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Old 10-09-2012, 04:24 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Much of Poland was ruled by Prussia for quite awhile, over 100 years at least if I recall. How German was the area say prior to German Re-unification, and is there much Germany cultural legacy there? It seems most Poles throughout predominantly speak Polish, are there many old people who speak German. I find it interesting, it's kind of the crossroads of Germanic and Slavic Europe. The Poles vehemently resisted the Nazi's initial invasion, but of course they were easily crushed. It seems Poles are very distinct from the Germanic peoples.
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Old 10-09-2012, 11:20 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
It seems Poles are very distinct from the Germanic peoples.
Of course they are. They're Slavs. Like night and day with Germanic peoples, pretty much. And don't forget, part of Poland was handed over to Russia: Western Ukraine and western Belarus. You can't get more Slavic than that.

Poland absorbed southeastern Prussia, the original Baltic-speaking Prussia. Germany took the rest. Just saying.
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Old 10-09-2012, 11:36 PM
 
Location: the dairyland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Much of Poland was ruled by Prussia for quite awhile
Many parts of what is known today as Poland were not "ruled" by Prussia but instead were actually a part of Prussia, i.e. Germany. They were just like any other German area at the time. Further east there was a mix of German and Polish. After WW2 most Germans were expelled and now the areas don't resemble Germany a whole lot any more.
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Old 10-10-2012, 06:32 AM
 
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East Prussia was divided by Russia and Poland. The northern half, including Königsberg, went to Russia; the southern half to Poland. The Soviet Union annexed a big portion of eastern Poland to the Ukraine and compensated Poland by taking Silesia and Pomerania from Germany. What they called "East Germany" before reunification was more like central Germany. Germany lost all its lands in the east and Germans were expelled from those territories. Now, when you look at the map, you see that the German capital, Berlin, is just a short distance from the Polish border. East Prussia and the West Prussian provinces of Silesia and Pomerania were, for the most part, German for much longer than 100 years--more like 500 years. I would say that the older architecture in western Poland, in former German cities like Breslau and Danzig, remains very German. The Poles rebuilt the historic architecture in those cities as they did the center of Warsaw, which was historically Polish. The older people in former German territory are not any more likely to be German speaking than younger people because all the Germans were kicked out at the end of the war and the Polish inhabitants were themselves displaced from former Polish lands in the east. However, there's a lot of back and forth across the new border and younger Poles probably know a lot of German. Just my guess.
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Old 10-20-2012, 04:18 AM
 
Location: State Fire and Ice
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob702 View Post
Many parts of what is known today as Poland were not "ruled" by Prussia but instead were actually a part of Prussia, i.e. Germany. They were just like any other German area at the time. Further east there was a mix of German and Polish. After WW2 most Germans were expelled and now the areas don't resemble Germany a whole lot any more.
But if back in the distant history of , Poland is not Prussia ,this historical Slavic lands to the 9th century.where lived a glade
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Old 11-14-2012, 04:14 AM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
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"30 % der Deutschen stammen von Osteuropäern (20 % Slawen )"

It means that 30% of Germans origin from Eastern Europe (20% Slavic).

Source: Verbreitung der Deutschen in Europa und in der Welt

Does it really matter, Slavic or Germanic? Look at a German American, then at a Polish American, see any difference? I don't.
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Old 01-20-2013, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Macao
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emoeskaite View Post
"30 % der Deutschen stammen von Osteuropäern (20 % Slawen )"

It means that 30% of Germans origin from Eastern Europe (20% Slavic).

Source: Verbreitung der Deutschen in Europa und in der Welt

Does it really matter, Slavic or Germanic? Look at a German American, then at a Polish American, see any difference? I don't.
Polish-Americans are usually Catholic, and seemed to emigrate into cities - Detroit, Chicago, etc.

German-Americans were usually Protestant/Lutheran or who knows what...and seemed to go throughout the Midwest, predominately to be farmers. Some in the cities too, but more well-known for places like Cincinnati, Milwaukee, etc. I never think Germans and Chicago or Detroit, for example.

In short, I'm having a hard time thinking of the similarities between Polish-Americans and German-Americans.
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Old 01-20-2013, 09:41 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Polish-Americans are usually Catholic, and seemed to emigrate into cities - Detroit, Chicago, etc.

German-Americans were usually Protestant/Lutheran or who knows what...and seemed to go throughout the Midwest, predominately to be farmers. Some in the cities too, but more well-known for places like Cincinnati, Milwaukee, etc. I never think Germans and Chicago or Detroit, for example.

In short, I'm having a hard time thinking of the similarities between Polish-Americans and German-Americans.
There are a lot of German Catholics from Southern Germany too, in states like Wisconsin, Iowa.etc.
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Old 01-21-2013, 03:31 PM
 
Location: inside your head
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Much of Poland was ruled by Prussia for quite awhile, over 100 years at least if I recall. How German was the area say prior to German Re-unification, and is there much Germany cultural legacy there? It seems most Poles throughout predominantly speak Polish, are there many old people who speak German. I find it interesting, it's kind of the crossroads of Germanic and Slavic Europe. The Poles vehemently resisted the Nazi's initial invasion, but of course they were easily crushed. It seems Poles are very distinct from the Germanic peoples.
123 years, to be precise + some parts of modern Poland (i.e. Silesia, Pomerania, Mazury lakes and west Greater Poland) were German until 1945.

Polish-German relations are quite complex and hard to explain. First of all, there is only ~100,000 German minority members in Poland (though the number of people of German origin may be tenfold as high), concentrated mostly in Upper Silesia. Just to be precise, Upper Silesia is kinda interesting region because the population there is highly native, once being Polish and once German citizens, so being a German or a Pole is more a choice rather than a legacy (and, to complicate things more, 0.5m people there say they're neither Germans nor Poles, just plain Silesians, according to the latest census).

Poland itself is ridiculously split between the West, post-German areas where people like Germans much more, and East, "true" Poland areas where people have some anti-German sentiments. It's also a political split - people in the West support mostly Civic Platform (which quite similar to the Democrats in the US) while people in the East support heavily the Law and Justice party (which is like the Republicans when it comes to religion, society and stuff but very left-winged when it comes to the economy).
So, back to the point. People in the West like Germans more and they take care of post-German heritage (the magnificent city of Wrocław/Breslau would be the best example), even though most of them comes from the East (areas of prewar Poland that had been annexed by the USSR in 1945) and people in the East are more... suspicious about the Germans.
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Old 01-21-2013, 05:12 PM
 
Location: Chicagoland
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This is going back a bit, but the medieval and early modern Kingdom of Poland had a large and significant German population, concentrated in the cities, where they dominated the guilds and commercial life. As late as the 16th century, the main language heard in cities like Krakow and Poznan was German. This was due to a colonization policy followed by the Polish kings after the country had been devastated by the Mongols and needed to be rebuilt. This German population largely assimilated after a few generations, but left its traces in various ways (like the large number of German words, often quite modified, in Polish: e.g. burmistrz "mayor," from Buergermeister).

Probably the most famous Pole ever, Copernicus, was the son of a Polish father and a German mother, and grew up in Torun (Thorn), which means his native language was almost certainly German. In those pre-nationalistic days however, what mattered was that he was a loyal subject of the King of Poland.
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