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View Poll Results: Sweden is more like
Finland 13 12.87%
Norway 88 87.13%
Voters: 101. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 10-28-2012, 06:04 PM
 
2,096 posts, read 3,847,635 times
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Which country does Sweden share more in common with in your opinion? The Swedish language of course is many times closer to Norwegian, but many Finns can speak Swedish including a significant minority as their first language, some Swedes in the North can speak Finnish and Finland was a part of Sweden for centuries.

Overall Sweden seems somewhere in between Norway and Finland culturally - which would you consider it more like?
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Old 10-28-2012, 06:15 PM
 
Location: New York metropolitan area
1,317 posts, read 1,283,022 times
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Sweden has much more in common in terms of everything with Norway, and even Denmark, than by Finland.
Even though Swedish is a minority official language, it's still very different culturally and almost everything else. However, this does not mean Sweden and Finland have nothing in common. But, Finland have more in common with Russia and northeastern Europe than with rest of Scandinavia.

Swedish and Norwegian are very similar languages, both countries share many TV shows together, etc.

The relationship between Norway & Sweden remind me of those in Canada & USA.
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Old 10-28-2012, 07:58 PM
 
15,029 posts, read 13,614,987 times
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[quote=Nunnor;26706978]Sweden has much more in common in terms of everything with Norway, and even Denmark, than by Finland.
Even though Swedish is a minority official language, it's still very different culturally and almost everything else. However, this does not mean Sweden and Finland have nothing in common. But, Finland have more in common with Russia and northeastern Europe than with rest of Scandinavia.[/quote]

Yeah, right.
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Old 10-29-2012, 01:56 AM
 
Location: Hong Kong / Vienna
4,557 posts, read 5,118,811 times
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As far as the similarities and differences between Finland and Sweden are concerned, it actually depends on the region you are comparing.
I'm studying as an exchange student in Turku, Finland at the moment. The city has the only university that's completely Swedish speaking, Åbo Akademi, which has 8000 students. When you are walking on the streets near its campus, you will hear plenty of Swedish and the cafeterias of the university serve Swedish food (which isn't too different from Finnish food). The Swedish-speaking population also carries typically Swedish names.
Other than that the size of the minority in the city is at about 5%. But there are towns in southwestern Finland, which have a considerably higher number of Finland-Swedes (Pargas 57,6%, Vaasa 25%, Kristinestad 57% and other smaller towns in the archipelago of Turku), there are even towns were only Swedish is spoken.
The island between Finland and Sweden, Åland, is a case on its own. It's autonomous, de-militarized and monolingual. Signs are in Swedish, as is everything else. When I went there two months ago it pretty much felt like Sweden.

So, i guess southwestern/western Finland and Åland have more in common with Sweden than the other regions, but are still unique.

I can't really compare Sweden and Norway, because I never went to Norway.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nunnor View Post
But, Finland have more in common with Russia and northeastern Europe than with rest of Scandinavia.
That's a misconception.
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Old 10-29-2012, 03:34 AM
 
Location: Sweden
23,747 posts, read 65,851,373 times
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Northern Sweden has more in common with Finland.
Southern Sweden has more in common with Denmark.
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Old 10-29-2012, 05:17 AM
 
Location: Finland
1,149 posts, read 906,466 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nunnor View Post
Sweden has much more in common in terms of everything with Norway, and even Denmark, than by Finland.
Even though Swedish is a minority official language, it's still very different culturally and almost everything else. However, this does not mean Sweden and Finland have nothing in common. But, Finland have more in common with Russia and northeastern Europe than with rest of Scandinavia.

Swedish and Norwegian are very similar languages, both countries share many TV shows together, etc.

The relationship between Norway & Sweden remind me of those in Canada & USA.
Sorry but it seems that you dont know what you are writing about...
I have visit in both, Canada and US, and I see there more difference than between Sweden and Finland.
Even borders have massive differences and as Bigswede wrote, northern Sweden and Finland are quite similar and even peoples daily life are mixed over the border (To both directions).

When speaking about culturally differences between Sweden/Finland/Russia, this is how it goes:
-When swedish comes to Finland, he or she dont need to ask anything about how to act or what to eat or even how to drive car on traffic...Because every where peoples are acting same way as in sweden and have same "Rules".
Same thing when with finns when he or she goes to Sweden.
- When russians comes to Finland, first they have problems with traffic rules, then they have problems with eating, then how to act on "Face to face" life and so on...And same with finns when going to Russia, also person from Sweden will have these same difficulties when going to Russia.

Note that these both exsamples are based to persons who visit first time in Finland/Sweden/Russia.

Also "Grey areas"(Culturally mixed daily life) between two country tells a lot and how they are culturally same:
Norway and Sweden have it, Sweden and Denmark have it,Finland and Sweden have it, Finland and Norway have it(On north) but....Finland and Russia dont have any grey area on culturally and specially on daily life.
I can put it also this way from my point of view:
-Traveling to Sweden, not big deal and like traveling in Finland.
-Traveling to Russia, going to abroad!
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Old 10-29-2012, 01:21 PM
 
Location: SWE
887 posts, read 1,376,127 times
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Finland is bilingual mostly on paper anymore, probably about 99% of finlandsvensk are fluent in finnish, save for a few uneducated ones who never left their small circles. Can't really say that too many finns are fluent in swedish. The % of finlandsvensk have been slowly but steadily declining, and other linguistical minorities (those who speak russian as their first language) are catching up. The finlandsvensk will eventually end up having to settle for the same influence and political privileges (or lack there of) as other linguistical minorities.

Åland is a far away, mostly forgotten hodgepodge of islands in the middle of nowhere, and would become one big ghost town after ghost town overnight if it wasn't for subsidies and favorable tax treatment on account from mainlanders.

Last edited by Vic_Vega; 10-29-2012 at 01:34 PM..
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Old 10-29-2012, 03:53 PM
 
Location: Finland
24,268 posts, read 18,765,643 times
Reputation: 11103
Almost as false as "Finland is closer to Russia than Sweden". I suggest you leave your small circles. Leave your puukko at home.

Vieraiden kielten osaaminen vuosina 1995, 2000 ja 2006 (18–64-vuotias väestö)

Percentage of Finns speaking foreign languages. Four levels, from basic to excellent knowledge in 2006.
English 82%, Swedish 65%, German 33%, French 11%, Russian 6%, Spanish 6%.

There aren't any signs that Fenno-Swedes are disappearing from Finland. About Åland, I don't even want to say anything. Your ignorance is shocking.
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Old 10-30-2012, 03:11 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,344,192 times
Reputation: 11862
Most of Sweden is more like Norway. Scandinavia could well have become a country.
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Old 10-30-2012, 04:48 AM
 
Location: 59°N
5,211 posts, read 5,864,460 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Scandinavia could well have become a country.
Not really. 15 years ago the two largest telecom companies in Sweden and Norway tried to merge. It ended in disaster. Norway is not willing to be Sweden's obedient little brother anymore.
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