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Old 10-18-2012, 01:47 AM
 
634 posts, read 1,495,085 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Repubocrat View Post
Hey! Let the "smart" Americans do things their way, after all, they know better than the "dumb" Germans . As you know, we do everything better here in the USA, because we are #1 and our educational system is stellar!

Go ahead and home school your kids even if it is against German law, but who cares, Americans in Germany are above the law.

Go ahead and install an AC unit in your apartment, even if it violates the rules of your lease, but hey, who cares, as long as you can cool down your apartment, screw these stupid Germans

What chance does a child have (which is applying for a job) which mentiones on an inteview that it was home schooled? Which school level does the mother ( or father) need to home school? What if mom ( or dad) is not able to read or write or calculate? How can these parents homeschool their kids?
Sorry, i dont know anything about this "american thing".

A school teacher has lots of experience and studies at a university for many years. How can parents think that homeschooling makes more sense??? Are they more educated?

sorry, a little bit off topic maybe but i am a little curious about that....
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Old 10-18-2012, 08:33 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,494 posts, read 35,964,225 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MelanieGermany View Post
What chance does a child have (which is applying for a job) which mentiones on an inteview that it was home schooled? Which school level does the mother ( or father) need to home school? What if mom ( or dad) is not able to read or write or calculate? How can these parents homeschool their kids?
Sorry, i dont know anything about this "american thing".

A school teacher has lots of experience and studies at a university for many years. How can parents think that homeschooling makes more sense??? Are they more educated?

sorry, a little bit off topic maybe but i am a little curious about that....
It is offtopic, but let me give you an idea of how it works over here.

My daughter is homeschooling her four children. They are ages 10, 8, 6, and 4. The three older children are already able to speak and write in Latin as well as English. They will start on Spanish when they get a bit older. They are reading the classics and are above their grade level in both language arts and math. They are also taking piano lessons and are involved in a local theater group.

There is a large homeschooling support/social group in her town. They get together often and pool resources. For instance, if one parent is particularly adept at math concepts, they may lead a math class. If another is great in horticulture they may teach a class on gardening basics. That sort of thing. Lots of field trips are involved as well, which are great learning opportunities. For instance, my daughter takes her kids to just about every scientific exhibit at the local science center, and all other exhibits at local museums. They raise food in their garden and bake from scratch, and go on bike rides together every day.

My daughter has about two years of college, but no degree. However, the curriculum she is using is state accredited and certainly simple enough for any disciplined and intelligent parent or adult to organize and implement.

The kids have to be formally tested each year and the results sent in to some sort of state authority. So far they are doing VERY well.

As for entrance into college, or job applications, most homeschoolers are using a state accredited curriculum, so that's not a problem. In fact, many homeschoolers test far above average on placement exams for college. I have never heard of homeschooling being a disadvantage in getting a job. I myself have hired workers who were homeschooled and frankly saw no negative difference in the quality of their work, or their interactions with coworkers or customers.

My daughter lives on a military installation. Homeschooling is a very popular option among active duty military families and affiliated workers - both in the US and overseas. It is not illegal for US citizens attached to the US military (either active duty or as a worker) to homeschool their children in Germany as well as most other countries.

That's why I asked if the OP was affiliated with the US military in any capacity.
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Old 10-18-2012, 08:58 AM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
21,260 posts, read 19,248,961 times
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I assume on military bases homeschooling is allowed, Germany probably has little if any jurisdiction on them. But American civilians living among Germans may not homeschool their kids

There are American schools in some German cities.
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Old 10-18-2012, 09:19 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
I assume on military bases homeschooling is allowed, Germany probably has little if any jurisdiction on them. But American civilians living among Germans may not homeschool their kids

There are American schools in some German cities.
On or off military installations, if US citizens who are military or attached to the military community live in Germany, they may homeschool or send their kids to local American schools.

Also, if an American can prove to the local German school district that attending the local German school would be detrimental to the child they may have the option of homeschooling. Of course, these parameters would vary widely depending on each unique situation.
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Old 10-18-2012, 09:34 AM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
21,260 posts, read 19,248,961 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
On or off military installations, if US citizens who are military or attached to the military community live in Germany, they may homeschool or send their kids to local American schools.

Also, if an American can prove to the local German school district that attending the local German school would be detrimental to the child they may have the option of homeschooling. Of course, these parameters would vary widely depending on each unique situation.
Yes, because military families will leave again sooner or later. But it would be irresponsible to homeschool kids in Germany, knowing the family will stay there in the long run as the kid would not get a job without German certificates. In Germany having been homeschooled means pretty much the same as being uneducated.
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Old 10-18-2012, 09:40 AM
 
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In Germany having been homeschooled means pretty much the same as being uneducated.

You`re absolutely right. We do not have a "Bildungspflicht" in germany - we have a "Schulpflicht" but haven`t found a translation for the two words. Sorry.

Maybe Neuling can help..
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Old 10-18-2012, 09:53 AM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
21,260 posts, read 19,248,961 times
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Well, it simply means that attending school is mandatory (for at least 9 years I guess, not sure, though).
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Old 10-18-2012, 11:34 AM
 
Location: God's Gift to Mankind for flying anything
5,321 posts, read 11,014,636 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MelanieGermany View Post
In Germany having been homeschooled means pretty much the same as being uneducated.

You`re absolutely right. We do not have a "Bildungspflicht" in germany - we have a "Schulpflicht" but haven`t found a translation for the two words. Sorry.

Maybe Neuling can help..
The only term I can think of in *English* is *Compulsory Schooling*.
When a person is not being *schooled*, then he/she is truant, and according to local State laws,which can differ greatly from State to State, the punishment can be from light to severe.

I am not really familiar with what all is involved, but apparently, *Compulsory Schooling* may not mean being educated at a public or private school only ! In the State where I live, the compulsory schooling age is 6 - 18 ! A lot longer compared to Germany, if Neuling is correct !
That also means that kids, under 6, in the USA do not HAVE to go to Kindergarten !!!
The OP oldest one is 6, so ...

Home Schooling in the United States is not uncommon at all, and is often better in many cases, when the results are compared, as in "What does the *home schooled* person know, compared to *Professional schooled*".

Just because in some countries it is *illegal* to not sent your kids to a *public or private school*, does not necessarily mean that a home schooled person is less capable of achieving what is normally required from a High School graduate.
Often, *home schooled kids* in the USA, start attending High School at a public or private school after being schooled at home. I only know of three families in my neighbourhood who are still home schooled at the High school level, but their parents are high caliber educators ...
I happen to know them and those kids are dang smart, to say the least. When we lived in Switzerland our oldest daughter took correspondence course from a USA University, and nobody complained there. She ended up with a Masters degree in the USA, after she earned her Bachelors in Switzerland !

Sadly, I must also admit, that many public school systems in the USA are not turning out the best possible. What the reason for that is, is unknown to me.

When we lived in Germany, our kids ranging from 2 to 8 when we arrived, all school age kids went to the local school, and the younger ones went when it was time for them to go to school.
The interesting part was, that the headmaster of the school, told us that *if we wanted to take our kids out of school for a short time*, that was not in the vacation time period, we were free to do so, since we were *Americans*. We did that once, and had no problems. When we returned, they just went back to school, like nothing happened. Was, what he allowed legal, who knows and honestly, who cares ? I did not !!
But we lived there for over 8 years.

Back to the OP situation.

She and her family are planning to only stay for at least 9 months, and maybe up to 12 months. What could be checked is the length of duration of her visa, and what type of visa will she have ? IF, for instance her *visitors* visa allows her to stay, let's say 6 months, then she would NOT have a permanent visa and thus does NOT fall under the *Schulpflicht* law !!
We had an *Aufenhalts whatever* (akin to a USA Green Card), and thus were under German law. Had a valid work permit and paid German Taxes ! (Wife did NOT have a work permit !!!, but she worked for *me* at home)

What I am about to say may not be *kosher*, but she could just extend her visitors visa some way or another, and thus not fall under local German law as decided under a Permanent Residency Permit.

First, an American citizen can enter Germany *without* a visa* for a maximum of 90 days. SO get in and then after 90 days go across the border, and come back in for another 90 days, unless there is a limit to the amount of 90 day periods successively. Problem solved ...

Visitors visas in the USA are valid for 6 months (I think), and all you have to do, to get *back in*, is to go over the border, come back in and get a new one. We used to do that with my parents when they were still among the living. We had them for more than 6 months many times. They were here (in the USA) just to do nothing ... , using *my car* and *my plane* (Dad was a pilot). My *payment* to them for raising me all those years. We were listed as their *sponsors*.

So the OP should find out about this *angle*. After all, she does have a definite maximum stay of no more than 12 months or maybe even less. She is NOT looking at becoming a permanent resident !

For the OP to plan many visits to *all over the place in Europe* (probably the only time she may have), may not be a good idea, if her kids are in Local German Schools. Not all *officials* may act like the headmaster we dealt with in Bavaria.
As stated above, with the *Schulpflicht* laws in Europe, she may not be able to take her kids out of school, when they are not on vacation time ...

My apologies to alice007 for bringing up another possible *headache* ...

OP: Your hubby will have a Business Visa and a Work permit, but you may not need any visa, if you do it the *right* way ...

Note of caution. The 90 days limit starts when you enter the Schengen area, so you may have to get out of the Schengen area to get a new 90 day limit !
Visit the closet German Consulate, and find out.

After all, you are not trying to get in and take *advantage* of all the freebies other *Non-Germans* often take for granted when they get to Germany. You are only wanting to be with your husband on this extended work assignment and more or less *live* there as a *tourist* for more than 90 days !

LBNL, anybody remember the case of Uwe und Hannelore Romeike who in early 2000 received Asyl Status in the USA, for wanting to Home School their children ? I wonder if more Germans desire to Home school if it was legal ??

Last edited by irman; 10-18-2012 at 11:45 AM..
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Old 10-18-2012, 12:33 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
21,260 posts, read 19,248,961 times
Reputation: 8460
Homeschooling is actually allowed in many European countries, but still, hardly anyone does.
After all, most parents go to work, so there is nobody left to do the homeschooling.
And frankly, many parents are so stupid these days that in many cases I would not envy the child, to put it mildly.
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Old 10-18-2012, 12:51 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,494 posts, read 35,964,225 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
Yes, because military families will leave again sooner or later. But it would be irresponsible to homeschool kids in Germany, knowing the family will stay there in the long run as the kid would not get a job without German certificates. In Germany having been homeschooled means pretty much the same as being uneducated.
I'm not debating the pros and cons of various school options - only whether or not those options are available for the OP.

I am not talking about allowing German kids to be homeschooled -That's up to German citizens to decide for German citizens.
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