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Old 01-07-2015, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jkmac View Post
The land around Vladivostok is called Outer Manchuria and it was a Tungusic Jurchen (later Manchu) city under heavy influence of Chinese culture. No one really cares about the damn cold northern Siberia land except Russian. To convert it into an Russian colony, they killed and expelled most of the native people during late 19th century. It's not rocket science and you can find loads of historical literature with a little dig.
What kind of nonsense is this? The area in general was inhabited by manchu villagers, but Vladivostok was never a Chinese/manchu whatever city. It was established from scratch in 1860 by the Russians, this is very well documented.
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Old 01-07-2015, 09:24 PM
 
15,031 posts, read 13,618,313 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
All of North America is a colony. The Slavic homeland is in Europe. Asia is a different continent. Russia colonized north Asia. There are plenty of books for you to read that explain this. Just because north Asia is contiguous to Russia doesn't mean colonialism didn't happen there.

Q. Was Russia at one time a colony of Mongolia? Or was it an integral part of Greater Mongolia?
No, Russia was a colony of Mongolia, not "integral part of Greater Mongolia."

"This time the invaders came to stay, and they built for themselves a capital, called Sarai, on the lower Volga. Here the commander of the Golden Horde, as the western section of the Mongol empire was called, fixed his golden headquarters and represented his sovereign the grand khan who lived with the Great Horde in the Orkhon Valley. Here they had their headquarters and held parts of Rus' in subjection for nearly three centuries. All of the Russian states, including Novgorod, Smolensk, Galich, and Pskov, submitted to the Mongol rule.[5]
The term by which this subjection is commonly designated, the Mongol or Tatar "yoke", suggests terrible oppression, but in reality these nomadic invaders from Mongolia were not such cruel, oppressive taskmasters.[6] In the first place, they never settled in the country, and they had little direct dealing with the inhabitants. In accordance with the admonitions of Genghis to his children and grandchildren, they retained their pastoral mode of life, so that the subject races, agriculturists, and dwellers in towns were not disturbed in their ordinary avocations. It was only in the 14th and 15th centuries, with the rise of the Tatar khanates, that slave raids on the Slavic population became significant, with the purpose of trading slaves with the Ottoman Empire. The raids were an important drain of the human and economic resources of both Muscovy and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, and they largely prevented the settlement of the "Wild Fields" – the steppe and forest-steppe land extending from about a hundred miles south of Moscow to the Black Sea – and they ultimately contributed to the development of the Cossacks."


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mongol_invasion_of_Rus%27
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Old 04-23-2015, 04:45 PM
 
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Vladivostok is a European city located in Asia. The population is predominantly Russian and Ukrainian, they speak Russian and the predominant religion is Eastern Orthodox Christianity, that makes it European regardless of it being in Asia. As previously stated, it is the legacy of colonialism. I'm Asian and never would I consider Vladivostok an "Asian" city other than by geography, nevertheless I think Vladivostok should be developed into an Asian economic hub and open-up to more Asian connectivity because it is literally the gateway to Europe for many Asians. It's less than a 2 hour flight from Tokyo, a major economic hub. The closest South-east Asian city is Manila which is a 5 hour flight. They had chartered flights (special plane routes) for the APEC 2012 Summit and I was honestly surprised to learn how close Vladivostok was to many Asian cities.

Most Asians are completely unaware of Vladivostok and just how close Russia really is for many Asian countries. They should start teaching more about Russia in Asian countries, especially Vladivostok. Asians often forget about Russia.

Last edited by Hakuin; 04-23-2015 at 04:58 PM..
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Old 04-23-2015, 05:03 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
78,546 posts, read 70,455,727 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gantz View Post
What kind of nonsense is this? The area in general was inhabited by manchu villagers, but Vladivostok was never a Chinese/manchu whatever city. It was established from scratch in 1860 by the Russians, this is very well documented.
It was a city already under the Mongols, in the late 13th/early 14th century, when it was called Yongmingcheng (City of Eternal Light). Prior to that, it was an important center of the Khitan Empire (Mongols, again). Later under the Manchus, Han Chinese were expelled.

Last edited by Ruth4Truth; 04-23-2015 at 05:22 PM..
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Old 04-23-2015, 06:00 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,983 posts, read 41,929,314 times
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The area is a white settler city, with most of the culture and population European but geographically not in Europe with some small degree of native influence. No one calls American or Australian cities European despite the population and cultural history being mostly European. Why should Vladivostok be any different?
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Old 04-23-2015, 06:02 PM
 
Location: London, UK
9,992 posts, read 9,948,054 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
The area is a white settler city, with most of the culture and population European but geographically not in Europe with some small degree of native influence. No one calls American or Australian cities European despite the population and cultural history being mostly European. Why should Vladivostok be any different?
Because its physically connected to Europe by land.
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Old 04-23-2015, 06:32 PM
 
Location: Macao
15,945 posts, read 36,144,182 times
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Culturally, VERY EUROPEAN....or, VERY RUSSIAN is a better way to say it.

I visited there from Korea, and you definitely know you aren't in Asia-Asia anymore.
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Old 04-23-2015, 08:37 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
78,546 posts, read 70,455,727 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Culturally, VERY EUROPEAN....or, VERY RUSSIAN is a better way to say it.

I visited there from Korea, and you definitely know you aren't in Asia-Asia anymore.
Except for the presence of all the local Asians. The Native peoples. Well, maybe not Vlad, but Khabarovsk has a lot of local Asians. "Very Russian" is a good way to describe the city, though.
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Old 04-23-2015, 08:53 PM
 
Location: Australia
247 posts, read 294,653 times
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Pretty much all regions of Siberia are Slavic majority, I think.
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Old 04-23-2015, 10:04 PM
 
120 posts, read 104,768 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
The area is a white settler city, with most of the culture and population European but geographically not in Europe with some small degree of native influence. No one calls American or Australian cities European despite the population and cultural history being mostly European. Why should Vladivostok be any different?
Vladivostok is a European style city in a European country (Russia)

America and Australia are not in Europe, they were colonized by Europeans like Latin America and Canada were too, that doesn't mean they are Europeans, Vladivostok feels Europe, while NYC or Sydney don't feel like you're in Europe.

Plus I don't know if I would call Australians or white Americans europeans, while an ethnic Russian slav IS European regardless of where they were born in Russia.
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