as rebel seems to think.
I wonder. Which one of you guys ever been to Europe?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-08-2012, 12:49 AM
 
567 posts, read 906,169 times
Reputation: 450
I live there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-08-2012, 04:35 AM
 
Location: on an island
13,382 posts, read 40,859,068 times
Reputation: 13244
Quote:
Originally Posted by Canaan-84 View Post
T Also, Tex-Mex is quite popular with white Americans not sure why you claim otherwise; people probably don't cook it at home, but they do go to the restaurants......True, but I don't think you can separate it. If restaurants in Europe only offer food stuffs that you'd find in Taco Bell, Chipotle or similar fast food areas, then they are offering a very limited view of a cuisine and it'll likely make Europeans believe that is all there is to their food as rebel seems to think.
Purely anecdotal, but I (and the rest of my extended family) cook it all the time, especially fish tacos. And when we do go out for Mexican food, we don't dine solely among white customers. Whether Tex-Mex or straight-up genuine Mexican cuisine, it appeals to a wide variety of palates.
I agree with Irman that what constitutes true Mexican is up for a long debate, and this topic has indeed been debated on City Data before.
Regardless of a dish's origin, to me, one of the most important aspects is the freshest and purest ingredients.
Speaking in those terms, I can't equate Chipotle with Taco Bell. But I would not presume to know what the French or other Europeans might think. Wasn't McDonald's embraced with open arms many years ago?

However, the Slow Food movement originated in Italy and is worldwide now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MetalLord View Post
Btw, much of European food is "peasant food." .
Exactly.
From minestrone to ratatouille to haggis to paella....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-08-2012, 08:03 AM
 
2,924 posts, read 2,351,921 times
Reputation: 618
Quote:
Originally Posted by MetalLord View Post
I live there.
Where?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-08-2012, 08:05 AM
 
2,924 posts, read 2,351,921 times
Reputation: 618
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueWillowPlate View Post
I can't equate Chipotle with Taco Bell.[/url] But I would not presume to know what the French or other Europeans might think. Wasn't McDonald's embraced with open arms many years ago?
Where in Europe? Ha ha ha ha ha ha
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-08-2012, 10:17 AM
 
9,969 posts, read 14,565,446 times
Reputation: 9193
Quote:
Originally Posted by MetalLord View Post
Btw, much of European food is "peasant food." New Yorkers will pay 20 bucks for a small plate of polenta and rave about it, but here in northern Italy it's basically analogous to grits and cornbread in Alabama. Not to mention tortillas! Starchy, carby grub that kept you going in the fields. You think every last European is some fancy pants gourmand and has been since the 1700s? Hardly. In fact, the vast, vast majority of Europeans are descended of peasants.

And what the hell do you call American BBQ? Smoked ribs? That came from slaves and poor whites in the South trying to make the most of tough cuts of meat. (Much of Roman cuisine stems from that exact same necessity, because the clergy got the best cuts of everything. Pizza was also poor man's food; a way to make use of scraps. Much of Italian food, north and south, was borne of poverty.) That ain't just peasant food, that's straight-up slave food.
Good post. And as someone who cooks often--and frequently cooks both Italian and Mexican food(and loves Italian and Mexican food)--I'll say that in general a lot of the classic Italian recipes are actually fairly easy to cook. You often have a very standard base of ingredients--garlic, olive oil, tomatoes, onions, parsley and other herbs--mixed in with pasta, polenta, or meat dishes. When I travelled around Rome and Southern Italy last year I was amazed at how delicious they could make a great meal from what was often a very simple recipe.

As well I find a lot of the heartier Central European cooking styles pretty simple and similar to each other(and I'm from a Polish family so I've eaten plenty of hunter's stew and pierogis in my life). Compartively a lot of Mexican "peasant" dishes actually have a huge list of hard to find ingredients including specific chiles rare outside of Mexico or different types of tropical fruits and vegetables, cactus leaves, and so on--and the more complicated moles and guisados(stews) of Mexico can take a day to prepare.

And the poster you're responding to, just seems to make it his mission to express his hatred of Mexican food across this board no matter how off topic it is. He basically spent several pages attempting to derail a thread comparing New York to Mexico City with his claims that "No one in America actually eats Mexican food."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-08-2012, 10:24 AM
 
Location: San Antonio Texas
11,435 posts, read 16,432,633 times
Reputation: 5224
Quote:
Originally Posted by mr bolo View Post
Mexican taquerias are very popular in the USA

do they have Taco Bell or any Taquerias in europe?
No, they don't have anything like Texmex or mexican food over there. When I was in Paris about ten years ago, I encountered a mexican ex-pat and asked him if there was anything decent there. He told me "no", but recommended "La Indiana"- a sit-down restaurant. It was really disappointing. Even margaritas don't taste the same. They use lemons (citron) instead of lime (citron vert).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-08-2012, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Native Floridian, USA
4,904 posts, read 6,098,836 times
Reputation: 6094
some of what rebel12 says, I have to agree with. I was visiting in Albuquerque within the last 5 years and was treated to what was called "authentic Mexican food". Our party sampled a variety of dishes. I can't remember the dishes themselves but I have to say, I was impressed personally.
Thats not to say the food was bad, I just never have been a big fan of, I guess, what is called Tex-Mex.

Now, I had a Hispanic gentleman doing some work for me and we would often go to a little trailer for soft taco's for lunch. That's all they made and I have to say, they were good. Soft corn taco's, the meat was simple(there was more exotic orderings) and they sprinkled some parsley on top. You could dish out chunks of cucumbers and onions, on ice, to accompany the tacos. There was red pepper sauce or green pepper sauce. Very good and 4 was my outside limit.....LOL.

I have been to other of these taco wagons and this one was THE best. Otherwise, I am not much interested in Mexican food.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Europe
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top