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Old 10-21-2012, 08:40 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,494 posts, read 35,950,842 times
Reputation: 62903

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kevxu View Post
Americans yap, yap, yap, yap, yap constantly about race/color/ethnicity. Scan the various CD forums, it comes up everywhere Americans are simply obsessed with the topic. And for me it has ruined the pleasure of reading forums that should in fact have nothing to do with race.

I am an American who has lived in Europe a little over a decade, and I hear nothing like it in Euope. Yes, people have their likes, dislikes and stereotypes, but in my experience they do not talk, endlessly, obsessively about them. Race, etc. is very rarely a conversation topic among the Europeans I know.

Perhaps I am just lucky, but it is a world of difference. And it is refreshing.
Most European countries do not have the same ratio as much of the US has when it comes to minorities. It does make a difference.

For instance, my biracial daughter and her Puerto Rican husband just moved to Harrogate, England. She is absolutely SHOCKED at the low number of "minorities" there and feels quite conspicuous. Though no one has been rude to either of them, they are stared at quite a bit, and she has only seen one or two people of African descent there so far, and no Hispanics yet that she's aware of. So between their racial backgrounds and their American ethnicity, they are defintely "birds of a different feather."

They might get the same curious looks in Iowa or Minnesota, but they wouldn't raise an eyebrow anywhere along the East Coast, the West Coast, or the Gulf Coast states in the US.
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Old 10-21-2012, 08:44 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,494 posts, read 35,950,842 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
But but...Obama. But, he's black! Surely that's good enough reason to love us again? After all look how the people fell on their faces worshipping him when he toured Germany
Actually, just for the sake of accuracy, Obama is only half black. He is also half white.
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Old 10-21-2012, 09:19 AM
 
Location: Gorgeous Scotland
4,123 posts, read 4,738,406 times
Reputation: 3272
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Most European countries do not have the same ratio as much of the US has when it comes to minorities. It does make a difference.

For instance, my biracial daughter and her Puerto Rican husband just moved to Harrogate, England. She is absolutely SHOCKED at the low number of "minorities" there and feels quite conspicuous. Though no one has been rude to either of them, they are stared at quite a bit, and she has only seen one or two people of African descent there so far, and no Hispanics yet that she's aware of. So between their racial backgrounds and their American ethnicity, they are defintely "birds of a different feather."

They might get the same curious looks in Iowa or Minnesota, but they wouldn't raise an eyebrow anywhere along the East Coast, the West Coast, or the Gulf Coast states in the US.
In the small town near where I live there was a US navy base until 1991. There are some mixed race people here who had American sailors for fathers. Otherwise the area is very white. There's never any negative reactions. Occasionally we get some visitors from Africa who are quite dark-skinned, and they are looked at curiously but not negatively.

I've been a minority before - Uganda - and was stared at a LOT. But I became less and less uncomfortable the longer I was there. We brought our Ugandan 'daughter' to Scotland to visit and she got a lot of attention, but it was more like she was a celebrity.
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Old 10-21-2012, 09:23 AM
 
Location: Gorgeous Scotland
4,123 posts, read 4,738,406 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
No. I do not believe that Europeans in general are more tolerant. My gosh, look at the brouhaha over Muslim attire in France and minarets in Switzerland. Banning Muslim attire in a US public school, or banning the building of a minaret would not be mainstream in the US at all. Not to say it wouldn't happen, but it would be an exception rather than the rule.

I'm not arguing whether it's right or wrong, just stating a difference.
It wasn't all muslim attire that was banned in France, it was the head covering which only showed the eyes.
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Old 10-21-2012, 10:09 AM
 
320 posts, read 671,969 times
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After having lived in Europe (Belgium) and now in America, I can say yes Europeans are way less PC !
For instance, if you are a black and if they don't like black people, they will tell you "I don't like blacks people but I like you".
Those thinks won't happen in the US, if they don't like you, they will tell behind your back.
The positive side of European are more spontaneous and you can have endless debates of sensitive topics and still be friend.
In the US, you still have to take care of not saying something that could offend the people you're talking too (and if you do they won't tell you ...) and it's hard to do when you have a drink .
And I don't think Europeans are more tolerant.
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Old 10-21-2012, 10:52 AM
 
14,752 posts, read 28,546,220 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djmanu View Post
After having lived in Europe (Belgium) and now in America, I can say yes Europeans are way less PC !

The positive side of European are more spontaneous and you can have endless debates of sensitive topics and still be friend.
Exactly what I've experienced. Disagreeing with someone doesn't end the friendship. This is awesome.

You wouldn't believe what ended a friendship for me in the Seattle area. Without telling one of my favorite stories in full, I essentially told off a woman in line at the post office for California bashing, and I was in line ahead of her. I am native to California. I then told a friend, since the story was humorous, and this guy, a PC local of Scandinavian heritage who went to Stanford (in California!) proceeded to tell me that I was wrong, was really upset by this, and basically disappeared.
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Old 10-21-2012, 11:18 AM
 
Location: 59N
5,198 posts, read 5,848,400 times
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Scandinavia (Sweden, Denmark and Norway): Sweden is definitely the most politically correct country. There is actually quite a diffrence between Sweden and Norway:

Swedes are more obedient and rule-abiding, sometimes to a ridiculous degree
The Swedish culture is very collectivistic. The Norwegian one is more individualistic.
Swedes like order and system, not unlike the Germans.
Sweden is even more bureaucratic
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Old 10-21-2012, 11:40 AM
 
14,752 posts, read 28,546,220 times
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Great story: I was in Italy, and I have a cousin who was in his early 20s or so at the time. His musical taste in the 90s was more alternative rock. He went on to moan and moan about how Kurt Cobain had died. I had lived in Seattle. I told him I didn't give a rat's ass that Kurt Cobain had died. A few days later, he said to me with a sense of urgency "I told a friend of mine what you said about Kurt Cobain, and he wants to talk to you!" I told him I didn't need to talk to some twirp I didn't know. Spontaneous and overly-emotional? Yes.
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Old 10-21-2012, 11:55 AM
 
14,996 posts, read 13,572,953 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robertpolyglot View Post
Exactly what I've experienced. Disagreeing with someone doesn't end the friendship. This is awesome.

You wouldn't believe what ended a friendship for me in the Seattle area. Without telling one of my favorite stories in full, I essentially told off a woman in line at the post office for California bashing, and I was in line ahead of her. I am native to California. I then told a friend, since the story was humorous, and this guy, a PC local of Scandinavian heritage who went to Stanford (in California!) proceeded to tell me that I was wrong, was really upset by this, and basically disappeared.
Ha-ha, I bet it happened back in the 90ies and I don't see anything PC in this story; you've striked the nerve in Seattle's native, apparently. It was the time when the mass exodus of Californians to Washington forever changed the state and lavish, but low-key style of life of its residents...
Your friend might have been forced to sell his property to one of new-comers from California; it might have been very personal for him, and you think it was all about the PC)))
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Old 10-21-2012, 12:09 PM
 
14,752 posts, read 28,546,220 times
Reputation: 8779
Quote:
Originally Posted by erasure View Post
Ha-ha, I bet it happened back in the 90ies and I don't see anything PC in this story; you've striked the nerve in Seattle's native, apparently.
Somewhere between 97 and 99. Half of the East Side was ALREADY from California. Most Californians feel more comfortable living there, since it looks more like home. Center dividers on roads, complete with landscaping.
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